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Exploration Linux HP tools


Royco
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I saw there were some HP software management tools available for RHEL 7. Here I'm logging my attempts to play with them in Centos 7.

 

I downloaded three rpms from the website:

hp-health-10.00-1688.40.rhel7.x86_64.rpm

hp-snmp-agents-10.00-2654.41.rhel7.x86_64.rpm

hp-ams-2.0.0-1372.39.rhel7.x86_64.rpm

 

And installed (only one dependency).

# rpm -ivh hp-ams*.rpm
warning: hp-ams-2.0.0-1372.39.rhel7.x86_64.rpm: Header V3 RSA/SHA1 Signature, key ID 5ce2d476: NOKEY
Preparing...                          ################################# [100%]
Updating / installing...
   1:hp-ams-2.0.0-1372.39.rhel7       ################################# [100%]
Please read the Licence Agreement for this software at

         /opt/hp/hp-ams/hp-ams.license

By not removing this package, you are accepting the terms
of the "HP Proliant Essentials Software End User License Agreement".
# rpm -ivh hp-health*.rpm
warning: hp-health-10.00-1688.40.rhel7.x86_64.rpm: Header V3 RSA/SHA1 Signature, key ID 5ce2d476: NOKEY
Preparing...                          ################################# [100%]
Updating / installing...
   1:hp-health-10.00-1688.40.rhel7    ################################# [100%]
Please read the Licence Agreement for this software at

         /opt/hp/hp-health/hp-health.license

By not removing this package, you are accepting the terms
of the "HP Proliant Essentials Software End User License Agreement".
  Using Proliant Standard
        IPMI based System Health Monitor
  Starting Proliant Standard
        IPMI based System Health Monitor (hpasmlited):
                                                           [  OK  ]
Starting hp-asrd (via systemctl):                          [  OK  ]

# yum install net-snmp
# rpm -ivh hp-snmp*.rpm
warning: hp-snmp-agents-10.00-2654.41.rhel7.x86_64.rpm: Header V3 RSA/SHA1 Signature, key ID 5ce2d476: NOKEY
Preparing...                          ################################# [100%]
Updating / installing...
   1:hp-snmp-agents-10.00-2654.41.rhel################################# [100%]
Please read the Licence Agreement for this software at

         /opt/hp/hp-snmp-agents/hp-snmp-agents.license

By not removing this package, you are accepting the terms
of the "HP Proliant Essentials Software End User License Agreement".
Note: Forwarding request to 'systemctl enable snmpd.service'.
ln -s '/usr/lib/systemd/system/snmpd.service' '/etc/systemd/system/multi-user.target.wants/snmpd.service'
Installing /opt/hp/hp-snmp-agents/nic/etc/HPcmanic.pp SELinux policy module
==============================================================================
NOTE: In order to activate the software contained in this package, you must
      type '/sbin/hpsnmpconfig' as 'root' user.
      Once configuration is completed start the agents by typing
      /etc/init.d/hp-snmp-agents start
==============================================================================

Alternative, create a repo and install using yum (yum install XXX --enablerepo HP-spp):

[HP-spp]
name=HP Software Delivery Repository for spp
baseurl=http://downloads.linux.hp.com/SDR/repo/spp/rhel/7/$basearch/current
enabled=0
gpgcheck=1
gpgkey=http://downloads.linux.hp.com/SDR/repo/spp/GPG-KEY-spp

 

