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Jesse

two switches in my "rack" - how best to connect them

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ikon

As a counterbalance, I had a distributed network for years. After I set up my HTPC, I noticed issues when trying to play Blu-Ray movies from my WHS2011 -- stuttering, jerkiness, lagginess. I got rid of the smaller switches around the house and went to a single centralized switch at the core of my LAN, with 'home run' cabling to every device. I've had had zero issues since.

 

In case anyone wonders, no, the distributed switches weren't cheapo, 3rd rate units; they were HP ProCurve 8-port. My single central switch is a Netgear DGS-116e.

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schoondoggy

The Dlink part number doesn't come up. Where all of your switches Gb or 10/100?

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JayBee

The trouble with distributed networks is that all those switches are going to produce a lot of broadcast chatter between themselves so unless you want to segment your home network into separate subnets to eliminate it your going to have to account for a lot of chatter that otherwise wouldn't exist on the network taking up valuable bandwidth and valuable processing time on the switches themselves which can cause slow downs in my experience.

Distributed networks are a fact of life for most businesses an when they're setup correctly they fly. Broadcast traffic wouldn't be a problem for most households but if you have a few devices all connecting to the net doing various things plus trying to stream a good quality movie you just might run into trouble... But as I said you can avoid this by segmenting your network to increase network efficiency and security.

Edited by JayBee
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ikon

The Dlink part number doesn't come up. Where all of your switches Gb or 10/100?

 

My bad. Serves me right for going off my memory. It's a Netgear GS116e: http://ca.netgear.com/business/products/switches/prosafe-plus-switches/GS116E.aspx#. I corrected my post.

 

Yes, all the switches were gigabit. The cabling was certified by a MicroTest PentaScanner. Tests using jPerf showed good throughput. I put the issues down to switch latency due to the switches not being fully manageable (which is, of course, the usual situation in home LANs -- most people won't spend $1,000+ for a switch for their home).

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twinsun

While Auto-MDIX is nice, technically cross-over cables and hard coding port settings (if one is using managed switches) is preferable to relying on throwing in any old cable and hoping it works.

 

Crossover - connects like devices.

Straight - connects different devices.

 

You can just connect another switch to your first one, just be aware that as pointed above you can be increasing your broadcast traffic. However, I'm not sure how you can eliminate that without buying Layer 3 switches and putting different devices into different VLAN's.

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oj88

Having a single 48-port switch vs. six 8-port switches doesn't change the broadcast profile of a network. Broadcast packets are typically sourced by network endpoints, seldom the switches themselves. The latter's job is to forward those broadcasts to all ports. In an environment with VLANs in place, the broadcast packets are contained within their respective VLAN.

 

Broadcast traffic is a necessary evil on any Layer-2 TCP/IP network. Protocols such as ARP and DHCP, among others, requires the use of broadcast traffic to do their jobs. Routers (Layer-3) or multi-layer switches (Layer-3 and up) are some of the network devices that in principle, never forwards broadcast packets unless you configure them to.

 

In the subject of D-Link gigabit switches, consider the 1210 series as well. It is a web-managed Layer-2 switch. I use the 1210-20. It's no Cisco Catalyst but it gets the job done better than any unmanaged switch.

Edited by oj88
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schoondoggy

I have not noticed any broadcast issues in my network. Moving my lab to a separate lab helped cut out traffic.

I was trying to find an article written by Fluke on 'reducing broadcast traffic on your network', but I cant seem to track it down.

Peer to peer networking was one of the biggest culprits of broadcast. It seems like my printers were very chatty until I turned off some of their auto-discover functions.

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Jesse

Thanks for the lessons.

 

Jesse

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