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  1. schoondoggy

    schoondoggy

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    SpivR

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  3. Al_Borges

    Al_Borges

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  4. netware5

    netware5

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Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation since 11/11/2019 in all areas

  1. 2 points
    For the last 10 years or so, Ive been using Onenote to help manage these things. Ill download the manual, info etc. Scan receipts into the folder I have a separate page for each appliance Since its on onedrive, its available where ever i go With regards to extended warranties, i think of them as very limited insurance policies against the loss of the object. In the great majority of cases, its not a good deal. They offer it to you to make money Beware of confirmation bias. The handful of times it comes in handy are far more memorable than the majority of times it was a waste of money
  2. 2 points
    Hey Dave, A few things that might help and others: Haven't used the UDM yet (I'm waiting for the UDM Pro which is still in final beta), but... My understanding is that you can restore a CloudKey controller backup to the UDM built-in CloudKey. Personally, in your configuration, I wouldn't physically reconfigure and move coax feeds and equipment. I would install the UDM in the basement replacing existing gear with just a simple cable swap. Sure, you're wasting the built-in AP, but everything else is much more straightforward. Theoretically, you should be able to restore your cloudkey backup, and have almost the same network up and running in just a few minutes. Then you can start deconstructing or reconfiguring more at your leisure rather than necessity of getting the network up and running for the entire household with no downtime 🙂 In your review of your existing setup, IMHO, the primary benefit of Unifi, even more than the wide choice of physical AP units and mounting options, is the extensive configurability and monitoring/status options. You kinda touched at this towards the end of the podcast, but the ability to limit the radio power, turn off the auto settings, and assign the Wi-Fi channels (especially the crowded 2.4 GHz frequency) to non-overlapped channel numbers is a big win for anyone trying to fix dead spots or avoid buying extra AP's as a "brute force" solution to solving coverage. (Not that there is anything wrong with that; sometimes spending $100 on an extra AP instead of spending hundreds of dollars of time and effort to tweak, is the right choice.) It wasn't clear that you are full exploiting the Unifi flexibility to fix your Ring camera/doorbell problems. First thing I usually do with a Unifi setup is to create a 2.4 GHz only SSID and enable it only on the AP radio that is physically the right unit for the Doorbells (or any IoT device that only supports 2.4GHz) to connect. Overriding the autoconnect/automatic behavior in Ring and other devices and forcing the connection to a specific AP solves almost all the Wi-Fi problems with these and similar devices that have somewhat dumb Wi-Fi firmware or less than ideal reliability. It's worth the trouble to re-program the SSID inside the Ring or other device and the results are much better than just having multiple AP's hoping they are in range. I'm really curious whether the UDM will be successful in bringing Unifi to the general consumer market, but I'm skeptical it will really be able to displace Eero, Google, Orbi, and other true consumer gear. One irony is that right now the early adopters of the UDM are all sophisticated Unifi users and that thing doesn't fit and looks awful in their otherwise beautiful rack porn photos they have been posting 🙂 Granted the UDM is a lot cheaper than buying the equivalent individual parts, but there are advantages to being modular too. Easier service, not losing everything if a non-critical module goes down, etc. There will always be a lively discussion between modular or integrated that goes all the way back to mainframes with terminals versus minicomputers and later PC's, so not trying to re-ignite that long standing debate, but merely point out that saving money isn't always the most significant reason to choose one over another. In the case of Unifi, both fans and users are primarily looking for new functionality. Personally, I would prefer to see some new capabilities made available, regardless of whether it is all-in-one or requires a new box. I can work around price and modularity issues, but I can't work around the lack of a critical feature. So, to bring this home, the only feature that UDM provides that doesn't exist in the current gear is the new USG router/firewall. Specifically, the UDM is rated to handle 1 Gbps speeds with full hardware speed packet analysis and intrusion processing. The current USG is only able to handles 100mbps and is severely taxed in performance at that speed. This is significant because consumer fiber and high speed home Internet connections have zoomed from 3 mbps to over 1 Gbps in many urban and metropolitan areas. Since you mentioned you don't have a USG in your current setup, I think you aren't in a good position to really understand the difference provided by the UDM versus the existing Unifi gear. I know some Unifi users prefer to use a separate router or the Ubiquiti EdgeRouter products because of these limitations and thus don't have the integrated management provided by using the USG. On a positive note, the UDM finally removes the insecure PPTP VPN protocol, but has not yet added support for OpenVPN for incoming VPN (to connect back to your home when you are away, or to use your home network as your own private VPN Internet gateway instead of a paid service), and that is a bit disappointing.
