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Anyone Who Has Changed the Heat Sink on a Gen8 MicroServer


Joe_Miner
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Hi guys, I am getting my hands on a 1260L. Would you use the passive heatsink for that or replace it. Personally I would prefer adding a fan of some sort, but keeping the existing, to avoid the dread of finding on that fits.

 

B.

 

With some designs, this might be great.  The size of the Microserver means that any fan added will be small, and any small fan will be noisy.  I'd leave it alone, and just keep your server in a reasonably cool spot in your house.  Adding a fan will be more trouble than it's worth.

 

Better thermal paste and a lapping job are pursuits that should help with much less effort.  If you don't care about any (existent or non-existent) warranties, lapping the CPU heatspreader will help you a little more yet.

Edited by LoneWolf
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These are the Core Temps I was seeing last week with the Passive HeatSink in Stock Condition with Xeon E3-1265LV2 -- Core temps peaked at 85C after running Prime95 35minutes - Fan at 21%

gallery_1229_67_80250.jpg

 

After Lapping +  partial 24hr burn in (total burn in for AS5 is 200hrs -- so optimal temps should be next week) + turning case fan settings to middle level -- Fan at 39%

gallery_1229_67_107947.jpg

 

10 minutes after Prime95 shutdown

gallery_1229_67_87321.jpg

 

30 minutes after Prime95 Shutdown

gallery_1229_67_9939.jpg

Edited by Joe_Miner
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Here's a picture with the Arctic Silver 5 applied to the Xeon E3-1265LV2 just before installing passive HeatSink that had been Lapped (Note: I used PhotoShop Elem9 to smear out the Serial # -- that's why there's a slight discoloration where the Ser # would be)

gallery_1229_67_412214.jpg

Edited by Joe_Miner
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Hi guys, I am getting my hands on a 1260L. Would you use the passive heatsink for that or replace it. Personally I would prefer adding a fan of some sort, but keeping the existing, to avoid the dread of finding on that fits.

 

B.

 

From what I'm seeing now with my Xeon E3-1265LV2 which is also 45W TDP like yourr E3-1260L -- if the heatsink makes good contact with the CPU and you're using good thermal paste and you crank the BIOS Fan settings up a notch I think you should be fine.  If the heatsink is really warped like mine was you may need to "lap" it like I ended up doing.  The temps I'm now seeing are encourging when stressed with Prime95.  I'll be posting more in the future what temps I'm seeing as my AS5 approaches/passes it's 200hr set-up time.

Very nice lapping job there :)

 

FWIW my original heatsink and TIM had perfect contact with the Celeron's heatspreader.

 

Thanks Overcoat!

 

Guess HP thought I needed a challenge :)

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For the none native English speakers, what is lapping ? :)

 

My goal is to keep temp in workable ranges with the Xeon running around 90-100% for 24 hours. I recon I need to install atleast a small papst-like (noiseless 40x40x10mm fan) or something to give the heatzink some relief. I'm not afraid todo mods, but I don't like chasis fan going on high.

 

Brian

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Here's an explanation of lapping: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lapping. In this case, I assume JM used a smooth, flat surface, put some sandpaper face up on it, then rubbed the heatsink against the sandpaper until its contact surface was as smooth as the one he was rubbing against. In production settings, there are very smooth, flat metal plates that are often used as the lapping master surface. At home I've done it with a heavy piece of glass.

 

Did I guess correctly JM?

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Funny how I found this post since I'm doing the exact same thing right now.
 
I too had a stock G1610T and swapped it for the same Xeon E3-1265L V2.  When I removed my heatsink it had a pretty even contact surface so either I'm really lucky or you just got a bad one.  However my heatsink also had some pretty bad machining marks but I'm too lazy to lap anything so I left it as is.  I cleaned the surface with Artic Cleaner and tinted it with AS5 as well.  Laid my 1mm bead of AS5 on the core the same too.
 
Here's where our setups differ.  I purchased a Noctua NF-A4x10 FLX fan from Amazon.com for less than $15 and mounted it to the heatsink with zip ties. Then I used a molex y-splitter to connect the fan.  The Noctua fan kit came with a low-noise adapter cable to reduce the RPMs but I didn't use it.  Even at 4500 RPMs it is only 18 dB so I can't even hear it in the case.
 
For my stress test I chose Prime95 as well but did not touch the fan speeds in the BIOS so they are currently set at default.  At the 1 hour mark of running Prime95 these were the results:
 
Fan Speed
gallery_7618_72_4533.jpg
 
ILO Temps
gallery_7618_72_6879.jpg
 
HW Monitor Pro Temps
gallery_7618_72_31089.jpg
 
Mounted Fan (Sorry for the bad pic)
gallery_7618_72_35714.jpg
 
The results aren't too bad in my opinion although I doubt I'll ever be running anything that CPU intensive on it.  If I find the time I might disconnect the fan and run it again just for comparision.

 

 
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For the none native English speakers, what is lapping ? :)

 

My goal is to keep temp in workable ranges with the Xeon running around 90-100% for 24 hours. I recon I need to install atleast a small papst-like (noiseless 40x40x10mm fan) or something to give the heatzink some relief. I'm not afraid todo mods, but I don't like chasis fan going on high.

 

Brian

 

To add a second link to the one ikon provided, TechArp has a good definition (and guide) on heatsink lapping:

 

http://www.techarp.com/showarticle.aspx?artno=433

 

Lapping removes any irregularities in a CPU heatsink's surface, as well as (if done properly) ensuring the heastink surface is completely flat.  Heatsinks can sometimes (either by warping, or in one or two cases by design like Thermalright's, which are slightly convex) be uneven.  In the case of HP's Microserver Gen8 heatsink, it's a machined block of aluminum without much special care paid to it, so the `sink is (usually, Joe_Miner's appears to be an exception) reasonably flat, but the surface is not smooth.  Wet-sanding with increasingly fine grits of sandpaper, done on a completely flat surface (some people actually use a glass plate for the purpose, though this isn't entirely necessary) can even out the finish; as you see, Joe_Miner did a great job with his, and the heatsink is now even and finished to a mirror shine.

 

Removing the irregularities = much better surface contact with the CPU and therefore better cooling.  If you don't mind voiding a CPU warranty, you can also lap the CPU heatspreader too (though I don't encourage it, especially with Ivy Bridge CPUs whose heatspreaders aren't attached as securely to the CPU as the Sandy Bridge processors).  Using better thermal paste than HP stock can also help; I'm a fan of ThermalRight's Chill Factor 3, but there are others I think are good too (Shin-Etsu, Noctua NT-H1, Arctic MX-4 to name a few).

 

Sample lapping kit (otherwise, you can go to a hobby store) from FrozenCPU:

http://www.frozencpu.com/products/2888/lag-01/FrozenCPU_Deluxe_Heatsink_Lapping_Kit.html

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