Jump to content
RESET Forums (homeservershow.com)
LoneWolf

HP Microserver Gen8 Processor FAQ

Recommended Posts

LoneWolf

Thanks - Noctua AT1, check ;)

 

Will see how flat the surface is before I bust out the sandpaper. I've never lapped before, but I have sanded before. The process doesn't look too difficult... It can't do any real harm, right, as long as I keep the sanding surface flat, and I rinse the heatsink very well to remove all metal filaments?

 

It can't do any harm if you keep it even.  Get it uneven, and temps will go up.  The surface is probably already flat --what it is not is smooth.  A light layer of good quality thermal paste however, will fill the gaps and resolve most of this.

 

The key to lapping is finding the flattest surface you can to lap on.  Serious overclockers actually use glass plates.  I would find a smooth, level surface without any warping, textures or grooves (you can use a basic bubble level to determine), and then if possible, tack down the sandpaper and skate the heatsink across it in an infinity-racetrack pattern (switch the direction you go in every so often; left to right, then right to left).  Wet-sanding is the way you want to go.  Plastic-backed sandpaper from hobby shops works great, but your local home improvement store has what you need too (just make sure it's wet/dry sandpaper).

 

Use multiple grits of sandpaper; I'd probably go 400/600/800/1000.  In between each grit, wash the heatsink off thoroughly to get rid of any grit and contamination (I used to use a toothbrush and just a bit of dishwashing liquid) and then dry it off before starting the next grit.

 

I used to do this in the early 2000's, but now performance heatsinks usually have a polished finish already, so I haven't had to do so in a long time.  I remember lapping the spreader of my Celeron 366 down to smooth copper (note the bottom picture, where there is still nickel over the copper) in order to clock it up to 550MHz (going from 66MHz to 100MHz front-side bus).

 

intel_pentium_ii_celeron_366.jpg

Edited by LoneWolf
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
stix01

Thanks - Noctua AT1, check ;)

 

Will see how flat the surface is before I bust out the sandpaper. I've never lapped before, but I have sanded before. The process doesn't look too difficult... It can't do any real harm, right, as long as I keep the sanding surface flat, and I rinse the heatsink very well to remove all metal filaments?

I'm not running the 1260L now. But it's actually cooler than the 1265L IMHO because of the thermal compound inside the cpu.

 

Running a i3 3240t now and am very happy with this chip. Also noticed a jump in read / write speeds on my B120i due to the ram running at 1600 mhz on the cache.  vs 1333 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
adsboel

I've just won an auction for a Xeon 1260L.

What have previous upgraders' experience been with needing to lap the heatsink?

G'day Melbourne,

 

Its a ripper! I just added some thermal paste and it ran fine. My Gen8 is a in a closet, so I added 2+2 side by side Noctua fans in push pull configuration. I doubt it required, I just got

carried away and found an excuse to play :) No lapping and I use the default heatsink, but as this forums shows the heatsink is sometime uneven and could benefit from lapping.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
ikon

If the heatsink is warped I would definitely lap it, or get HP to replace it. If it's already flat, why take a chance on messing it up?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
tangcla

Not too warped so I put on new thermal paste and slapped it on. It's not going to be doing anything intensive (I don't even know why I bought the processor really, sigh) so thermal throttling shouldn't be an issue.

 

Sent from my SM-G900F using Tapatalk

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Jiv_au

gelid-1u-slim2.gif

 

Otherwise I may upgrade to one of the Dell heatsinks floating around that look to have the right hole dimensions and clearance. I think these can cope with 130w TDP when well ventilated.

 

Bump for more information.

 

The product is Gelid Slim Silence AM2 (CC-SSilence-AM2)

 

Stix01 mentioned that the hole dimension might fit a Gen8, but the length is 105mm (105 x 74.5 x 28mm)

I measured the holes for the CPU heat sinker in my Gen8 as 75mm x 65mm (standard LGA1155 is 75x75).

 

Even worse, I checked the installation manual that seems to indicate that on the shorter side the holes are less than 47mm apart.

 

Has anyone actually installed this?

 

Otherwise I'm thinking of going with Zalman CNPS2x for my E3-1270v2 (TDP 69w).

I'll probably only be able to screw down one diagonal axis, but another poster (overcoat) seems to have success with a similiar fan (Akasa K25)

 

EDIT: Apologies, but there was alread a thread for the Gelid AM2 - bottom line seems to be that "it can't be done".

Edited by Jiv_au
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Ash3000k

Wonderful thanks for the info. I will be using it in a HTPC scenario but I may turn off the turbo to keep the temps down. I am going to go to the effort of lapping my heatsink as John did as this probably will aid the temperatures. I'm going to just use the optimal setting as the box lives right beside my sofa. But I think with top quality paste , lapping and the turbo off I should be ok. Otherwise I may upgrade to one of the Dell heatsinks floating around that look to have the right hole dimensions and clearance. I think these can cope with 130w TDP when well ventilated. I figure 8 2.4 threads can easily transcode 2x 1080p movies at once and this is probably the most load I will experience. Also I've seen this and have a sneaking suspicion that the hole dimensions are perfect.

gelid-1u-slim2.gif

 

Hi, what heat sink is that, do you have model name or anything mate?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
shakenfr

hello,

 

I 'm a newbie, I would like a advice to upgrade my Gen8 G1610T. I doen't use virtualization, I use Linux Mint 17.1 rebeca (mate) for my samba server. But sometime I would like to have more speed . Slow graph when I move the window and each time I move a window my Celeron increases near 100%CPU.

I would like to know which is the best way and cost to upgrade it

 

- changing the CPU for 

Intel Core i3-3220T (2.8 GHz)

for example

 

or 

- add a low profile graphic board (if I do that can I hope the CPU ressources will be used for others things)

 

or the 2 changes

 

thanks for you help

 

best

bruno

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
HellDiverUK

The Gen8 doesn't use the Intel CPU's graphics at all.  It uses the truly ancient Matrox G200 built in to the iLO chip.  I doubt any modern Linux has drivers for a 15+ year old Matrox.

 

The only way to get better graphics performance it to fit a real GPU in the PCI-E slot.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now



×
×
  • Create New...