  3. 1 point
    You would need a LP bracket to mount it. You should confirm that it is a LP card, height of PCB. Bottom of the page shows the card is 65mm tall. That should be fine. If the holes are placed like other RAID/storage cards a standard LP bracket should work: https://www.ebay.com/itm/Low-Profile-Bracket-for-LSI-MegaRAID-SAS-Raid-9260-4i-9260-8i-9240-4i-9240-8i/263570695781?hash=item3d5e09a665:g:RSsAAOSwhQhY7ijN
  4. 1 point
    It should as it is SATA and not NVMe. OS support will be dependent on what SATA controller is used on the board.
  5. 1 point
    Use a VPN if possible, there are quite a few vulnerabilities in the RDP stack so we have closed it for clients unless they specifically sign a waiver
  6. 1 point
    The cable from the front drive bays needs to be connected to the P410.
  7. 1 point
    There is a molex power union located between the ODD bay and the front drive bays. That is where most people add a Y connector and branch off SATA power. You could use the FDD power connector in the ODD bay for power as well. Moving the SAS cable from the system board to the LSI will not affect the power. I am out of SDM brackets, but if you look at some of those post you will get cabling ideas.
  8. 1 point
    FreeNAS seems to like LSI HBA running IT mode firmware. I like the SAS9207-4i4E as it gives you a connection for four internal and four external drives. You could run the four drives in the front bays from the LSI. Buy a break out cable and run your SSDs from the internal SATA controller. Keep in mind the first two SATA ports on the motherboard are SATA 6Gb/s the other two and the ODD SATA port are SATA 3Gb/s.
  9. 1 point
    Working backwards somewhat to connect from outside: 1. The W10 desktop must be set to 'allow Remote Access' … and to a specific user account. 2. Your router's firewall will block unsolicited incoming traffic, so add a new 'port forwarding' rule to send traffic for port 3389 (the Windows convention is port 3389 = remote desktop) to the W10 desktop's LAN IP address. 3. Install the Remote Desktop app on your phone. 4. Fire up the app and connect to the allocated W10 user account - you'll be asked for the password. Expanded description at, for instance, https://lifehacker.com/use-your-computer-from-anywhere-a-guide-to-remote-cont-5902654 Not sure how Synology handles this … rtfm 😉 For bonus points you might need to use a dynamic DNS service (I use NoIP) and it would be more secure to find out how you can make Windows use a port other than 3389 for remote traffic. It would also be good policy if the account nominated or remote access had only user privileges and not administrator rights!
  10. 1 point
  11. 1 point
    Hi Guys Thank you for your help and patience, I managed to update through iLo, didnt do anything different, it just worked. so Ilo and bios firmware both 2019, do I need anything else updated? service pack?? thanks again K
  12. 1 point
    He is getting an error when trying to update the BIOS through iLo. I am just trying to give him and alternative path to getting it installed.
  13. 1 point
    I still cannot understand why you try to use bootable USB to update BIOS. It is so simple to update BIOS using iLO .... And yes, the right file to upload by iLO is CPQJ0613.684
  14. 1 point
    This one: https://support.hpe.com/hpsc/swd/public/detail?swItemId=MTX_e9bfdf20809a426cb16ef9cd81#tab2 What file have you been trying to install from iLo?
  15. 1 point
    Probably wasn't designed with the right power supply and cooling. Might also affect noise and EMI emissions. Otherwise, really stupid they didn't provide the sheet metal and power connection to support another drive, but the focus on the UDM Pro is rack mount form factor, not being a total all-in-one solution as they didn't include any PoE ports which is also stupid unless again power supply and cooling would push the cost higher and complicate the design from what they have.
  16. 1 point
    The OS booting and BIOS update are unrelated things. Just flash the latest BIOS using iLO and then start to think about OS boot.
  17. 1 point
    Have you tried to update the BIOS with a bootable USB and not use iLo?
  18. 1 point
    It seems to be going fine, no issues. VPN works as expected. The VAR that installed it takes care of the technical aspects. The customer complains about the support cost, but thy do not have their own IT, so they need the help. Fortinet does very well with SMB and education. I am not sure how cost effective their WAP's are, but they seem to be a nice end to end solution.
