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We need to make a distinction here between IP cameras and analog cameras. As long as we're talking IP cameras then, yes, AFAIK there can be a difference in that some cameras do more in-camera compression that others. If the NVR software  recognizes such cameras properly, it can cut down on the CPU load on the NVR. However, from what I recall, most of these cameras cost quite a bit more than what most home users want to spend.

 

It's one of the reasons systems like those make by Honeywell are able to handle up to 32 cameras (although 16 cameras is more reasonable for high frame rate, high resolution situations).

 

Which brings me to a huge omission I made earlier. I forgot the mention frame rate. This is huge. Changing the frame rate alters the load on the NVR tremendously. For example, Honeywell has a 'camera calculator' that helps people configure systems, letting them try different NVR, camera, resolution, and frame rate combinations. Frame rate is one of the most influential factors used by the calculator.

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We could go on and on with this. Another big factor is the "pre trigger frame rate buffer". This allows you see a preset # of frames before the trigger event.  I find it very useful but very resource intensive. Bottom line is you have to do a lot of research on what hardware is required for your camera set and then you are sure to get it wrong the first time.

 

But all this stuff is available in the right threads and forums.

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We could go on and on with this. Another big factor is the "pre trigger frame rate buffer". This allows you see a preset # of frames before the trigger event.  I find it very useful but very resource intensive. Bottom line is you have to do a lot of research on what hardware is required for your camera set and then you are sure to get it wrong the first time.

 

But all this stuff is available in the right threads and forums.

Very resource intensive.

And IIRC, on software solutions such as BlueIris, it's recommended to use Direct To Disk for the write method. 

This cuts down on conversion of the streams to a more recognizable format (but BlueIris's bvr format is very small comparatively, and you can "export" to other formats later, if you need to). 

 

 

As for CPU load, I have 6 "0.3"MP cameras (640x480), with most of them running at 20fps. 

I'm using a "quad core" AMD CPU (A10-6800K), and it idles at 25-40% most of the time. 

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As for CPU load, I have 6 "0.3"MP cameras (640x480), with most of them running at 20fps.

This is exactly what I have. And iSpy runs for only 9 hours a day, while the Nanny is on duty and everyone else is at work or school.

 

 

Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

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No, my cameras are literally for watching the nanny.    Well, and my teenagers who hide and refuse to do their chores.  But I don't need 720p to see that my nanny is napping on the couch, or my son isn't loading a dishwasher.

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