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N40L to Gen8 G1610T


jm7162
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Hi all,

 

First time post, i've currently got a N40L running Win Server 2012 Standard and i've just placed an order for a new Gen8 G1610T. I've got 4x3TB drives running in RAID 5 (windows software raid) and a separate drive for the OS (using the msata port) which is being backed up to an external USB HDD. 

 

Now, i have about 6TB of data on my RAID 5 partition which i don't have anywhere to store temporarily and i want to migrate everything over from one server to the other. Can anyone give me some advice on how i can do this (apart from purchasing external drives to store my current data on)?

 

I also have a P410 that i will be installing into the new server to give me some proper RAID. 

 

Thanks

 

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I think you're embarking on a very risky venture. The odds, IMHO, of losing all your data are very — to extremely — high.

 

You don't want to buy external drives? Well, that's a huge risk. For one thing, where is your backup?

 

It might be possible, if you put the Gen8 into AHCI mode, that you could move the data drives over to the new server and Import them into the new OS. I still think it's very risky though. If you were moving from an N40L to and N54L, it might be possible to simply move all the drives over as they are and have everything work. I think the Gen8 is just to0 different for that to work.

 

With the P410, I don't see any way to migrate the data over except to copy it to separate drives first. You will have to create an array using the P410 and that almost certainly will wipe out any data on the drives.

 

Whatever I do on a computer, I always try to have a way out if things go wrong. You don't appear to have a way out.

 

I realize that isn't very encouraging, but I think it's very pertinent.

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Yeah i know, my options are very limited. I think my best option is to puchase some cloud storage from google and upload it all to their before i do the migration. It'll work out cheaper than actually buying external storage.

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If you leave the Gen8 in AHCI mode you should be able to move them over. I would get all of the correct drivers ready on the OS disk prior to migration. There is no mSATA port on a N40L. are you refering to the SATA port on the motherboard? The only thing I am not sure about is whether I would move all the disks or just start with the OS disk, get it running then move the RAID set. I think you would need to move them all at once to have everything stay in sync.

You will need to do some extra work to boot from AHCI on the Gen8:

http://homeservershow.com/forums/index.php?/topic/5886-gen8-25-hdd-in-the-odd-bay-discussion/page-3#entry67539 

 

To implement the P410 you will need to wipe the drives to set up a new RAID set. Also the P410 does not talk to iLo on the Gen8.

 

The Gen8 fans can get loud in AHCI mode.

 

I would not try anything without a back up.

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I thought about cloud storage but, unless you have some insanely fast Internet connection, it will take weeks to months to copy all that data to the cloud, so I didn't recommend it ;)

 

For example, let's say your Internet provider gives you 50 MegaBit/sec upload (something almost no one has at home). And let's further assume that your Internet link is perfect. That would give you around 5 MegaBytes/sec, which would be 300 MegaBytes per minute, 18 GigaBytes per hour, 432 GigaBytes per day, 3 TeraBytes per week. So, it would take 2 weeks to upload your 6 TeraBytes. If your Internet upload is a more typical 10 or 5 MegaBit/sec then it will take 10 to 20 weeks.

 

Like schoondoggy and I said, you might/should be able to move the drives over using AHCI mode but, as we also said, you really should have a backup. Mind you, you should have a backup (preferably 3 backups, with one in another location) at all times anyway.

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RAID 5 is dangerous at best.  It shouldn't be used at all any more, especially with big drives.

 

To be honest, hardware RAID is fast becoming a thing of the past, it's not worth the bother any more.  

 

You're going to have to either buy new drives for the new server, or an external drive to back the data up on to in the meantime.  That of course presents it's own risk of the drive failing before you get the data back on to the server.

 

If I were you, I'd return the P410 and buy a pair of new 4TB drives and a DrivePool licence, job done.

Edited by HellDiverUK
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To be honest, hardware RAID is fast becoming a thing of the past, it's not worth the bother any more. 

 

Even a lot of RAID cards that are sold these days are only really used to give more SATA ports in a system, especially SATA III ports.

 

If I were you, I'd return the P410 and buy a pair of new 4TB drives and a DrivePool licence, job done.

 

Can't really argue against that. DrivePool seems to work pretty well.

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Even a lot of RAID cards that are sold these days are only really used to give more SATA ports in a system, especially SATA III ports.

 

 

Agreed, I use an LSI 9210-8i (a non-OEM M1015) in IT mode for adding 8 SATA connectors.  I wouldn't use it as a RAID card, but it's a very good SATA controller.

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RAID5 still has a life as long as you are using an intelligent controller that does drive scrubbing and can predict failures.

As drives get bigger and RAID5 rebuilds take longer RAID10 will make more sense. 

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Not saying RAID5 isn't being used schoondoggy, just that it's no longer automatic that a RAID card will be used for RAID arrays, like it used to be years ago. Back in the 90s I don't recall using a RAID card for anything but RAID; almost always RAID5.

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