  19. 1 point
    This is a common problem - not just with OTA - even cable companies like Comcast and direct TV are broadcasting local channels in 720p in my area only 1 channel out of the 4 major networks broadcasts in 1080 - the rest are in 720 The sub channels are a "vast wasteland" of mostly junk programming. They are basically infomercial stations that costs almost nothing to carry by the host station. even if your particular cable vendor broadcasts in 1080 - the feed from the local station may be in 720 and just upconverted. still, my monthly expenses dropped by $60 a month by ditching cable
  20. 1 point
    I recently re-scanned my one tv that is hooked up OTA. Looks like my new roof has cut into reception from the attic. In any case I have two antennas, one of which is specifically for VHF-Hi. I spent a few minutes looking at the results. What I found soured me a bit to the thought that 'OTA TV is the best deal around.' Most of my locals have split their signal into 4 or 5 sub-channels (5.1, 5.2 5.3, 5.4, 5.5) leaving very little bandwidth for the main XX .1 and making the other 4 no better than the old pre-HD analog signals. Yuk! so as they say Your Mileage May Vary!
  21. 1 point
    Mikrotik RouterOS vulnerabilities were flagged by Tennable research and other security groups in mid 2018. They have been releasing patches in the second half of 2018 and the most of 2019 to resolve. These were vulnerabilities, not malicous actions, but you enjoy your your trip to 'whataboutism'. I dont know, I currenlty do not own any Cisco gear, so I dont track it. You could do some research and quantify the number for yourself. Perhaps you and Jacko could entertain each other bouncing 'what abouts' off each other.
  22. 1 point
    The minimum order for my sheet metal manufacturer is 100 units. I do not think there is enough demand for making another 100 units. If you are interested, I do have one Rev3 bracket left. The Rev3 mounts drives the same as the Rev4 it just has different mounts for fans. PM me through this site if you want it.
  23. 1 point
    Just in case anyone has this problem, the solution was to install the latest Broadcom drivers - I used this https://www.dell.com/support/home/us/en/19/drivers/driversdetails?driverid=cn7mv&oscode=ws19l&productcode=poweredge-r430 and I am now down to around 2-3% cpu at idle. No idea why the Broadcom NX1 driver (cp031155) from the hpe site had such high cpu. -Jim
  24. 1 point
    I have an X3421 Gen10 Microserver w/ stock 8GB RAM running Windows Server 2019 Eval. I did the standard install, then added HyperV and container support. This isn't part of a domain - nothing is set up beyond the initial install and normal Windows updates. The boot disk is an MX500 SSD attached to SATA5 with 2 4TB 3.5" drives in the cage. I was seeing ~20% CPU utilization for the SYSTEM process and ~22% for SYSTEM INTERRUPTS. I tracked that down to the vEthernet device. When I uninstalled HyperV and removed the vEthernet device it dropped down to ~12.5% CPU for SYSTEM and ~2.5% CPU for SYSTEM INTERRUPTS. Note that this is looking at the task manager performance tab. If I right click on SYSTEM and select Go To Details it shows SYSTEM taking about 6% CPU and SYSTEM INTERRUPTS taking about 2%. I don't know what causes this discrepancy. Running LatencyMon (for about a 30 second run) shows Highest measused time: 343 Highest reported ISR time: 33.8 (storport.sys) Highest reported DPC time: 212.3 (ndis.sys) Total hard page fault: 26 I'm not sure how to track down the source of the SYSTEM process CPU usage. I don't see anything unusual in the event logs. Truthfully I'm more concerned about the SYSTEM CPU usage, but both seem high to me for a server that is basically just sitting there. Is there something strange going on or is this just the cost of running Server 2019 on a relatively low performance CPU? This server is replacing Home Server 2011 on a MediaSmart EX495 and idle CPU on that was about 3-5%. I have installed bios ZA10A360, chipset driver WS2012R2_W8_1, AMD Chipset Graphic Driver 17.1.1, and the Broadcom NX1 driver (cp031155) - all from the HP site. Not sure what else to try. Is this normal for Server 2019 with no load? Thanks in advance for any advice, -Jim
  25. 1 point
    $149 and 6 months of YouTube Premium. That is a great deal. Store.google.com
  26. 1 point
    Recently I added a P420 to my GEN8. But this also increased the case fan speed, even when it was idle. The P420 looks like it has been designed to add a fan on top of the heatsink. With a cheap fan on the heatsink I was able to reduce the temperature to 60°C while under load. For anyone interested, the .stl can be found here: http://www.thingiverse.com/thing:1284618 And some pics can be found here: http://imgur.com/a/MPAEL PS: Thanks to everyone providing your knowledge in this forum, you saved me a lot of time figuring out some stuff with my GEN8!
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