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Next Version of Server delayed


jmwills
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While I agree there are situations where upgrading has no real purpose, I don't think that's generally true.

 

There is a project (I forget its name) where people are put in a situation where they have only 3 year old technology to work with. They're asked to do tasks they normally encounter in their everyday lives. Everyone is astounded by how limiting they find the tech, how long it takes to get things done, how frustrating it is. And that's with tech that's only 3 years old. Imagine 10 year old tech.

 

I invite anyone who's unsure of how much advancement has been made to try it themselves. Fire up a 10 year old computer and try to do the same work you do every day.

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I have a PC from 1998 sitting in the hall I need to recover data off for someone.  It's a Celeron 300 machine.  Slot 1.  Packard Bell.   No, I don't have anything with an IDE interface any more.  No, I don't know how I'm going to get this piece of crap working without spending money.

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I get frustrated trying to remember how to navigate around XP.

I have a PC from 1998 sitting in the hall I need to recover data off for someone.  It's a Celeron 300 machine.  Slot 1.  Packard Bell.   No, I don't have anything with an IDE interface any more.  No, I don't know how I'm going to get this piece of crap working without spending money.

Plenty of IDE to USB adapters out there for cheap money, ~$15

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Ironically I have boards with IDE on them, but I don't have a CPU to fit any of them. :(  I even have spare, brand new IDE drives, again nothing to plug them in to.

 

I'm doing this a a freebie for a friend of my mother, so I'm reluctant to spend any money at all.  It's bad enough I have to deal with this thing at all. :(

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At the old end of the spectrum, I have seen situations where an upgrade was funded because the client was unable to get spare parts for the old servers. Workstations can have the same problem - I had a client cheer over the retirement of an old Sun workstation because they could then use it for spare parts to keep the rest going. :)

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Found out the other day we had an old windows 3.1 machine still running in a back room.  Its totally disconnected from the network but they have some information on it that for some stupid reason they are refusing to migrate.  We warned them.  They gave their reasons.  We laughed. 

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Imagine 10 year old tech

I don't need to - I do so every day, since I make my living from IBM mainframes :) However, I also have a nine year old PC here, still running Windows XP (although no longer connected to the Interwebnet), which I use for CD ripping (I've yet to find a CD that it couldn't read, unlike any of the more modern machines in the household which regularly choke and refuse to see particular disks). Moreover I would be delighted to have my Nokia 6310 back in preference to the battery guzzling colour screened monstrosities that my employer has lumbered me with since. Perhaps it is because I'm an old dinosaur (my first 'PC' was a Tandy TRS-80 with 16K RAM and a cassette drive - now that I'd hate to go back to) but not all new technology is an advancement.
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Not so long ago (less than 10 years), I got a callout to a waste management company way down in the sticks.  Big company, lots of skip and bin lorries, and they also did a lot of work with tankers.  Maybe 400 trucks on the road.  Their "computer" wasn't working.

 

I went in to their huge offices, through all the fancy reception, out to the accountant's office.  There was this old granny about 75 years old who turned out to be the owner's mother.  She "did the books".  Her computer wouldn't work.  I kid you not, they were using one of the original Compaq clone PCs, 8086 thing.  It had a 30Mb RLL drive in it (a Miniscribe) that wasn't spinning up every time.  All their accounts ran on an old version of Lotus 123 on this old Compaq.  Long story short, after a day of messing I eventually got the machine running by setting it on it's side which shifted the weight on the seizing up bearings in the Miniscribe, long enough to back the whole thing up on to 3.5" floppies.  Eventually managed to find an 8-bit ISA IDE controller and an old 40Mb Seagate in the back of the store room, and reloaded everything off floppies.

 

That sent a wakeup call to the company owner, within a year they'd spent half a million putting in a huge Windows network with two or three servers, brand new desktops all round the offices, and another fortune on some fleet/business management software.

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