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A Microserver to serve my Windows desktop?


juninho
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I got a G7 N54L, installed openmediavault on an SSD where the DVDRom is supposed to go.

 

But then it occured to me that truecrypt doesn't work on linux and openmediavault is linux, and my HDDs are encrypted with truecrypt!

 

All I want is to play whatever is in those hard drives, and to download torrents, to be able to do those two things from the admin interface from a browser on a windows 7 desktop on my home network, i.e. not have to use a monitor on my server, to be able to access the IP of the server and do both those things.

 

The thing is, even if I encrypted the HDDs with a linux friendly encryption algo, I still want to make them compatible with my windows desktop in case I want to move the odd HDD from the server to the desktop. And to my knowledge there are no encryption standards that work on both.

 

And then there's the downloading torrents dilemma. Again, I want the torrents to be downloaded on the microserver, but for me to arrange files and click on torrents from inside my desktop. With openmediavault, I was reading their forums and no one seems to know. Is there another server OS more adequate for me?

 

 

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Just need to ask if it is absolutely imperative that the HDDs are encrypted?

 

If not, you might also want to consider running XPEnology/Synology DSM (also Linux-based) on your Microserver. There's an existing thread about it if you're interested.

 

So, to run this solution by your requirements:

 

1. Headless? Yes, after the initial setup, you can manage the NAS from any browser on the network

2. HDD Encryption? No. I can't seem to see any workaround for this. Maybe the others can chime in...

3. It can download torrents? Yes. Once DSM is setup, open Package Center and install the Download Station app. I read somewhere that it uses Transmission as its built-in Torrent client.

4. Manage downloaded files from a networked client? Yes. You can manage the files either through the browser (DSM page > File Station) or via standard SMB/Windows fIle share for typical copy, cut and paste operation

5. HDDs natively readable in Windows? Unlikely

 

A second alternative is to install a Windows client or server OS on your Microserver and use any of the two more popular drive pooling software available... Drive Pool or Drive Bender. Both technologies store files in standard NTFS format so each disk is readable in other Windows machines.

 

Initial setup will require a monitor but once up and running, you can manage it using Remote Desktop... including managing the Torrent client.

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Just need to ask if it is absolutely imperative that the HDDs are encrypted?

 

If not, you might also want to consider running XPEnology/Synology DSM (also Linux-based) on your Microserver. There's an existing thread about it if you're interested.

 

So, to run this solution by your requirements:

 

1. Headless? Yes, after the initial setup, you can manage the NAS from any browser on the network

2. HDD Encryption? No. I can't seem to see any workaround for this. Maybe the others can chime in...

3. It can download torrents? Yes. Once DSM is setup, open Package Center and install the Download Station app. I read somewhere that it uses Transmission as its built-in Torrent client.

4. Manage downloaded files from a networked client? Yes. You can manage the files either through the browser (DSM page > File Station) or via standard SMB/Windows fIle share for typical copy, cut and paste operation

5. HDDs natively readable in Windows? Unlikely

 

A second alternative is to install a Windows client or server OS on your Microserver and use any of the two more popular drive pooling software available... Drive Pool or Drive Bender. Both technologies store files in standard NTFS format so each disk is readable in other Windows machines.

 

Initial setup will require a monitor but once up and running, you can manage it using Remote Desktop... including managing the Torrent client.

 

 

Hey thanks a lot for the input.

 

That's a bummer. All these linux based NAS like openmediavault and synology use a different file system that can't be read by Windows 7? So even if I don't use encryption, I can't browse through the files from the Win7 firefox browser and I can't watch movies and tv shows and music over the network from my desktop? Are all these people talking about their NAS systems that are based on linux using linux also on their personal computers?

 

Another issue is the SSD I have is a crappy little Intel 320 40gb SSD. Just my luck it seems that's not going to be enough for a Win2012, or is it? Can I install Win2008 instead?

 

I wanted the NAS to be in another room because one of my hdds is extremely noisy (Hitachi) and they're all moderately noisy anyways, and because I wanted to save a monitor for my desktop pc.

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I think you misunderstood. If you run XPEnology/Synology for example on the Microserver, files stored in them will be read by Windows clients on the network just fine (either through a browser or as a network share).

 

It's when you move the hard drives physically to a Windows machine is the part where it gets tricky.

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As oj88 said, your Windows clients do not need to be able to read the Linux formatted HDDs. You simply use the features of the Linux NAS to share whichever folders you want on the LAN. Every NAS OS I know of is capable of creating shares that are accessible to Windows computers. This is the most common way of setting up central media repositories.

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