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Multiple Static IP Address from ISP


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I have "Time Warner Cable" and they provide me with 5 static IP's.  At present I do not have a server setup at all, my goal is to have it finished being built and try out the 180 day trial before I commit myself to using one.  Will my WSE2012 be able to connect to my cable modem using one of its Ethernet ports and then handle all IP assignments on my home network, including the static IP's provided by my ISP?

 

I have:

"Business Class" service with no outbound or inbound port blocking and public services are allowed

9 Computers

5 Android Phones

2 iPads

1 iPod Touch

1 Android Tablet

2 linux machines both running CentOS5 (one is a LAMP server, one is a custom system for Ham Radio)

Linksys router

Me, Wife, 2 Kids and 1 Cat for users (ok maybe not the cat)  :D

 

All the computers in the house use Windows 7 Ultimate and right now I have to have the router assigned to one of the Static IP's plugged into one of the 4 ports on the cable modem.  Then each device I want to have a public IP has to be connected to one of the other ports on the cable modem because the devices on the router cant see the cable modem's gateway in a way that allows the device to obtain a static from cable company. 

 

I am fairly well versed in computers but to the world of servers I am clueless and I am going to use this experience as a way to learn server management and some advanced networking so be patient with me.  :)

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Drashna Jaelre

the IP thing is for "public facing" IPs. If you have a router, everything behind/attached to it is considered "one IP". I believe.

And if you're using the router, you'd need for forward the ports to the server (which would need to be setup with a local static IP ideally).

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That's right, all of the devices on the LAN-side of your router are blissfully unaware of how many public IPs you have or what they are, the Linksys takes care of all that.

 

Now I'm going to guess that the ISP have given you and address similar to 24.172.43.1 with a subnet mask of 255.255.255.248 or 24.172.43.1/21 in CIDR format. That'll give you six public addresses (not sure where they get five from unless they don't count the gateway address and say that's five usable addresses) and that is the address you'll need to put into the WAN side settings on the Linksys.

 

Then it'll be up to you what you want to do (if anything) with the different public IPs

 

John

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I concur with the others. You have a pretty cushy situation. I would love to have static IPs. Unfortunately, Rogers won't give me any. They won't even allow residences to get business class service. They check your home address and, if it's not listed as commercial, you can't have business service, even if you're willing to pay.

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Yes I do have 6 address' with 5 usable!  In colorado I had residential service with Quest Communications and they gave me 16 IP's 13 usable on my residential class service.  Running FTTN and blazing speeds of 80 down and 40 up.  I loved my life there of course I had to pay $30 a month for them above and beyond my standard service of $109/monthly.  While in colorado I had an "advanced networking modem" and that box handled everything from assigning internal IP's to allowing me to grab a static ip from the WAN side of the box.  I could also assign an outside IP statically by programming the devices MAC addy into the modem then when it saw that MAC instead of assigning an address of 192.168.1.xxx it would assign the given external IP to that device.  Within the modem/router settings I could allow any or all of the externally assigned IP's access to my internal network or I could set them aside in vlan style.

 

I had hopes that if I put a windows server it would take on all the roles mentioned above and I would be back to where I was before in Denver only wihout the super fast speed :D

 

I do miss my speeds and ping times (15-18ms).  Now I am lucky to get around 16 down 11 up and a still realy good 29ms ping.

 

One thing I do have to note here is that when I use a router that has been loaded with DD-WRT software I can hook everything to the router wired or wireless I can obtain an ip from the routers DHCP or I can reach out to the modem just behind the router and get a static from it.  This would have been nice in and of itself if the windows server would allow that even I would be happy.

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I'd like to see the specs on that "Advanced Modem" and I wonder if you could supply a Normal modem and use something like TMG to handle the addressing.

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It was an Actiontec Q1000 modem, by far the most advanced modem I have ever owned.  Normally I dont like ISP provided routing equipment so I end up bridging the connection to an ethernet port but on that modem I loved using it.  Easy to program once you got used to all the features and it had a huge array of options to configure just about anythig I could ever ask for in a router/modem.

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Drashna Jaelre

I concur with the others. You have a pretty cushy situation. I would love to have static IPs. Unfortunately, Rogers won't give me any. They won't even allow residences to get business class service. They check your home address and, if it's not listed as commercial, you can't have business service, even if you're willing to pay.

Ouch, that sucks. Cox well, usually likes living up to their names... :P

But I'm on business class. It's not much better... but no blocked ports, and it's static. And I get decent upload (and by decent, I mean 4mbps..... instead of *maybe* 512kbps)

 

Though for the really advanced router, pfsense would be a good way to go. You should definitely be able to do that stuff. :)

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I can't help but ask 'why would you want a device on your LAN to have a publicly accessible IP address'? It does seem like a massive security headache to me.

 

John

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2 things I can think of right off the bat jem101:

  1. a DMZ server that acts as a go-between the Internet and your internal network. This would allow you to set up things like a photo sharing server, email server, perhaps even a dB server that are publicly accessible but still protected;
  2. have a WAN facing web server.
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