Jump to content
RESET Forums (homeservershow.com)

For Sale: 2x Seagate ST3000DM001 3TB hard drive


Drashna Jaelre
 Share

Recommended Posts

SATA III (6.0gbps), 64MB cache, 7200RPM  (formerly Seagate Backup Plus drives)

 

These are "shelled" drives (externals with the HDD removed) and have no warranty.

And I'm seeking to "liquidate" them as 5 out of 9 of these drives have failed on me in the last six months. 

(yes, Ikon, I know).

 

No SMART errors from these drives, and are otherwise report to be in good health (StableBit Scanner reports no unreadable sectors).

 

 

$60/each

Link to comment
Share on other sites

That they inherantly have more issues than retail drives, and is why they're used as external drives.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

We all know products coming off production lines vary in quality. This applies to HDDs as much as toasters, and I'm sure it comes as no surprise to anyone in these forums.

 

Even HDDs that meet the bare minimum quality standards to be considered saleable will vary in quality. My hypothesis is that drives that qualify at the lower end of the spectrum are used for external drive units, whereas HDDs that qualify at the top of the heap will be sold as other SKUs.

 

No, I can't prove this of course, but I believe the anecdotal evidence supports the idea.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I don't agree, a drive with the same part number will have the same specs. A ST3000DM001 from an external or purchased as a internal drive will have the same performance and reliability. I do believe external drives have a higher fail rate, due to handling and heat. The average user plugs in and unplugs an external regularly. They pick them up and move them around. More handling means higher chance of failure. Heat tends to be a design issue. Most externals run hot due to lacking a fan or case airflow.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I sort of agree with ikon. There's been a lot of speculation that hard disk manufacturers may be using a binning practice similar to what CPU/chip manufacturers does; Those that make it or exceed certain specification ends up being premium models while those that didn't quite make it but which still lies within acceptable thresholds, ends up as entry-level or 'bundled with' products, usually accompanied by a shorter warranty.

 

Again, just pure speculation, though not entirely implausible. It does make good business sense to minimize rejects.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I sure won't disagree with the idea that heat is an enemy of HDDs - I've posted as much many times.

 

However, I've also seen a significantly higher failure rate of OEM produced external drives versus ones that I, or my team at work, built ourselves. We even had a dozen Seagate external drives, about 7 years ago, that all failed within 4 months of each other, after only 1 1/2 years of use. We didn't have time to wait for Seagate to replace the units, as they were needed to back up computers being used in a special project, so we opened the units and replaced the failed drives with enterprise-class spares for our servers. Those drives were still running fine when we retired them, about 5 years later.

 

This experience isn't the only one we had with external drive units, but it is the one that convinced me there is something going on with external drives.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...