# hplog -t
ID     TYPE        LOCATION      STATUS    CURRENT  THRESHOLD
 1  Basic Sensor Ambient         Normal    68F/ 20C 107F/ 42C
 2  Basic Sensor Processor Zone  Normal   104F/ 40C 158F/ 70C
 3  Basic Sensor Memory Board    Normal    86F/ 30C 188F/ 87C
 4  Basic Sensor System Board    Normal    95F/ 35C 140F/ 60C
 5  Basic Sensor System Board    Normal   143F/ 62C 221F/105C
 6  Basic Sensor System Board    Normal   113F/ 45C 154F/ 68C
 7  Basic Sensor System Board    Normal   107F/ 42C 190F/ 88C
 8  Basic Sensor System Board    Normal   ---F/---C 149F/ 65C
 9  Basic Sensor System Board    Normal   104F/ 40C 161F/ 72C
10  Basic Sensor I/O Zone        Normal   ---F/---C 212F/100C
11  Basic Sensor I/O Zone        Normal    93F/ 34C 147F/ 64C
12  Basic Sensor Chassis         Normal   104F/ 40C 154F/ 68C
13  Basic Sensor System Board    Normal   ---F/---C 212F/100C
 

 

Now reading the manuals...

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Some descriptions:

The HP System Health Application and Command Line Utilities (hp-health) is collection of applications and tools which enables monitoring of fans, power supplies, temperature sensors, and other management events. It also provides collection of command-line utilities: the ProLiant boot configuration utility (hpbootcfg), the ProLiant Management Command Line Interface Utility (hpasmcli), the ProLiant Integrated Management Log (IML) Utility (hplog), and the UID (blue) Light Utility (hpuid).

 

The HP SNMP Agents (hp-snmp-agents) is a collection of SNMP protocol based agents and tools which enables monitoring of fans, power supplies, temperature sensors and other management events via SNMP. It also provides the following: Foundation and Server agents, Storage Subsystem agents, Network Subsystem agents, the SNMP Dynamically Loaded Module, and the web support applications.

 

The HP Agentless Management Service (hp-ams) provides support for HP Integrated Lights-Out 4 (HP iLO 4) Embedded Health and Alerting.

Edited by Royco
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Nice description. I also installed this tools on my Fedora 21 systems so I can confirm that they work. RHEL7 is basically a combination of Fedora20 + Fedora 21.

 

hplog -t is usefull for temperature reading but also hplog -f to monitor the fan speed.

 

# hplog -f
ID     TYPE        LOCATION      STATUS  REDUNDANT FAN SPEED
 1  Var. Speed   System Board    Normal     N/A     Normal   ( 19)
 

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Great they work on Fedora, since Centos can lack new and home use features. RHEL don't like changes to their production system (if it ain't broke, don't fix it).

 

Other Linux users might be wondering: what does it do? Basically, these programs allow custom monitoring of your hardware. I've started playing with Nagios and using the SNMP agents to get the hardware condition. In a way you can make your own iLO interface.

1Qh2owF.png

I've one network cable plugged-out and this gives an error. 

 

HP-ams allows iLO to talk to the operating system and get information about drivers, network connections etc.

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hp-snmp-agents exploration

 

Using the SNMP protocol it's possible to obtain all kinds of data. There's an excellent tutorial here: at Oreilly.

 

The thing I found most difficult, was to locate the data. One example of a wesite tool I used. You also need to obtain a MIB file (included with check_hp nagios plugin) from HP/Compaq and add it to the right folder (I specify the MIB here with the "-m" option, but you can edit snmp config file).

snmptable -v2c -c public localhost -m CPQHLTH-MIB 1.3.6.1.4.1.232.6.2.6.8
SNMP table: CPQHLTH-MIB::cpqHeTemperatureTable
 
 cpqHeTemperatureChassis cpqHeTemperatureIndex cpqHeTemperatureLocale cpqHeTemperatureCelsius cpqHeTemperatureThreshold cpqHeTemperatureCondition cpqHeTemperatureThresholdType cpqHeTemperatureHwLocation
                       1                     1                ambient                      20                        42                        ok                       caution                          ?
                       1                     2                    cpu                      40                        70                        ok                       caution                          ?
                       1                     3                 memory                      29                        87                        ok                       caution                          ?
                       1                     4                 system                      35                        60                        ok                       caution                          ?
                       1                     5                 system                      61                       105                        ok                       caution                          ?
                       1                     6                 system                      45                        68                        ok                       caution                          ?
                       1                     7                 system                      42                        88                        ok                       caution                          ?
                       1                     9                 system                      40                        72                        ok                       caution                          ?
                       1                    11                ioBoard                      33                        64                        ok                       caution                          ?
                       1                    12                chassis                      39                        68                        ok                       caution                          ?

