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Simon_

What is the best free OS for gen 8

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Simon_

What OS can I install today for free as a total noob?

What Linux os will not give me problems with the b120i controller and will install out of the box?

 

I have been trying to get centOS to play nice but the guides are all half baked and expect me to know what to do for some steps

 

My BIOS is set to raid with an SSD in sata5 and it just needs an OS so I can run VMs on it.

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ikon

One of the hallmarks of a lot of Open Source software is that the guides are half baked. The only Linux I use now is Untangle, and I don't really have to know anything about Linux to do that. But, when I did use Linux more regularly, I found the best way to figure out how to make something work was to search and search and put tidbits from various sources together to make a clearer picture.

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Simon_

One of the hallmarks of a lot of Open Source software is that the guides are half baked. The only Linux I use now is Untangle, and I don't really have to know anything about Linux to do that. But, when I did use Linux more regularly, I found the best way to figure out how to make something work was to search and search and put tidbits from various sources together to make a clearer picture.

 

Indeed thats what my experience has also been tidbits here and there and a lot of searching and trial and error. However in my case trial and error costs more time as I might have to reformat the drives and reboot the system which seems to take an age. 

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Royco

RHEL has excellent documentation and support, but is not free (it is opensource). The free distributions have community written documentation and these sometimes are half baked.

 

Linux has a certain logic to it (for example, configurations files are located in /etc). The difficulty comes with certain programs, who supply meager information (sometimes a few cryptic 'man' lines). 

 

I think it's a matter of weighing pro and cons of the different OSs. 

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phillips321

You say about Linux but what specifically do you want to use the server for? If it's a simple home has i would try XPEnology, if it's for dev and learning I would put ESXi on it.


You say about Linux but what specifically do you want to use the server for? If it's a simple home has i would try XPEnology, if it's for dev and learning I would put ESXi on it. Oh, and FYI, both of my suggestion are Linux....they're just very specific types of linux for a specific purpose. ;-)


You say about Linux but what specifically do you want to use the server for? If it's a simple home has i would try XPEnology, if it's for dev and learning I would put ESXi on it. Oh, and FYI, both of my suggestion are Linux....they're just very specific types of linux for a specific purpose. ;-)

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scruffters

Did you try Ubuntu?

 

It is quite polished and the desktop environment is quite Mac like (if you're into that).

 

NB: You'll need to install something for graphics, because the onboard card is pants. I run mine without a GUI, so it makes no difference to me.

 

Personally I like Debian because it is properly license free - community supported. My choice is informed by running an indie development outfit. We can ship a system with Debian + our software, but not many other releases (such as Ubuntu).

 

Also, apt-get is a nice repo/package manager. Once you understand how that works, you'll find it very convenient.

 

I would also recommend ZFS on Linux, rather than bothering with B120i RAID... even if you just use it as a passthrough to make ODD SSD boot.

 

Thats my 2 pence worth.

Edited by scruffters

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scruffters

One of the hallmarks of a lot of Open Source software is that the guides are half baked.

 

 

I think the point of Open Source software is often misinterpreted. If you put more eyes on the code, things should get fixed quicker - but people hardly read manuals anymore and I don't blame them, but there is definitely an aspect of expecting everything to just work without any/much learning.

 

That said, I do tend to agree with you matey  :)

 

Another (very real problem) in Linux land is fragmentation. Its a little bit like Android - although I do not want to start an Android discussion (per se). Its just a general point.

 

Overall, having published open source tools for some time, I have never been able to figure out if the user base just thinks 'great - free stuff' or they really appreciate fact of code freedom. Only a small percentage actually buy paid support, thats one thing I can say... lol

 

My impression is that on a long enough timeline an Open Source equivalent to most softwares/services will arrive, and I think that is valuable because it creates healthy competition.

 

OP I think you'll find it rewarding if you stick with it. The communities are pretty helpful.

Edited by scruffters

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Zenon

The best free system (also for Gen8) is the one you know the best.

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AlexS

The best free system (also for Gen8) is the one you know the best.

And lower price :-) I'm using FreeBSD - real free system!

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ikon

Another (very real problem) in Linux land is fragmentation. 

 

Very true. I've often referred to it as the Baskin & Robbins OS.

 

Only a small percentage actually buy paid support, thats one thing I can say... lol

 

One of the issues with paid support is that it's an incentive to do poor documentation. The more clearly written and easy to understand the documentation for a particular software product is, the less likely someone is to need support for that product. Ergo, fewer paid support contracts.

 

Of course, all of this has come about as a result of the moving definition of open source software. Well before the OSF, people were creating open source software. At that time the idea was to share software freely with the world, with no expectation of remuneration of any kind. That definition has gradually morphed into one where people expect to be able to make a living by creating open source software. People started touting the idea that "open source" doesn't mean "free", but of course that is exactly what it meant in the beginning. The idea was that it was a labour of love, not a profit source.

 

As you pointed out, the model that many have tried is to charge for support. I recall saying to colleagues at the time that people trying to make a living this way are going to discover that it's hard to fill your belly with thanks and good wishes. The point is that it was a mistake to try to turn a model for free software into a profit center.

 

My impression is that on a long enough timeline an Open Source equivalent to most softwares/services will arrive, and I think that is valuable because it creates healthy competition.

 

There is no doubt in my mind that open source software has indeed put pressure on for-profit software companies. It pressures them to create better software, to sell it for less, to offer better support, to respond to customer complaints more quickly and completely, and to create free versions of at least some of their products. I'm quite sure there would be no free developer tools from MS if not for open source software, nor a free version of SQL Server, nor Hyper-V Server.

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