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Microserver in cupboard


Royco
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Silly question.

 

Did someone hide the Microserver in a cupboard? Did it get warm?

 

I'm uncertain about airflow. I don't want to cause a fire, at least not unintentionally.

 

 

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Basically, you can't put any computer in a cupboard and not have the temperature go up. If the cupboard is large enough (i.e. there is a large enough volume of air) you could get away with it, but any enclosed space is going to heat up.

 

As schoondoggy said so well, "It's all about airflow....".

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Besides being informative, I found the thread slightly amusing; we start with a simple wooden cupboard and end with adding fans, grills and hot/cold compartments. Must be engineers in the house.

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Besides being informative, I found the thread slightly amusing; we start with a simple wooden cupboard and end with adding fans, grills and hot/cold compartments. Must be engineers in the house.

 

That, and some obstinacy about understanding the nature of cooling was somewhat amusing in that thread.

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That cupboard has a reasonable amount of room. It would work even better if you had some ventilation through the shelving itself. You could drill some holes through it, or substitute the particle board with wire shelving. In addition to that, filtered inlet and outlet holes in the door, at the top and bottom, would provide even more cooling. Venting the doors is a technique I've used in the past.

 

Also, a neat trick to aid in cooling is to get a laptop cooler; one that can lay flat, like this: http://www.canadacomputers.com/advanced_search_result.php?keywords=laptop+cooler&sid=24psndv0f4noifeuui9h62olp7&x=0&y=0 or this: http://www.canadacomputers.com/product_info.php?item_id=050894 or this: http://www.canadacomputers.com/product_info.php?item_id=057475. They're USB powered so your MicroServer can power it directly. When I've used them, I've set the unit to be cooled directly on top of the cooler. They've made a surprisingly big difference.

 

I think, as schoondoggy said, the best idea is to monitor, monitor, monitor. Place a thermometer in there, near the MicroServer, and check it regularly.

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I'm doing a mprime run now to get a max temperature baseline for normal, optimal airflow, conditions. The fan is still at 6% and the cpu at 40C after a few hours crunching numbers (at 100% cpu utilisation). It's the base Intel Celeron G1610T and without an added PCI card. I expected some reaction, but it's to cool. B)

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