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Hot Hardware does a 6 TB Hard Drive Round-Up: WD Red, WD Green, Seagate Enterprise


SikSlayer
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http://hothardware.com/reviews/6tb-hard-drive-roundup

 

They run them through their paces, and include WD Reds and Greens. Long story short, Seagate has a model that's the fastest, but is $200 more expensive than the next fastest, from WD. It is an enterprise drive however, but I thought it was worth mentioning.

Edited by SikSlayer
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WD Red gets my vote as well.

 

Home server enthusiasts simply have a different priority than say SOHO or corporate/enterprise users. For the home, we can usually sacrifice a bit of performance for lower costs and a much lower power consumption and heat dissipation.

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The direction with disk drives is that they will use technology that will help them preform a certain function well. Single drive, RAID, surveillance and archive are four categories today. Look at how WD is branding their drives and defining their function. Greens are not recommended for RAID and Reds are not recommended for single drive. New archival drives from WD and Seagate are designed to spin up, read or write, then go back to sleep.

As time marches on I think we will see more documents like this:

http://wdc.custhelp.com/app/answers/detail/a_id/1397/~/difference-between-desktop-edition-%28wd-blue%2C-wd-green-and-wd-black%29-and-raid 

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Interesting article.

 

It begs the question of what is the difference between the red and the green other than price.  I only ever had one green and after a year StableBit scanner said it had "parked too many times'. I then stopped it parking and it seems OK. The idea of the parking was to save energy (thus Green). I am pretty sure they don't park anymore so what makes them green now. We all seem to anecdotally think they don't last as long as reds, maybe they all come from the same product line and the ones that turn out better are called red and the others green!

 

To be fair the article does not mention that the reds have TLER support which is a definite advantage in a raid situation not sure it is a help with a NAS. I don't have a NAS so I have never looked into how they operate.

 

EDIT:

 

Scoondoggy,

 

I wrote this before reading your posting. The link at the bottom of yours does refer to the TLER difference between RED and GREEN.

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I have a pair of the 4TB HGST Deskstar NAS drives.  They're fine.  They were difficult to obtain, only a few places in the UK do them, and only in low quantities.  WD are everywhere.

 

Guess it's the same reason people buy Ford cars - they're sort of cheap, they more or less do their job, and there's a dealer in every town.

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I have posted my own speculation that perhaps WD is binning drives based on QA testing and then labeling them based on the binning. However, I'm not so sure that applies to Greens vs Reds. As I understand it, Red drives have active vibration dampening. I don't think Green drives have that feature. It might apply to Black, Blue, and Green drives though; just not sure.

 

I think we need to be careful about "NAS". Some people seem to think a NAS is some kind of special device. In reality, it's just a server that provides shared storage access over a LAN. Depending on how it's configured, it's pretty easy to consider the various WHS versions as NAS'. If a computer's main purpose is to provide shared storage to clients, in my mind it's a NAS.

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