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Seagate HDD - QNAP compatibility list


cskenney
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I have a QNAP TS-269L NAS that I have been using for a while.  I currently have 2x WD 3TB Reds in it with no problems.  During the black friday sales I purchased a Seagate ST4000DM000 4TB drive.  I figured...why not...I have a few Seagate 3TB drives running in other boxes.

 

I decided to look at the QNAP HDD compatibility list to see if the Seagate 4TB drive was listed.  I planned to throw it in the QNAP just to show that the 4TB drive would work.  I was surprised to find the Seagate drive listed under "Not Recommended Hard Drives".

 

It seems all the Seagate STx000DM00x drives are listed under not recommended.  There is a note in the remarks columns that states

 

This hard drive series initially passed our lab compatibility test and was included in the recommended HDD list. However, during the last few months, we have received an overwhelming number of support requests regarding this hard drive series. The high failure rate of this hard drives series has raised concerns over risks of data loss. Therefore, we have no choice but to remove this series from the recommended HDD list. For users who have already installed this series of HDD on their Turbo NAS, QNAP will continue to provide technical supports as requested.

 

Is it a hard drive problem or does it have something to do with the QNAP OS?  Either way it's an interesting data point that is sure to stir up debate (and emotions).

 

Compatibility list for your reference http://www.qnap.com/en/index.php?lang=en&sn=822&c=351&sc=514&t=523&n=13443&g=4&gc=18

 

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  • 2 weeks later...

And a bunch of the replies to that comment basically back up my opinion. WD is just as crappy. Every drive you buy is a gamble. Some people have better experience.

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Which is why I stick to only certain lines, such as Reds, Blacks, and REs, and why I always SpinRite every drive, no matter who made it. I think most manufacturers have forgotten how to spell Quality Control.

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I have friends that work at WD, Seagate and Toshiba. You would think they would throw insults at each other when one of them has a drive manufacturing issue, but they don't. They all know it could have been them. Every drive vendor has had issues.

I did not post the article to say Seagate is bad, they are not. It is just information. Every vendor struggles with quality on drive lines made in multiple factories. I have owned drives from almost every vendor. There have been good and bad with all.

I still believe drive handling, including shipping, is the biggest issue to drive reliability.

Compare the numbers in the Pueget Sound Computers blog post to the returns NewEgg takes, I believe the numbers would be outrageously different.

If you have a sound 3-2-1 back up practice, a drive failure should not be a big deal. Ultimately, they will fail, plan for it. 

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Agree completely about the 3-2-1. In the data world, backup is your only true friend.

 

As far as drives go, yep, every manufacturer has issues, just like car manufacturers. And, just like cars, certain models tend to be more reliable and long-lasting than others. There are always lemons, in every model line, but some lines do better overall than others. The trick is identifying the ones that do better overall. I just find it easier with WD than other makes and, no, I'm not singling out Seagate, not by a long shot.

 

I can't disagree about drive handling. Shock, heat, and vibration (a cousin of shock I guess you could say) are the mortal enemies of HDDs. The real problem, of course, is how to quantify how many drive issues are from shipping and handling vs other factors. I'm not sure there's a real way of doing it.

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Agree completely about the 3-2-1. In the data world, backup is your only true friend.

 

As far as drives go, yep, every manufacturer has issues, just like car manufacturers. And, just like cars, certain models tend to be more reliable and long-lasting than others. There are always lemons, in every model line, but some lines do better overall than others. The trick is identifying the ones that do better overall. I just find it easier with WD than other makes and, no, I'm not singling out Seagate, not by a long shot.

 

I can't disagree about drive handling. Shock, heat, and vibration (a cousin of shock I guess you could say) are the mortal enemies of HDDs. The real problem, of course, is how to quantify how many drive issues are from shipping and handling vs other factors. I'm not sure there's a real way of doing it.

Do you currently own any Seagate drives?

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I do. I have 2 right next to me and 2 on a shelf across the room. Let's see. All 4 are HP-supplied drives. They're ST31000340NS HDDs, HP model # GB1000EAGJL, Seagate part # 9CA158-784. Here's a shot I just took of them:

gallery_502_13_188907.jpg

 

The 4 in the photo are mostly used for experimenting. I have a few other Seagates around, including 2 or 3 laptop drives, but they're either in production or mounted into 1 chassis or another so they're harder to get at. I would say I have less than 10 overall (out of probably 50 - 60 drives).

 

Edit: just discovered 2 more of the Seagate-HP drives on another shelf, so that makes 6 of them. Like the other 4, these 2 aren't in production. Hey, I might have a few more than 10 Seagates in total :)

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