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Anyone Who Has Changed the Heat Sink on a Gen8 MicroServer


Joe_Miner
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I liked the noctua on the side of the heat sink. I was planning 2, one on each side (push/pull air) ... Dunno if it helps .. Still waiting for my gear to arrive :)

 

 

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I use push-pull on my desktop (Thermalright TRUE Black, with Scythe fluid-dynamic bearing fans).  It works great.

 

What kind of bearings do those small Noctua fans use?  That would be a big deal to me.  Noctua makes some high quality gear, but I have always found that small fans suffer from one of the following issues:

 

-They're cheap and fail easily due to poor bearings

-They're cheap and aren't balanced, leading to premature failure

- They don't move enough air

- They're noisy either due to cheap, or due to someone building them well enough (e.g., Delta) to move a reasonable amount of air, resulting in high speeds to get the necessary airflow with a small fan.

 

Based on this, my first inclination is to actually measure the temps you're getting, both at idle, and under load, with the CPU you intend on using as your long-term one.  I'd then lap the heatsink, and measure that temperature.  If temps are reduced, I'd probably leave it unless your server is in an environment where it's just going to cook during the summer months --and then, my investigation would be into how to cool the air surrounding the server so any intake air is cool, which is as important as moving air off the heatsink.

 

Server gear is designed with loads and temperatures in mind.  Admittedly, HP doesn't directly sell the Microserver Gen8 with a Xeon, but the fact that BIOS support is there says a little something about what they probably think you and I will do.  If you're really concerned, step back to a Xeon E3 1220L v2; it's only 2 cores (4 threads), but is rated for an incredibly low 17w TDP and should still perform great due to turbo speeds up to 3.5GHz and Hyperthreading.

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  • 2 weeks later...

Still waiting for my xeon but I decided to keep the heat sink and invest in a few noctua fans and they just arrived. Holy cow they are packaged nicly. Already loving them.tPosted Image

 

 

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well, if I need spot cooling somewhere in the cabinat, I can set a small noctua. they are fairly effective for their size and kinda noiseless. Even if they did provide noise , I have speed throttle units to reduce rpm to non-noise levels.

 

How do you guys get power to the fans ? im planning to steal everything from the molex. Initially I was to take from the usb because it was on the lower board, but I don't want to strain the chipset. Any suggestions?

Edited by adsboel
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Adapting from a Molex connector certainly is a time-tested technique; can't see anything wrong with doing that. Those fans surely can't take any significant amount of power; a few watts each at worst I would imagine.

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hi guys,

 

a) how did you mount the fans on the side? I think you can squeeze in 2x40mm sidebyside .. but how to mount that to the heatsink ?

 

B) there is chipset heatsink which is the hottest item on the mobo, is it feasible to give that some airflow as well? seems burning hot.

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There are a number of ways to mount a fan to a heatsink.

 

One classic way is, if the screw holes in the fan can line up, or pretty near line up, with gaps between the fins of the heatsink, you simply drive some small screws in to attach the fan -- not bolts mind you; screws.

 

Another way is to use some strong double-sided adhesive, such as 3M VHB tape, to attach the fan. You have to be a little careful with this technique to ensure you don't get adhesive in any place where it might interfere with the fan blades. An advantage of this technique is that it isolates the fan from the heatsink a little bit, which reduces transfer of vibration from the fan. I typically use the adhesive in the 4 screw hole areas.

 

Alternately, you can simply use tape like the 3M VHB to stick an edge of the fan down to the motherboard itself, as close as you can get it to the heatsink.

 

You can also substitute silicon adhesive (e.g. silicon caulking) in place of the 3M VHB. It just requires that you support the fan in place until the adhesive has a chance to cure.

 

It's also possible to use epoxy instead of the 3M or silicon. I tend to stay away from this option because it can be pretty difficult to remove the fan if it fails.

 

I also shy away from using tie-wraps. I find they tend to distort the fans.

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I just realised Noctua NF-A4x10 FLX comes with rubber-something-you-can-squeeze-on-the-heatsink. instead of using strips or adhesive, I actually just used those and squeezed in the lower part with a teaspoon :) it works more the brilliant to keep the tiny 40mm in place and makes it easy to distance them abit from the heatsink if that's needed.

 

I placed then just outside the heatsing, 5-8mm away, so they don't rest directly on the lammels of the heatsink but push into the side of the lower part of it.. This way they are just they can be lowered 1-2 mm so they don't block the mobo when taking it out for inspection. Keeping abit of distance also means I can place fans 2 by 2 next to each other and get flow all along the heatsink ...

 

I am waiting for some more molex splitters and a 1260L, so time will tell if the setup works. I LOVE the quality of the noctuas and the sound is non existing, however, I am not impressed with performance. I have cheap china fans given double airflow, but with a pitchy noise ofcourse .. so its a balance.

 

I really like then and think when the push-pull with a set of two on each side is up and running it will give enough flow to cool the heatsink a wee bit.

 

Brian

 

 

There are a number of ways to mount a fan to a heatsink.

 

One classic way is, if the screw holes in the fan can line up, or pretty near line up, with gaps between the fins of the heatsink, you simply drive some small screws in to attach the fan -- not bolts mind you; screws.

 

Another way is to use some strong double-sided adhesive, such as 3M VHB tape, to attach the fan. You have to be a little careful with this technique to ensure you don't get adhesive in any place where it might interfere with the fan blades. An advantage of this technique is that it isolates the fan from the heatsink a little bit, which reduces transfer of vibration from the fan. I typically use the adhesive in the 4 screw hole areas.

 

Alternately, you can simply use tape like the 3M VHB to stick an edge of the fan down to the motherboard itself, as close as you can get it to the heatsink.

 

You can also substitute silicon adhesive (e.g. silicon caulking) in place of the 3M VHB. It just requires that you support the fan in place until the adhesive has a chance to cure.

 

It's also possible to use epoxy instead of the 3M or silicon. I tend to stay away from this option because it can be pretty difficult to remove the fan if it fails.

 

I also shy away from using tie-wraps. I find they tend to distort the fans.

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