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adsboel

ESXI 5.5 vs Hyper-V Server on Gen8

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adsboel

Hi Guys,

 

I got the urge to install ESXi, got it running and was shocked when i got the 'cannot edit virtual machine' comment.

Am I missing something or is VMWare giving away half a tool for free ?

 

As much as I love VMWare, I am contemplating nuking the ESX and going all in a hyper-V 2012 server.

 

I love that ESXI runs very light on the box and can be stored on the interal SD card, however, it seems like a religious choice rather than a rational choice, if i cant edit my virtuals at my desire :)

 

Any suggestion on which path to take? I recon there might be tools out here, which I have missed.

 

 

Brian

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adsboel

please close the topic. I ended up going Hyper-V. I know what it does and doesn't. It just sad when you REALLY want to use ESXI and get a roadblock like you cant edit the settings of previously created machines ..grrrrr ..

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LoneWolf

While I know your issue is resolved, I'd have liked to look at it further and figure out the cause.  What were you trying to edit?  Any settings in particular?  How did you P2V the physical machine over to VMWare.

 

My biggest issue with Hyper-V Server isn't what it is, but that to run 2012 versions of it, Windows 8.x needs to be used to manage it.  Knowing that most IT departments aren't going to be doing a large scale deployment of Win8.x at this point, they are faced with having to consider using Win8 in a VM or upgrading a system or two to remotely administer their systems.  Considering that Windows 7 is going to be supported for some time, why not make a decision to release a Hyper-V Manager console for this OS that can support the much improved 2012 versions of Hyper-V server?

 

ESXi means easy management from workstations running multiple operating systems.  I like the resource usage, and I've been very satisfied with the functionality.  Given the options out there, I'd probably choose ESXi or maybe the free version of XenServer myself.

Edited by LoneWolf

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LoneWolf

Adsboel,

 

Now I get your limitation with ESXi 5.5 after reading a little more; it appears to be licensing related with the free version of ESXi, at least 5.5.

 

This has me looking between. 5.1 and Hyper-V server again. I have to find out if 5.1 has the same limitation.

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adsboel

Hyperv took some attempt to crack and open its fun side. But now its a breeze and i really enjoy it.

 

One downside, it requires alot Of tinkering to use the cool Shared vhd. Still working on that.

 

Besides this i am very happy.

 

 

Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

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adsboel

just as a helpful note.

 

the key to get cross to domain trust working, is CMDKEY.exe where you add credentials to remote host so that remote access works flawlessly regardless of domain stuff.

 

CMDKEY and open the firewall and enable remote management and finally installing remote manage tools on win8 or win8.1 and your having a very agile setup. loving it.

 

Brian

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LoneWolf

Adsboel,

 

While I know this is relevant to the original title and no longer to your choices, I found this after some research:

 

https://communities.vmware.com/thread/458054

 

https://communities.vmware.com/message/2291727#2291727

 

http://thehomeserverblog.com/home-servers/esxi-5-5-free-hypervisor-will-home-labs-survive/

 

It appears that upgrading the VMs to hardware version 10 makes them un-editable in the free version.  Bringing them back down to hardware version 8 (which is apparently what the free ESXi 5.5 works with) makes them editable again.  Usually new VMs created on the free ESXi should be version 8, but converting other VMs or P2Ving (I'm not sure what circumstances for sure) may result in a v10 guest OS.

 

I am unsure of the improvements from v8 to v10, but when I find out, I'll post that here too.

Edited by LoneWolf

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adsboel

WMWare is too pro to make such a bogus setup.

 

They should give out free LIMITED toolset and make it work end to end within the limits. However, if your going towards ESXI, I've heard you can edit it from recent versions of workstation. However, I nolonger have access to valid keys for workstation, not want to take a bet on it.

 

It truly annoys me when big companies screw up the experience so bad. its same experience you have when you boot to Windows Core the first time and realise its freaking DOS ..luckily time has passed and its powershell these days, but until you find your way to Remote server manager and all that jazz, you really feel shafted.

 

I must say, I lost my urge to go to esx now. I do not doubt its great, I just don't need it enough. I use mainly 2008 R2 licenses and they work jolly fine on hyper-v.

 

Getting Linux act nice and performing however, is no 1-2-3 as far as I know. Atleast its limited to specific version, obviously.

 

I'd love to have a FreeBSD running, but I am really happy with the setup, should that not happen. It just works, sad to say it, because I put VMWare at so high regard until 2012 came along. The main flaw, the ability to overprovision RAM, was finally fixed and that about what I need. I heard ESXI is better at passthru of hardware, but I don't really worry about that for my puny setup.

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LoneWolf

The more I read, the more ESXi looks like a poor home-lab choice.  As awesome as the full product is, requiring VCenter Server Appliance, which is a paid product (because VSphere Console is being slowly deprecated by VSphere Web Console and will be raplaced; VSWC requires the server appliance) means that one is very limited.  It's too bad, as the paid-for product is still great; you can even test other hypervisors on it, and its (IMHO) better than Hyper-V Server in a production environment if you have the budget, at least if you have more than a few VMs.

 

Hyper-V Server is free.  That's its huge advantage, and 2012R2 improves over previous versions.  As a server product, it also scales better than the Hyper-V role in regular Windows Server.  However, Microsoft continues to stubbornly push their ways of managing their product.  Windows 8 required with 2012/2012R2 for management experience, as opposed to allowing Windows 7 as well, or (gasp) creating a platform-agnostic web management console like VMWare is now doing, which would fit in with Microsoft's newest cloud marketing strategy. 

 

I think we're missing the next biggest player in the discussion though.  Citrix XenServer is now fully open-source as of version 6.2.  A brief (very non-exhaustive) search indicates HP has some support for it, including our often used go-to for drivers, the DL380p Gen8 server.

 

http://h18004.www1.hp.com/products/servers/software/citrix/hpcitrixcert.html

 

I'm intrigued, as I've briefly seen XenServer in action and was reasonably impressed.  My only issue is seeing whether I could P2V my current Windows Server 2012R2 install (it would be nice not to have to do it again, though it's not that hard) and whether I can get USB3 passthrough on XenServer.  I'm definitely going to research this more.

Edited by LoneWolf

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adsboel

seeing is believing. if I get the urge, I have a N36L to test on >)

 

Brian

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