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MS Exchange 2013 in Hyper-V VM?


Jason
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Does anyone here have experience running Exchange 2013 in a VM under WSE12R2?  Was considering setting up to support shared contacts/calendars at home.  Also and opportunity to learn Exchange Administration.  So far, have been using Google Mail and the online calendar/contact sync between mobile devices, Outlook and gmail is pretty weak.

 

Curious whether others have tackled this.

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I would recommend going the route of outlook.com/Hotmail it uses the same structure as exchange online or plop for exchange on line if you own a domain.   It runs about 50 bucks a year per account but would be less hassle than 2013 exchange at home (I run 2 servers in an active active rule here at work and the learning curve from 2007 to 2013 is pretty steep.)

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OMG Jason. Are you really sure you want to take on the challenge of Exchange 2013?? Exchange is a massive app and there is a really steep learning curve to master it. I know many organizations where there is at least 1 staff member whose only job is Exchange administration. In most of these places, even the server guys don't touch the Exchange server(s).

 

Exchange is extremely powerful, but it can be a bear to manage. Now, don't get me wrong; it is possible to set up a basic Exchange server and do minimal admin on it, but that's like buying a Maserati to drive down the street to the corner store to buy milk.

 

Also, don't forget, I believe the current release(s) of Exchange require an MS Domain environment.

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Exchange has absolutely required a full AD domain for the past couple of versions, Exchange 2013 also requires its own server running Server 2012, no running it on the same box as the domain controller.

 

Having said all that though, it is fairly easy to set up and do simple stuff on it. The real headache comes when you want to do anything a bit more complex at which point you have to resort to typing in arcane powershell commands.

 

John

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LOL Jason. I set up the first Exchange Server we had at my employer (sometime between 1997 & 1999 I think). I was upgrading from MS Mail, the flat file mail system from MS. The MS Mail installation was an upgrade from Network Courier, a product MS bought from Vancouver-based Consumers Software for something like $20M. The story I heard is that MS told Consumers Software that they sell to MS for $20M or MS would reverse-engineer the product and make their own version and if Consumers wanted to sue MS "good luck with that".

 

Now, if yodafett thinks it's a viable objective, I will bow to his expertise but, from his post, I get the impression he thinks it's a bit crazy too.


Exchange has absolutely required a full AD domain for the past couple of versions, Exchange 2013 also requires its own server running Server 2012, no running it on the same box as the domain controller.

Having said all that though, it is fairly easy to set up and do simple stuff on it. The real headache comes when you want to do anything a bit more complex at which point you have to resort to typing in arcane powershell commands.

John

 

Thanks for the confirmation jem101.

 

Question: is PowerShell now the only way to do admin on Exchange - no more GUI admin (even though there were something like 1200 tabs)?

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It's not so much the setup as the massive number of configuration options on all those admin tabs. Jason said he wanted to install it to learn Exchange. I was simply pointing out that mastering Exchange is a huge undertaking, at least IMHO. However, if people think it's not that big of a deal, fair enough.

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If you do the setup vas an AIO box, a lot of the complexity is taken away. His biggest concern will be opening Port 25 for outbound SMTP traffic.

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If you do the setup vas an AIO box, a lot of the complexity is taken away. His biggest concern will be opening Port 25 for outbound SMTP traffic.

 

That's an excellent point. I don't know if Exchange has the ability to use alternate outbound ports. I think my ISP uses something like 685 as it's outbound port. Fortunately, my mail server supports alternate ports.

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