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8 TB Hard Disk for $260


Royco
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Actually, I think I *may* have seen those. 

 

My dad is/was a hoarder, so I've seen a lot of "old" technology. He's got an 8" floppy drive (and disks!) somewhere.

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Oooooh, an 8" floppy. I don't have any of those, and I haven't seen or used one since the early 80s.

 

Not sure if you know, but the 8" floppy was invented by IBM. It wasn't really intended to be used as a storage medium for small(er) computers. It's purpose was to be the initial bootup disk for 370 mainframes. It contained the micro-code that the CPU needed to get the system up and running. IBM also used them to distribute OS and micro-code updates after the system was up and running. They used to do this with a tape drive, but that was big and awkward, so the 8" floppy was born. I believe the original ones were hard-sectored, single sided, and help a whopping 72K :)

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Well it is probably more relates to me not getting into computers until the mod 90's.

Sent from my Lumia Icon via Tapatalk

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Winding back to the original post regarding the " Archive  HDD" tech

 

"From Drashna :Nope. Not for home use.

These are "archival" disks, and use a technique called "shingled writes" (IIRC). Meaning that they are VERY VERY VERY bad for random access. Data should only be written to it once and then stored (cold storage).

If you're using this for storage ONLY, then they aren't a bad idea. But they will not be good for anything that remotely resembles home (or NAS) usage."

 

are there any other advantages for these type of drives    , if you are looking for static type backup  ie   archiving and then updating a few times a year ?   

IF they do hold up well "on the shelf"  are they a reasonable option ?  

 

Swinging back to memory lane :   My  Lab had an ancient machine controlled by an equally ancient PDP 8, using paper tape to load programs !!!

The problem was,   this machine was the only one left that was certified on certain parts for a military program and we werent allowed  to requalify a new machine.

Only time I was allow to shop on Ebay for spare parts !! .   We  finally got rid of it in 2001 -   at the time it was about 34 years old !!!

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Oooooh, an 8" floppy. I don't have any of those, and I haven't seen or used one since the early 80s.

 

Not sure if you know, but the 8" floppy was invented by IBM. It wasn't really intended to be used as a storage medium for small(er) computers. It's purpose was to be the initial bootup disk for 370 mainframes. It contained the micro-code that the CPU needed to get the system up and running. IBM also used them to distribute OS and micro-code updates after the system was up and running. They used to do this with a tape drive, but that was big and awkward, so the 8" floppy was born. I believe the original ones were hard-sectored, single sided, and help a whopping 72K :)

No I didn't know that. All I know that is my dad has a disk drive for it, and a stack of them. Somewhere. I don't know where I threw them... (he's a hoarder)

 

Winding back to the original post regarding the " Archive  HDD" tech

 

"From Drashna :Nope. Not for home use.

These are "archival" disks, and use a technique called "shingled writes" (IIRC). Meaning that they are VERY VERY VERY bad for random access. Data should only be written to it once and then stored (cold storage).

If you're using this for storage ONLY, then they aren't a bad idea. But they will not be good for anything that remotely resembles home (or NAS) usage."

 

are there any other advantages for these type of drives    , if you are looking for static type backup  ie   archiving and then updating a few times a year ?   

IF they do hold up well "on the shelf"  are they a reasonable option ?  

 

Swinging back to memory lane :   My  Lab had an ancient machine controlled by an equally ancient PDP 8, using paper tape to load programs !!!

The problem was,   this machine was the only one left that was certified on certain parts for a military program and we werent allowed  to requalify a new machine.

Only time I was allow to shop on Ebay for spare parts !! .   We  finally got rid of it in 2001 -   at the time it was about 34 years old !!!

They should be, depending on usage.

Also, I know of at least one person that's ordered them for using in a system (though I think for Server Backup use, which should be great for). I will inquiry about performance and such.

 

As for the PDP 8.... wow.

 

 

Also, I knew this was going to be a fun topic in response to the "tape drive" comment. :)

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