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thevolt5

ASUS RT-AC66U File Transfer Slow Speed Issue 11-15MB :(

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Greg Welch

Downloads from my Synology and Asus AC66U  over 802.11AC to workstation using Intel AC7260 wifi card are right at 30MB download for a 3GB OS iso

 

if I go cat 6 to both I get 80-111MB

 

 

Try the transfer again with laptop right next to router

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ikon

300 Mbit is very decent for wireless.

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thevolt5

Yes I think I may have to take advantage of the AC setup on my router unfortunately my laptop is only a N wireless so best im achieving is around 12MB wireless would be very nice to upgrade my internal card in the laptop ASUS N56VZ if possible? Shame to have another large USB stick sticking out laptop adding bulk :(

 

Does anyone have a breakdown of typical transfer file speeds on optional equipment ?

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jmwills

For what you're going to spend on a new wireless card, you could run the cable.

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Just Checking

I own an Asus RT-N66U which I have also upgraded to the latest firmware revision. I have 9db High Gain Antenna's on the router to enhance the signal without overdriving the router wireless transmitter power - these routers run hot IMHO. 

 

Note - the RT-N66U router is NOT an "ac" router.  It is a N900 router supposedly capable of 450Mbit/sec on both the 2.4GHz and 5GHz band simultaneously.

 

The fastest wireless transfer speeds I have been able to achieve with a 3GB iso file have been  11MB/sec (96Mbit/sec) on the 2.4GHz band and 18MB/sec (144Mbit/sec) on the 5GHz band.  I am using an HP Elitebook 8460p laptop with an i5 processor and Sata II busses to a 5900 rpm internal HDD.  The wireless card in the laptop is dual band "n" capable and, at least capable of 300Mbit/sec transfer speed on either the 2.4GHz or 5GHz band (but not simultaneously).

 

My experience is that file transfers should only be done on the 5GHz band because it is 50% faster than the 2.4GHz band.

 

I have also tried transfering data with a Netgear WIND-4100 N900 external wireless stick in a USB 3.0 port on the laptop.   That was not as fast as the internal card of the laptop.

 

Transmitting to the laptop from the server through the Asus RT-N66U router (Downloading file) is faster than transmitting from the laptop to the server (Uploading) by about 30%.  This is probably because the HDD's on the server are Seagate Barracuda 7200rpm - 64MB cache drives, while the laptop HDD is 5900 rpm.

 

If I transfer the same file to, or from the server through the gigabit LAN ports on the Asus RT-N66U router using CAT6 ethernet line, I have transfer speeds of greater than 115MB/sec (gigabit).   It does not make any difference whether the Asus router is in-line, or not.  I also have either a Netgear GS-108 switch, or a D-Link switch in-line, those do not slow down the transfer rate either.

 

My research, and experience, on this subject has revealed that the Asus RT-N66U routers can slow down for some reason and have to be reset every few days.   This happened to me until I updated to the latest firmware version.  After that, my slow transfer speeds dissappeared. 

 

There is an active forum for these routers which is very helpful.  You might give them a try.  There are serveral open-source firmware types available for this router.  If you continue to have problems with the router, you might want to try those.  

 

I have also found that signal strength plays an extremely significant part in wireless transfer speeds.   That is why I have 9db high gain antenna's on my router instead of the standard 3db antenna's that come with the router.   The standard firmware on the Asus RT-N66U router allows you to specifically adjust the power output of the wireless transmitters for both the 2.4GHz band and 5GHz band independantly.  I found it necessary to run the 5GHz transmitter at 50% higher power output than the 2.4GHz transmitter to get equivalent signal strength at the receiver.   I run the 2.4GHz band at 80mw and the 5GHz band at 120mw.   The Asus router firmware is excellent for power management.   The maximum output for either band can be adjusted up to 200mw.   You might try changing this if you continue to have problems.

 

As a comparison, I also have a Buffalo WZR-1750 "ac" router.   This router is supposedly capable of 450Mbit/sec transfer speeds on the 2.4GHz band and 1300Mbit/sec on the 5GHz band (broadcasting 3 simultaneous signals for that total).   My real world experience for a single wireless transfer on the 2.4GHz band the fastest transfer speed I can achieve is about 15MB/sec.  On the 5GHz band, the fastest single wireless transfer speed I can achieve is 25MB/sec (200Mbit/sec).  Windows 7-64 bit OS has a wireless LAN status indicator that says it is 300Mbit/sec but I have never achieved that number in real life transfers.

 

PC magazine found that the fastest wireless transfer rate they ever achieved was 84MB/sec cumulative total for 3 streams using an Asus RT-AC66 "ac" router.  That is about 28MB/sec per stream.  Very close to my measured numbers with my Buffalo WZR-1750 router that cost 2/3 the price of the Asus.

 

If you want to try for faster speeds still, you could get the Asus RT-AC68 router which is a dual 800MHz processor device. It is rated as an AC1900 device.  That will only help on the 2.4GHz band where the signal interleaving is supposed to bring up the transfer rate to 600Mbit/sec.   All the numbers quoted are supposedly measured with 3 simultaneous streams so real world numbers for single wireless transfers are never anywhere close.  These routers are over US$200 because they are the newest thing on the market.

 

Finally, My research and my neighbors real world experience with powerline transfer devices indicates that the best anyone has achieved is about 30MB/sec (240Mbit/sec).   That is with clean lines and few, or none, other noisy devices (televisions, vacuum cleaners, AC units, refrigerators, electric stoves, microwaves, etc.) connected and running on the power lines.  The only advantage these have over new "ac" wireless routers is that you get that over longer distances (up to maybe 50 meters/160 feet away) because there is less signal attenuation.  A very good powerline transfer device set is going to cost a minimum of US$160.  The cheap ones are crap (according to my testing) and are not worth it.

 

My hard earned lesson is, stick with CAT6 ethernet lines whereever possible.  The newest and fastest wireless routers are, at best, 25% as fast as the hardwired network.

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Greg Welch

do a search for "Intel AC 7260" internal card.   it is what I use and very happy


The new wireless card can be had for a 28-35 for the internal card

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Just Checking

Have you measured the actual performance of the card for data transfers?  I am curious as to the real world performance.  Can you publish those numbers and give info about the wireless AP you are using, distance between the wireless transmitter and receiver, real world tests when there are walls and interference, etc.

 

The numbers I put out are for the maximum I find when the transmitter and receiver are 2-3 meters apart with nothing in between.   When I am 12 meters apart with a couple walls in between, the data transfer rates drop by 50%.

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ikon

That's the thing: very seldom are you going to be in a situation where you have unobstructed (line of site) access between a wireless router and its clients.

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