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Dave

Synology Router RT1900ac

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Dave

Got this press release this morning. Synology will be introducing a router in June.  Read on.

 

Taipei, Taiwan—May 14, 2015—At Computex 2015 in Taipei, Taiwan, Synology® Inc. cordially invites you to visit the booth at J0518, 1/F, Taipei World Trade Center Nangang Exhibition Hall, Taiwan from June 2 to 6.

At the show, Synology will introduce its brand new Wi-Fi router – Synology Router RT1900ac. The router comes with a dazzling 1.9Gbps combined data rate, optimized coverage, and a desktop-like operating system never before seen in the router market. Rich networking features including advanced traffic control with application layer QoS and DNS-based web-filter, will be easily accessible with the intuitive software interface. In addition, with access to Synology's Package Center, users can download and install a rich selection of free, add-on applications, building their own cloud right from the router.

 

 

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HellDiverUK

Linksys tried putting apps on their routers.  Total fail.  I don't see how Synology is going to be any different.

 

Routers should be routers, no do everything machines.  Be good at routing.  Don't be mediocre at everything.

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Al_Borges

Synology has the potential of being different because:

 

1 . Their proven track record in NAS  Apps 

2.  Having seen what what has worked and not worked in the market place before.

3. having open source router software like DD-WRT available gives them a head start in making a good router. 

 

I been impressed with  the performance of my Asus Router in dealing with an attached USB drive.  Decent read write speeds etc. So I know it can be done. 

 

A decent router with the capablities of a Synology NAS would be very compelling to many of us.

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oj88

Linksys tried putting apps on their routers.  Total fail.  I don't see how Synology is going to be any different.

 

Routers should be routers, no do everything machines.  Be good at routing.  Don't be mediocre at everything.

I would probably agree with you if it's for an enterprise-type situation. But with the right execution, I think a feature-rich router is still a viable solution for home or SOHO environments. If Synology's DSM software for their NAS products is any indication, I think it could work.Then again, DSM is already a mature product.

 

That said, they will have to be priced competitively to compete with well-know players like Asus, Linksys, D-Link, et al. Being the new kid on the block as far as routing is concerned, they will have to prove themselves that they can run with the big boys. That's gonna be quite a challenge. I would think that their first router product (as with any new product) would likely be buggy.

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LoneWolf

Synology is pretty much the first name in NAS boxes.  The OS is, in a word, easy, and the support articles are generally clear.  There are so many third-tier vendors that have okay hardware but just a genuinely crappy interface, lousy documentation, and horrible support, and the money you save, you pay for in pain.

 

It will be interesting to see what Synology does with a router.  I have mixed feelings on the apps idea.  A bigger deal would be making things like VLANs and QoS easy for the home.  Having gateway-AV would be nice; ASUS does a basic version of this for free with the Trend Micro-based AiProtection features in their higher end routers, and I think this feature should seriously continue to jump from the business sector to the home.  Having a good remote acces portal akin to a VPN that doesn't compromise security would be a great feature as well.

 

Like HellDiver, I do think routers should be, well, routers.  USB printers or disks off a router will never work as good as a printer with a wired Ethernet interface, or a NAS; USB-attached is often prone to flaky behavior and poor throughput.  So I'll never do it.

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oj88

I've looked at videos of it being demo'd at Computex and I'll say... pretty impressive. I think the selling point for this router is the fool-proof UI. Like DSM, the SRM (Synology Router Manager) gives you a desktop-esque browser view with icons and windows. The features that struck me is how granular the parental, bandwidth, and filtering controls are, among others. QoS is also intuitive. If there's a device hogging the network, just click on it and lower its download/upload speed. The iPad companion app allows quick access to the router admin page.. You can change the configuration, monitor what the router is doing and even see what traffic is going through it... something like what netflow does, etc.

 

The support for running packages/apps, which seems to get some flak, are optional. Even so, they're not all bloatware. I saw a couple of packages that are an intrinsic function of a network device; such as a DNS server, if you'd rather not want the router to be just a simple DNS forwarder. Another package is a VPN server. Most other routers have this as standard. On the Synology, if you don't need it, you don't have to download it so it doesn't use up any resources.

 

Anyway, this is just their first attempt. I can only deduce (based on their NAS products) that they'll get better at it in future iterations.

 

I don't even own a Synology product and here I am, all praises to the brand. I could just maybe consider buying one in the future. Who says nothing good ever comes out of using XPEnology? And now, it just dawned on me.... XPEnology = eXPErience Synology. :)

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LoneWolf

Synology has the potential of being different because:

 

1 . Their proven track record in NAS  Apps 

2.  Having seen what what has worked and not worked in the market place before.

3. having open source router software like DD-WRT available gives them a head start in making a good router. 

 

I been impressed with  the performance of my Asus Router in dealing with an attached USB drive.  Decent read write speeds etc. So I know it can be done. 

 

A decent router with the capablities of a Synology NAS would be very compelling to many of us.

 

I'm going to respectfully disagree.  Well, let me qualify.  They might have the potential to be different. But:

 

I want my router to be my router.  That is, I want it to be a router and a rock-solid firewall.  I want WAN-to-LAN (and vice versa) throughput and I want security.  The only "apps" I consider worthwhile on a router are things like secure VPN, gateway antivirus, QoS, intrusion prevention, advanced persistent threat detection, and the other things that already go to make up a UTM solution. 

 

Beyond that, are just a potential security hole on a router IMHO.  I don't want USB sharing for storage or printers; I believe that the best-practice way to do this is on a network port, behind the network, where I can determine security (if needs be) via firewall rules.  I also believe that performance is best over Ethernet for both of those types of devices; even if USB can be made to work (which we've seen), it doesn't work as well as the best option.  I'd also rather have the redundancy that (at minimum) comes from a two-bay NAS.  I can see how apps can be useful on a NAS, when they pertain to actual storage (e.g., camera software, FTP serving, backup, etc.).

 

By the way, others have "had a head start" with DD-WRT as well.  I've seen Buffalo make an absolute mess of that head start, so I think you can succeed or fail either way.  You can do well with it, but it's not a foregone conclusion that you have a leg up just because you got to take open source existing code from someone else and run with it.

 

I like having roles for my devices; it provides some compartmentalization, and I choose devices that do what they do best, rather than being a jack of all trades, master of none.  And I'm not putting down Synology either; I like their NAS devices.

Edited by LoneWolf

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