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Dual CPU systems


zeeke
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Hi

 

I'm wondering if WHS does support a dual CPU system setup? I'm thinking about upgrading my current WHS to something a little more powerful when I upgrade to Vail later on. The setup I'm considering is this (or something like it):

 

Asus Z8NR-D12

2x Intel Xeon E5503

12 GB DDR3

 

This setup come with a smoking 14 SATA ports, two quad core CPUs and hopefully enough RAM to not be a bottleneck. But the question is: Will Vail support, and more be able to take advantage of the hardware?

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Sounds like a sweet system but I believe it would be overkill for WHS.

 

Well I need the power for virtualizing and I like to use WHS as the base OS.

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If you are going to do Virtualization or any other heavy lifting with the server then a Dual Core Xeon is a great base for that system, are you going to be using Dual-Core Xeon(s) so that you end up with 4 cores? The only real difference between the Xeon and their Pentium counterpart, is more cache' and the ability to have more then one on the board and them talk correctly to one another (stepping). Most of your Extreme Edition Processors are really Xeon(s) that have been put on the appropriate PGA type and the ability to have Multi-Procs removed.

 

Both of my Home servers are Multi-Core, albeit Pentium-D or Core 2 Duo based.

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If you are going to do Virtualization or any other heavy lifting with the server then a Dual Core Xeon is a great base for that system, are you going to be using Dual-Core Xeon(s) so that you end up with 4 cores? The only real difference between the Xeon and their Pentium counterpart, is more cache' and the ability to have more then one on the board and them talk correctly to one another (stepping). Most of your Extreme Edition Processors are really Xeon(s) that have been put on the appropriate PGA type and the ability to have Multi-Procs removed.

 

Both of my Home servers are Multi-Core, albeit Pentium-D or Core 2 Duo based.

 

Well that was a misprint from me, the Xeon CPUs I'm looking at are E5506, i.e I'm looking at a system with two CPUs and a total of 8 physical cores. Anyway, the question still remains. Will Vail handle that well?

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Well that was a misprint from me, the Xeon CPUs I'm looking at are E5506, i.e I'm looking at a system with two CPUs and a total of 8 physical cores. Anyway, the question still remains. Will Vail handle that well?

 

Yes it will is the short answer, as 'Vail' is based on Windows Server 2008 R2. I think it will handle up to 16 core if memory servers.

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Guest no-control

Yes Vail and Aurora "should" support multi socket boards.

 

That being said I think you're going about it backwards. I would suggest running a baremetal hypervisor (like Hyper-V), then create a VM and run WHS or vail or whatever.

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Hi

 

I'm wondering if WHS does support a dual CPU system setup? I'm thinking about upgrading my current WHS to something a little more powerful when I upgrade to Vail later on. The setup I'm considering is this (or something like it):

 

It should work, but I'm wondering why? How many VMs are you planning on running? There's a price premium on the 5000 series Xeon CPUs and motherboards; so much so that you could likely build 2 systems for less than the price of the one; one WHS box and one VM Host. The 3000 series is a more exonomical choice as it is largely based on the i5 socket 1156 platform with lower tolerances in manufacturing and more cache.

 

Even with dual cpus enabled in your VMs, you'd be surprised how many you can run. I've got an older setup based on the socket 775, and I've got a full multiserver SharePoint 2010 setup running acrossed 4 VMs. I have more issues with memory pressure and hard drive performance than I do CPU.

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It should work, but I'm wondering why? How many VMs are you planning on running? There's a price premium on the 5000 series Xeon CPUs and motherboards; so much so that you could likely build 2 systems for less than the price of the one; one WHS box and one VM Host. The 3000 series is a more exonomical choice as it is largely based on the i5 socket 1156 platform with lower tolerances in manufacturing and more cache.

 

Even with dual cpus enabled in your VMs, you'd be surprised how many you can run. I've got an older setup based on the socket 775, and I've got a full multiserver SharePoint 2010 setup running acrossed 4 VMs. I have more issues with memory pressure and hard drive performance than I do CPU.

 

Yes, I have considered building a quad core rig instead and put the "leftovers" towards more ECC memory. Another route would be to get a last gen Mac Pro and run OSX Server on it. However I do like the drive extender functionality of WHS.

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However I do like the drive extender functionality of WHS.

 

FYI, at least with the v1 product, you won't be able to put VMs on any of the drive extender drives. You're pretty much locked into whatever you have allocated as the "D" drive as its the only local path you'll have access to. This may change once Vail releases, but its kinda early to say for sure.

 

In the end, I would seriously recommend either building a VM host box and virtualizing WHS or having two separate boxes, one for VMs and one for WHS. After my own personal experimentation, I went with the latter.

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