Jump to content
RESET Forums (homeservershow.com)
Royco

Another Newbie networking question: switches and routers

Recommended Posts

Royco

Imagine the following situation:

A switch is connected to a router.

Two devices are connected to the same switch.

              switch    router
Device 1 --- ╔═════╗----╔═════╗
Device 2 --- ╚═════╝    ╚═════╝

If device 1 sends a request to device 2, will it reach the router or will it never pass the switch?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
itGeeks

Imagine the following situation:

A switch is connected to a router.

Two devices are connected to the same switch.

              switch    router
Device 1 --- ╔═════╗----╔═════╗
Device 2 --- ╚═════╝    ╚═════╝

If device 1 sends a request to device 2, will it reach the router or will it never pass the switch?

What are you trying to do?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Royco

What are you trying to do?

My router is limited to 4 LAN ports and I've a couple of remote devices (NAS, wifi extender) sharing same cable using a switch. I was wondering if all trafic would go through the cable connecting switch and router.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
nrf

so the multiple ports on the router are typically a switch within the router box, unless you have something really fancy. in some cases if the router's speed is low compared to the external switch, it may pay to move devices off the router to the switch. For example, if the router has a 100 mbit switch and your lan switch is gigabit, and your devices all handle gigabit it may be better to not take 'advantage' of the switch on the router.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
itGeeks

so the multiple ports on the router are typically a switch within the router box, unless you have something really fancy. in some cases if the router's speed is low compared to the external switch, it may pay to move devices off the router to the switch. For example, if the router has a 100 mbit switch and your lan switch is gigabit, and your devices all handle gigabit it may be better to not take 'advantage' of the switch on the router.

Agreed but I will also ad that best practice is not to use the switch at all on the router but rather always ad a gigabit switch and have all your devices plugged into the switch rather then the router will give you the best performance. The switch on the router should only have one device plugged into it and that's the separate gigabit switch all other ports on the router should remain not used except the WAN port which of course should have your modem plugged into it. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
jmwills

Get a real switch and don't use the router "switch" ports except to connect the switch. You network will thank you.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
nrf

Well, I was trying not to be pushy...not knowing the exact use case.

Anyway, sometimes a router may have a feature you want to apply to a specific port on its switch. Or you may have a node that does not need to access the rest of the lan and you only have so many ports on your existing switch etc. We don't always have money to throw at every problem and can live with tradeoffs in some cases...

Edited by nrf

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Royco

Interesting thoughts.

 

Could I summarize it like this? 

 

A router connects/seperates two networks, the inner LAN and outside web. 

A switch works only in the same LAN, but can direct the packets to the right place.

The router is required to assign the LAN ips.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
nrf

nothing is absolute in this business... for the last sentence, the router is the most common but not the only option for assigning lan IP addresses.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now



×
×
  • Create New...