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Network File Transferring Speed.


1clicc
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1clicc, as you can see, the server and client PC do make a difference, as evidenced by the performance boost you got when you turned off antivirus, firewall, etc. This is why it's important to establish a baseline.

 

BTW, you very likely do not need to worry about a cross-over cable. These days, virtually all NICs have N-way negotiation. That means you can plug any NIC to any other NIC and they will figure out the wiring. It's been this way for quite a few years. I'm not saying there aren't any NICs that require a cross-over, but they're getting very rare.

 

I would try connecting the server directly to the client PC and see what happens. Do it after they're already up and running, so they have IP addresses. Just plug a cable between them and try PINGing each computer from the other. If the PINGs are good, try copying files both ways and see what you get. You should try copying very large files, and large groups of very small files. It makes a difference.

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Yup, the 50 IP may be an issue for me. I may put the lab on its own UTM to off load the IP.

Yeah. Well, I know for a fact that you have a "grace amount" up to 55. And IIRC, a "warning" amount up to 60.

But that still may be an issue for you.

 

However, as I have said, anything behind a NAT device will appear as one IP address, and won't count against the limit. Wireless devices would benefit from this.

Though if you need to access shared folders, it may become convoluted. 

 

All my switches are un-managed.

Newegg has NetGear switches on sale 8 port Gb switch for $24.99

I have a few of those actually, and I can attest to their quality and throughput. Worth the money (a steal even).

 

1clicc, as you can see, the server and client PC do make a difference, as evidenced by the performance boost you got when you turned off antivirus, firewall, etc. This is why it's important to establish a baseline.

That's also why I recommend the link I did:

http://forum.wegotserved.com/index.php/topic/8335-before-you-post-media-stuttering-playback-issues-performance-irregularities/

Some of the features (like the checksum and offload features) on the NIC may require additional CPU power. And if it's not designed correctly, may actually degrade your performance.

Disabling them may help. But you should definitely play around and find out what settings work for your system. 

 

Also, something as seemingly simple as updating the drivers may make a difference too.

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1clicc, as you can see, the server and client PC do make a difference, as evidenced by the performance boost you got when you turned off antivirus, firewall, etc. This is why it's important to establish a baseline.

 

BTW, you very likely do not need to worry about a cross-over cable. These days, virtually all NICs have N-way negotiation. That means you can plug any NIC to any other NIC and they will figure out the wiring. It's been this way for quite a few years. I'm not saying there aren't any NICs that require a cross-over, but they're getting very rare.

 

I would try connecting the server directly to the client PC and see what happens. Do it after they're already up and running, so they have IP addresses. Just plug a cable between them and try PINGing each computer from the other. If the PINGs are good, try copying files both ways and see what you get. You should try copying very large files, and large groups of very small files. It makes a difference.

 

Sorry i guess i haven't been keeping up with technology these days.  So i test it once again with your suggestion and got the same speed as the Asus router acting as a switch.  Lowest speed i got was 90MB/s and highest is like 98-100MB/s.  Sound about right?  I was thinking about getting the HP Procurve 1410-16G unmanage switch.  http://www.amazon.com/HP-Procurve-1410-16G-Switch-J9560A/dp/B003QR1DBO/ref=sr_1_1?s=electronics&ie=UTF8&qid=1425186778&sr=1-1&keywords=HP+Procurve+1410-16G

One quick dumb question i needed to ask, if i use an unmanage switch do i need to set static ip on every devices or can i still have my router do that?  because i have a feeling if i have my router do that dhcp i might ended back to square one?  Just kinda old school here.  Thanks fellas.

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The HP is a good switch. Regardless of managed or unmanaged switch the router can still deliver DHCP. So you do not have to set IP on all devices.

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90 to 100 MBps is pretty good I think. Most importantly, it tells you what the maximum is between those 2 computers (at least the way they're currently configured). If the Asus router is giving you the same transfer speeds as when the computers are connected directly together, then that speaks well of the Asus router, as helps confirm the generally positive impressions members have posted about them in the past.

 

As schoondoggy said, whether the switch is managed or unmanaged won't matter to the IP addresses — DHCP will work perfectly. Actually, a managed switch has more potential to mess things up than an unmanaged one does, because a managed switch can be misconfigured.

 

And again, as schoondoggy and Poppapete said, a real, dedicated Ethernet switch at the center of your LAN is the ideal way to go.

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So i went to Fry's Electronic yesterday and bought the D-Link (DGS-1024D) Unmanage switch.  Got home and hook that sucker up and tested the speed and let me tell ya!  It was fast.  115MB/s-125MB/s.  I'm happy now.  Thanks fellas i appreciate all your help.

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So i went to Fry's Electronic yesterday and bought the D-Link (DGS-1024D) Unmanage switch.  Got home and hook that sucker up and tested the speed and let me tell ya!  It was fast.  115MB/s-125MB/s.  I'm happy now.  Thanks fellas i appreciate all your help.

 

Glad it's working so well now. It's a little surprising you can get faster speeds than when the computers are connected directly together, but you can also see that a real Ethernet switch provides somewhat better performance the switch in a router.

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