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UPS for microserver gen8


TeoCiontu
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Hi guys, 

 

I'm looking for an UPS for my server. I think for a 24/7 machine an ups it's a must. 

My main reason  is the protection of the server and to be gracefully shutdown not to keep the server alive during blackouts. 

 

What do you use, if you use any, and what do you recommend (power, brand, management, etc)?

 

Regards, 

 

teo

 

 

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I have had good luck with APC, CyberPower and HP. The output of the UPS should be sine wave. Computer power supplies that are PFC generally work best with a sine wave UPS. APC and HP have very good software in my opinion. 

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Hi Kevin, so the MS gen 8 has a power supply with PFC ? Me too I heard that for this kind of a psu the best ups is with sine wave.

Teo

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I've used an APC Back-UPS ES 700 for a couple of year now and perfect. Depends if you need to configure shutdowns for multiple networked PC's. Use APC and work too and never had an issues.

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This was exaclty the model that i was looking for but i understand that is not sine wave. Also a good friend of mine very familiarized with electronics and electricity told me that sine wave is not an issue for modern electronics because their psu are very good in filtering. He said sine wave is important for other appliances like electrical motors for example.

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Not sure about the Sine Wave spec but this always shuts down my Microservers when I've done a power outage test. I don't even use the APC software on the server as Windows 8 Pro (on my Microserver) automatically detects the UPS and shows as battery bit like a laptop does.

 

Also works with my QNAP TS-469Pro NAS that can act as the master (connected to the UPS USB) and then relay the shutdown signals to up to 6 other networked devices (with correct software on the PC). I've had graceful shutdowns on the QNAP, main Desktop PC and Microserver when I tested.

 

PS only 4 of the sockets are UPS backed, the other 4 are purely surge protected.

Edited by psikey
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Thank you for all these details. Can you tell me more how exactly you setup the master and the slave ? What sofware are you using ? I presume that you have to protect also the router/switch for keeping alive the network for the master to shutdown the slaves.

 

Thank you again,

Teo

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There is a lot of information on the internet that you should be use pure sine wave output with PFC power suppliers.  This is mainly because the power supplies are active devices and they start trying to correct for the non-sine wave output of the cheaper UPSes.  That doesn't mean they old UPS won't work.  It may mean you get some weird shutdowns when you aren't expecting it.  If you are purchasing a UPS then spend the extra on one with sine wave output. 

 

I use this one from Cyberpower http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00429N192/ref=oh_details_o08_s00_i00?ie=UTF8&psc=1 with my N40L and N54L.

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I have to admit that I'm a little bit confused. I've found also info on the internet that actually pure sine wave is not needed for computer psu. Also a friend of mine very good in this kind of things told me the same, being 100% sure. 

 

In the same time I cannot ignore advices from people like you with a lot of very good knowledge about all this kind of stuff and off course good intentions. 

 

Always I'm willing to pay extra money for psu, ups and things that are giving juice to my computers. I prefer to sacrifice budget for other things. But here in Romania the cheapest sine wave UPS it is about 300 USD ( at least what I've found till now). Exactly how much I've payed for the MSgen8.

 

Also I'm very surprised that during these days when most of psu are with active PFC, UPS manufacturers are not bringing in front of  their marketing materials the pure sine wave feature, as I would expected. 

 

I was very close to order APC Back-UPS ES 700G GR, but after I've read your advices I'm holding my horses. 

 

I'm taking very seriously your advices. 

 

Also I have to admit that till now the information that I've found regarding this matter are in vast majority just pro and con opinions, not official articles or real case studies of burned or damaged PSUs with active PFC  by non sine-wave UPS. 

 

If you have some links will be helpful to show them to my friend, maybe he is missing something. 

 

Anyway thank you for your help, I really appreciated this. 

Edited by TeoCiontu
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By the way I've found that actually the cheapest sine wave ups here in Romania is about 400$ so I had to investigate more.

 

This is what I've found on apc website on the official support section:

http://www.apc.com/site/support/index.cfm/faq/

 

"Problem #5: Connected equipment does not accept a stepped-approximated sine wave.

Investigation: This would be the case if only one of the pieces of equipment plugged into the battery backup outlets dropped while the other equipment in the battery backup outlets stay on when the unit transferred o battery power.
Solution: Back-UPS products output a step approximation of a sine wave when the unit is On Battery. While this kind of waveform is ideal for computers and computer-related equipment, it may not be compatible for other types of loads like motor loads. If you are using non-computer loads with one of the above mentioned UPS's, consult the manufacturer's specifications to determine if the equipment can run off of a ""stepped wave"". If it can't, then it will require a UPS which outputs a pure sine wave when On Battery. APC UPS single phase models which do output a Pure Sine Wave include: Smart-UPS >700VA, Matrix-UPS, and the Symmetra LX."

 

Also I've found this on the APC website regarding potential issues with PFC PSUs and non sine wave UPSs

http://www.apc.com/site/support/index.cfm/faq/

 

"What is Power Factor and Power Factor Correction?
Power factor is the percentage of electricity that is being used to do useful work. It is expressed as a ratio. For example, a power factor of 0.72 would mean only 72% of your power was being used to do useful work. Perfect power factor (which in this case is being achieved by the computer’s PFC power supply) is 1.0 (unity), meaning 100% of the power is being used for useful work. Power Factor Correction is a circuit design technique to increase the power factor of a device so that it approaches 1, or unity power factor. 

Although computer power supplies draw only a fraction of their full capacity during it’s steady state(normal operation), PFC power supplies have the potential to draw their full capability during initial inrush. ""Inrush"" or ""Inrush Current"" refers to the maximum instantaneous input current drawn by an electrical device when first turned on. "

 

Also a very good guide for choosing an ups (made by Legrand, generally relevant not only for Legrand UPSs)

http://ups.legrand.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/07/Guida_UPS_EN.pdf

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