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hoorah

What are you guys using for HTPC SSDs?

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hoorah

I have a couple of HTPCs in use now (W7) and I'd like to improve the snappiness of them by upgrading the OS drive to an SSD.

 

The trouble I'm having is the smaller SSDs seem like a poor value.  It seems like I can regularly find 120GB drives for $80, which is usually what I use for desktops, but dropping down to 64GB only saves a few dollars in cost.  32GB drives are around $40.  I'd rather just spend extra and get a 120 at that point, it will be more useful down the road in other projects.

 

Is there a better source for smaller SSDs?  I would expect by this point to find 32GB SSDs in the proverbial 'bargain bin', not priced at a higher cost/GB than large drives.  Hmm.

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ikon

I think you are dealing with the 'scale of manufacturing' issue. That is, production of smaller SSDs has shrunk to the point that large scale manufacturing becomes impractical. Smaller scale manufacturing costs more per unit produced, so the cost per GB goes up. If it's any comfort, the same thing happened with HDDs. I clearly recall being able to buy a 1TB drive for less money than a 500GB drive.

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jmwills

Loading an OS on a 32 gig drive would not be a good decision IMO.  Not even room for growth and you will be exceeding some best practices by exceeding 80% of a volume with bits.

 

Get the bigger drive and sleep better,

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schoondoggy

120GB SSD are popping up for around $60. I just posted one in deals.

That is about the smallest drive I would use for a HTPC.

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ikon

I agree. Go for a 120GB SDD and be happy. It could well last longer too because it will have more spare sectors to swap in when needed.

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hoorah

Thanks guys.  120 GB for $60 I suppose is do-able.

 

Its not a big deal for one drive, but when looking at 3 HTPCs plus considering putting one more in service, the cost difference is 4x.  4x$60 is tolerable considering the benefits.  I will probably pick up two for now and see how much of a difference it makes, then possibly jump on another two.

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ikon

pcdoc, when using an Xbox as an extender, is that 'true' streaming: the server is actually reading the file and sending the decoded data to the extender, not the Xbox reading a file from the server and doing the decoding locally?

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hoorah

it is a bit of an apples to oranges comparison, but many are using XBOX 360's for media extenders. Cowboom.com (bestbuy) has pre-owned units for $89.99:

http://www.cowboom.com/deal-of-the-day.cfm

 

http://windows.microsoft.com/en-us/windows7/set-up-a-windows-media-center-extender

 

Right now I frequently get donations of older PCs from a few family members businesses.  They're usually slow-ish but make decent media centers with a few minor upgrades.  Mostly Core2duo era OEM boxes with 2-4GB of ram and a small-ish hard drive.

 

This setup has been working well for awhile, but as more channels are getting flagged as copy-once its becoming more difficult to run this standalone model, so I may switch to extenders in the future.

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timekills

pcdoc, when using an Xbox as an extender, is that 'true' streaming: the server is actually reading the file and sending the decoded data to the extender, not the Xbox reading a file from the server and doing the decoding locally?

 

For TV, yes. That is why extenders can watch copy-protected TV streams. As hoorah mentioned above, I quit using my HD Homerun systmes because TWC flags basically everything as "record once", meaning I can only play it back in the machine that recorded it.  Using an extender (an example of which is the Xbox 360) the stream is seen as being played "on" the machine that recorded it, even though it is being played "to" the TV connected to the extender.

 

For other video formats (MKV regardless of codec, MPEG2. MP4, etc) it is ostensibly the same, but the server PC must be able to transcode the video to a format the Xbox can play, which is why third party codec must be used to allow non-native format viewing on the Xbox. Even though your PC might be able to view an MP4 encoded MKV, without the correct codec setup your Xbox won't play it.

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