 

 

Now the OID:
snmpwalk -v2c -c public localhost -m CPQHLTH-MIB CPQHLTH-MIB::cpqHeTemperatureTable

You get list of item, I picked a few interesting ones:CPQHLTH-MIB::cpqHeTemperatureCelsius.1.1 = INTEGER: 20

CPQHLTH-MIB::cpqHeTemperatureCelsius.1.2 = INTEGER: 40
CPQHLTH-MIB::cpqHeTemperatureCelsius.1.3 = INTEGER: 29
CPQHLTH-MIB::cpqHeTemperatureCelsius.1.4 = INTEGER: 35
CPQHLTH-MIB::cpqHeTemperatureCelsius.1.5 = INTEGER: 61
CPQHLTH-MIB::cpqHeTemperatureCelsius.1.6 = INTEGER: 45
CPQHLTH-MIB::cpqHeTemperatureCelsius.1.7 = INTEGER: 42
CPQHLTH-MIB::cpqHeTemperatureCelsius.1.9 = INTEGER: 40
CPQHLTH-MIB::cpqHeTemperatureCelsius.1.11 = INTEGER: 33
CPQHLTH-MIB::cpqHeTemperatureCelsius.1.12 = INTEGER: 39
CPQHLTH-MIB::cpqHeTemperatureThreshold.1.1 = INTEGER: 42
CPQHLTH-MIB::cpqHeTemperatureThreshold.1.2 = INTEGER: 70
CPQHLTH-MIB::cpqHeTemperatureThreshold.1.3 = INTEGER: 87
CPQHLTH-MIB::cpqHeTemperatureThreshold.1.4 = INTEGER: 60
CPQHLTH-MIB::cpqHeTemperatureThreshold.1.5 = INTEGER: 105
CPQHLTH-MIB::cpqHeTemperatureThreshold.1.6 = INTEGER: 68
CPQHLTH-MIB::cpqHeTemperatureThreshold.1.7 = INTEGER: 88
CPQHLTH-MIB::cpqHeTemperatureThreshold.1.9 = INTEGER: 72
CPQHLTH-MIB::cpqHeTemperatureThreshold.1.11 = INTEGER: 64
CPQHLTH-MIB::cpqHeTemperatureThreshold.1.12 = INTEGER: 68
 

Now I wanted to add this value to nagios, so I could track it.

# check the ambient temperature

define service{
        use                             local-service         ; Name of service template to use
        host_name                       localhost
        service_description             Check Ambient temperature
        check_command                   check_snmp!-c public -m CPQHLTH-MIB -o CPQHLTH-MIB::cpqHeTemperatureCelsius.1.1 -w 25 -c 30
        notifications_enabled           0
        }

Together with pnp4nagios I can make graphs and follow the temperature over time.

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It is true that SNMP has all kinds of info. It's also true that SNMP is a huge, ugly, bag of hurt.

 

I knew a guy once who managed, developed, maintained, and nursed the MIBs for Mitel Corp. He could quote MIB items down something like 27 levels, but couldn't carry on a normal conversation. The man was not right in the head.

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The tables/trees are horrible! No truer word spoken.

 

Also, the security is a bit dodgy.

 

Maybe if you manage a big infrastructure with many systems, SNMP would be a easy way to monitor or manage the computers?   

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A really good app, that can be tailored, preferably with nice presets, to filter out all the chaff and give you only the stuff you really want, can make SNMP quite useful.

 

You sure don't want to dig through all that stuff yourself. I looked at it once at my boss' request. I came back the next day and told him he couldn't pay me enough to work with that stuff day in and day out. I said, "Life is too short". He laughed and said, "That bad eh? Well, if you won't get involved with it then it must be really bad." That was the last I heard about it. :)

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