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Memory for t20


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Taffeys

I'm not so sure it's all that significant. I would doubt that they meant 10% of the total power the PC uses; more likely 10% of the power the memory uses. Compared to the whole chassis, the power used by the RAM has got to be a pretty small %.

You're probably right if you are only looking at memory. Kingston says "DDR3L memory may help you lower your server memory's power consumption by up to 15%." Have to wait for DDR4 for potentially greater savings but that's not coming anytime soon.

 

But if you're willing to pay a premium for low-TDP CPUs, high-efficiency PSUs, lower power consumption SSDs and HDDs, etc. why not go with LV memory?

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Four hours in and ESXi is running fine.

The Kingston KVR13E9/4HC tested out fine overnight on ESXi.

Power efficiency (read $$ saved, for home/office/lab machines) would be the last thing on my list when choosing DDR3L. Intel supports DDR3L at least since Sandy Bridge (at the protocol level), but fi

Some of it has to do with how much you're actually saving. A low-power HDD is likely to save more than RAM; same for the CPU, at least while it's running, which may not be very much of the time. Another factor is availability. It seems LV RAM is hard to get; low-power HDDs are common and are not really premium-priced. There's diminishing returns on these things, so I would factor in the pricing premium against the value of the power it's saving.

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Taffeys

Some of it has to do with how much you're actually saving. A low-power HDD is likely to save more than RAM; same for the CPU, at least while it's running, which may not be very much of the time. Another factor is availability. It seems LV RAM is hard to get; low-power HDDs are common and are not really premium-priced. There's diminishing returns on these things, so I would factor in the pricing premium against the value of the power it's saving.

Availability of LV DDR3 may be the real issue. Both Crucial and Kingston offer 1x8 DDR3 UDIMM ECC LV for the same price as 1.5V: Crucial for the Lenovo TS140 and Kingston for the Dell T20. Resellers usually charge more for product that has limited supply and seldom offer such product at "special" pricing. But OEM-branded memory always comes at a premium.

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Trust me, I know. I've been doing this s&%* a very long time. Crucial & Kingston may sell at the same price but, if they don't have any, they may as well be $1M each. :)

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Taffeys

Trust me, I know. I've been doing this s&%* a very long time. Crucial & Kingston may sell at the same price but, if they don't have any, they may as well be $1M each. :)

Hahaha... me too. Global Supply Chain Management since the 80's.

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Taffeys

You were probably born in the 60s :) I wrote my 1st computer program in 65 :o

Nope, born much earlier than that... lol

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Power efficiency (read $$ saved, for home/office/lab machines) would be the last thing on my list when choosing DDR3L.

Intel supports DDR3L at least since Sandy Bridge (at the protocol level), but finally got it right on Haswell. Lower voltage means better stability (for the memory module, the bus and the IMC), less heat and everything that derives from that... I can almost make an analogy to the human heart, but without going to the low extreme. Don't raise the BPM too high and cool yourself and you'll live longer.

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Taffeys

Power efficiency (read $$ saved, for home/office/lab machines) would be the last thing on my list when choosing DDR3L.

Intel supports DDR3L at least since Sandy Bridge (at the protocol level), but finally got it right on Haswell. Lower voltage means better stability (for the memory module, the bus and the IMC), less heat and everything that derives from that... I can almost make an analogy to the human heart, but without going to the low extreme. Don't raise the BPM too high and cool yourself and you'll live longer.

Good point!

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Taffeys

Update:

 

Yesterday I replaced the Pentium G3220 processor with a Xeon E3-1225 V3. I noticed the memory was now running at 1600Mhz instead of 1333Mhz.

 

Today I received the first Kingston KTD-PE316ELV/8G 8GB 1.35v Unbuffered ECC memory module (I should be receiving the remaining three early next week). After I installed the module (replacing the 4GB stock module) and booting the T20 the bios alerted me to the memory change and gave me the option to run the Dell ePSA Pre-Boot System Assessment. I let both the normal and extended tests proceed and they eventually all completed with no issues or errors. I have been running memtest86+ for the past 6 hours with no errors.

 

So far so good.

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