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NAme that cable!


Helzy
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HEy all, I need an Sff 8087 forward breakout cable with right angle sata latches, anyone know where to source? I can see a coule Chinese vendors on ebay but would rather something in NA if possible,

 

THanks!

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WOW!

I arrogantly thought that would be an easy find,,,,,,, not so much.

I can find them, but they don't have latches.

I have bought a bunch of cables from China, no issues.

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WOW!

I arrogantly thought that would be an easy find,,,,,,, not so much.

I can find them, but they don't have latches.

I have bought a bunch of cables from China, no issues.

hehe yep same, loathe to buy anything overseas at the moment, local store is trying to source one for me. Thanks for looking though, how about the ones without latches? What did you see?

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OT: Please correct me if I'm wrong. It seems that the terms JBOD and pass-thru are being interchanged. Can anyone confirm if they're the same or different?

 

This is what I know... JBOD is different from pass-thru. JBOD is somewhat like RAID0 without the striping. It fills up one drive then moves on to the next when the previous one gets full. JBOD presents the whole volume to the OS as a single logical drive. The OS doesn't see the drives directly, just the volume the controller created.

 

Pass-thru on the other hand allows the individual drives to be natively seen by the OS (and Drive Bender). This is what you need if you want to take advantage of features such as folder duplication (ie. the folder has mirror copies on at least two physical drives). For that to happen, DB should be able to access individual drives.

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oj88, it sounds like you are talking about two completely different things.  pass-thru usually refers to a type of sata cable in my experience, as opposed to crossover or backplain, and not the raid type.

 

To the OP, what if you used a straight cable and attached one (or 4) of these right-angle adapters (L-adapters)?

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16812270334

Edited by ajohnson30
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Awesome you nailed it thank you, they appear to be the correct right angle as well much appreciated. :D

Edited by Helzy
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OT: Please correct me if I'm wrong. It seems that the terms JBOD and pass-thru are being interchanged. Can anyone confirm if they're the same or different?

 

This is what I know... JBOD is different from pass-thru. JBOD is somewhat like RAID0 without the striping. It fills up one drive then moves on to the next when the previous one gets full. JBOD presents the whole volume to the OS as a single logical drive. The OS doesn't see the drives directly, just the volume the controller created.

 

Pass-thru on the other hand allows the individual drives to be natively seen by the OS (and Drive Bender). This is what you need if you want to take advantage of features such as folder duplication (ie. the folder has mirror copies on at least two physical drives). For that to happen, DB should be able to access individual drives.

 

oj88, it sounds like you are talking about two completely different things.  pass-thru usually refers to a type of sata cable in my experience, as opposed to crossover or backplain, and not the raid type.

 

To the OP, what if you used a straight cable and attached one (or 4) of these right-angle adapters (L-adapters)?

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16812270334

 

As I understand it, Passthrough is most often used to describe a technique for a Virtual Computer/Machine to gain direct access to a piece of hardware. An example is how Hyper-V can be given direct access to a hard drive -- the HDD is actually placed in Offline mode in the host OS (so the host OS can't even use it). At that point Hyper-V becomes able to see the drive. In theory, almost any device can be made available to a VM using this technique.

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