Jump to content
RESET Forums (homeservershow.com)

WHS 2011 Connector re-install


Recommended Posts

WHS2011 Restore is WinPE based, but you don't need to dig into WinPE (unless you want to) in order to load the drivers. Like many previous MS OS versions, there is an option to Load Drivers during the Restore process. You load the driver files onto a USB Flash Drive and the Restore Wizard will read it and load any drivers it finds to be valid. You could do this for the LSI card and the NIC; just put the driver files for each into its own folder on the flash drive.

 

I have heard about using WinZIP, 7-Zip, or WinRAR to open Intel EXE files before. I haven't tried it myself, but people do seem to say it works.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Replies 50
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

  • Goofy

    28

  • ikon

    17

  • jmwills

    5

  • Drashna Jaelre

    1

I apologize for my miscue. I replied earlier but must have done something wrong. I'll check this reply in a few minutes.

 

I was unable to get Winzip and RAR to work, but I found another program made expressly for this problem. The Intel exe was huge, and had a large number of INF files. I'm having trouble figuring out exactly which I should use, but I think the restore might clarify that issue itself. The Megaraid drivers aren't so difficult but I'll need to verify I have Vista 64. If my memory serves me, the same driver is used.

 

I have used WinPE (and RE) and loaded drivers several times. I had to get something to format the "C" even though I had to "format" the array in the firmware. This seems odd to me, but I didn't write the rules. I did buy another 1Tb drive (still in the box) in case I have to restore again on my second client. Not only is this thing an Atom D525 processor, but I had to use USB 2. Now I can go through eSata if needed.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I decided to attempt the stand-alone restore of my PC, armed with the knowledge of loading drivers. With the drivers loaded (for on-board Intel Lan chip and Megaraid disk controller card), it got to the point where WHS displays the list of files eligible for restore. There were none.

 

This is the exact symptom that led me to believe the cause was DriveBender. I could see the files from a client, but WHS stand-alone said there were none. Strange! To clarify, I used the WHS 2011 provided boot/restore program on a USB flash drive. This is the way I first attempted restore, but without knowledge of drivers. I later discovered there were no disks on my PC which was a pretty effective hint I might need a driver. I then remembered the screen asking about drivers. I catch on pretty ... uh, slow.

Link to post
Share on other sites

One other fact I forgot to include: There is a check box below the list of files for incomplete backups. If I check that box. I get a whole series of backups made right after I installed WHS. They are worthless and before I installed DriveBender. I'm unsure if the restore would actually attempt restore because when I run normal restore on a client, it fails right after it starts. Although my PC won't boot, I believe my "C" drive is properly restored. I think it's the "system reserved" 100Mb drive that's hosed, and I'm betting the real culprit is some data area in the partition table. All I'd need to figure this out is an in-depth knowledge of NTFS partition tables... any old fool ought to know that!

Link to post
Share on other sites

I re-ran the stand-alone, looking for something I might have done wrong. I perused the help file where I discovered the word "volume" was used almost exclusively... no mention of "partition." I have a partition brain. I went back to my client and found "Disk Management" where there are GUI tools to help build volumes, partitions, and the like. I followed the "simple volume" wizard and built two volumes as requested by the client restore wizard. Whether these are partitions or not is debatable. The next iteration of restore is running. The pudding will be the results, but since this is still using my trusty USB drive, it'll be four hours from now before I know. Hopefully, I'll still be snoozing.

Link to post
Share on other sites

The distinction between partitions and volumes is somewhat subtle, and also overlaps somewhat. This article should help to explain: https://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/dd163559.aspx.

 

You are correct; the Restore should clarify which drivers to load. Just copy the whole folder structure, with the folder contents, from the Intel EXE into a folder on the USB flash drive and Restore should check each and every INF file to find ones it can use. It will then load the drivers based on the data in the INF files.

 

I just thought of something else. I believe you said you just want to get the data from your Client PC before messing with the server, correct? If so, just having the C: drive restored may be enough. You should be able to attach that drive to another Client PC, or the server itself, and read the C: drive, at which point  you could copy off all the data for safekeeping. Then, you can trash the Client PC install and start over, without losing any data.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for the link. It'll take some time to get that digested.

 

Since my restore is complete, the results do "look" better. This means the volume/partition attributes for my "C" seem more like what I think a boot volume should be with one exception. There is an attribute (on the client I used which I haven't monkeyed with) called 'System'. It is missing this attribute. I looked it up, and a X'80' at offset 0 in the partition table means 'System'. My guess is they are really saying the high order bit and not the entire byte. This kind of thing was common in the mainframe world. I never had trouble with VTOCs, and it certainly was documented, including an IBM supplied DSECT to describe it. No room for doubt there!

 

I can change this high order bit with a disk editor and try to boot again. I'll probably get to change it back, but it's worth a shot. It is possible my rather unusual way of spreading certain things around is causing grief on the "D" drive. This is a good old WD black, and I'm in the process of looking at it. I discovered a few days ago that I may have hosed it up. There are two kinds of tools to fix this problem, and I'll do it the hard way and then try the easy. The hard way uses a secondary disk and the easy way alters the partition table. If I do the easy way first, I have no chance at the first. Of course, I can always go back to my good client and restore the "D".

 

If you're wondering what I could do to a secondary drive that would alter the boot process, think about installing software that has services etc. What happens if it's on "D"?

Link to post
Share on other sites

You can install software on D: all day long, and it won't affect the boot process. The thing is, when you install the software, any services that the software installs will be installed on C:, not D:. IOW, even if you say to install a program on D:, there is often stuff that gets installed on C: anyway.

 

All this messing around with hex offsets, partitions, etc. reminds of the good old days of mainframes and CP/M (remember Move CP/M?). You really shouldn't have to mess with any of that with Windows - I never have.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks to your and others advice, my system boots now. I am not prepared to declare victory just yet because there's a lot of stuff I need to check out. One of the issues was the "C" had no active partition. When I tried to boot after that, I got the "No bootloader" message. I booted WinRE via CD and fixed that. Next thing you know, I'm looking at my desktop. How do I lose a bootloader?

 

I need to verify all my software's in place. I haven't looked at the other drives (Win Explorer view). I'm way behind in fixes, my AV has expired, and a few other minor issues are on board for tomorrow. Within a few days, I'll have an image backup going along with WHS. I have the distinct impression that many who use WHS restores have boot issues... maybe I read a skewed subset of posts. I don't think this would have been nearly as difficult had it been something other than the "C".

 

The WHS connection issue is still there, and I'll focus on that after I catch up with a few things I've been neglecting while I fought the backup/restore problem.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I suspect it is a subset of posts. I have done tons of Restores without issues. The worst I've had is that I sometimes get the message that the computer 'did not shut down properly shut down' on the first reboot of the client PC. I just acknowledge the message and reboot. Everything is fine after that.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×
×
  • Create New...