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eSATA(SAN) vs Ethernet(NAS)


JasonP
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From what I know and understand, speed is going to be the difference.  But once you finally seed the initial data, the incrementals should not take that long.

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It's a question of speed and cost. eSATA is just a means of bringing SATA connections outside of the PC case so you can connect up external storage. eSATA will run quite a bit faster than USB although it doesn't have a standard means of supplying power which can be a pain.

 

SANs or storage area networks are entirely different beasts. A SAN may well consist of a large storage array hooked up to a number of servers using dedicated switches and multiple 10 Gigabit connections. The connection will be iSCSI or Fibrechannel (which is actually a protocol rather than a physical transport method so doesn't necessarily involve fibre at all), The switches are anything up to 5-6K each and the array enclosures and associated controllers will be many, many times that.

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So basically, eSATA is just like a physical SATA connection but to a device and not a drive.

 

Is eSATA typically faster then an ethernet connection?

 

What makes a SAN different over a NAS? Just the connections for a fast speed? SANs are typically used for disks at times right for BIG servers so that they can just be RAM and CPU?

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SAN (iSCSI or FC) as stated above is an external storage array. The storage in the array is portioned out to servers on the storage network. The LUN/drive the array dedicates to your server appears to be a physical drive within your server. As far as the OS knows the SAN provided LUN is a physical drive within the server. It needs to be formatted  and managed by the server. NAS is also an array on a network, but it has its own file system and your local OS sees it as a mapped device with a path.

You can get into iSCSI or NAS very inexpensive with a Synology box.

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  • 2 weeks later...

So basically, eSATA is just like a physical SATA connection but to a device and not a drive.

Yes and No. Yes in the sense that drives don't come with eSATA connectors so, typically, the drive would be mounted in an enclosure that has an eSATA connector. The enclosure also provides power to the drive.

No in the sense that there is such a thing as an eSATA-to-SATA data cable, so it is possible to directly connect a SATA drive to an eSATA port on a computer. There is, of course, the issue of powering the drive in this scenario.

 

 

Is eSATA typically faster then an ethernet connection?

 

Yes, for the most part -- i.e. for typical home users/enthusiasts. Most home LANs don't run faster than 1 gigabit today. Most eSATA ports run at either 3 or 6 gigabit. In higher-end situations where 10 gigabit Ethernet is used, the answer changes.

 

 

What makes a SAN different over a NAS? Just the connections for a fast speed? SANs are typically used for disks at times right for BIG servers so that they can just be RAM and CPU?

 

schoondoggy covered this very well.

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