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Jesse

two switches in my "rack" - how best to connect them

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Jesse

Hello,

 

I have an HP 1810-24G V2 switch.  We have outgrown 24 ports so I am considering buying a second switch.  I know it is best not to daisy chain switches, but I cannot justify the cost of a 48 port switch, so I want connect the two 24 port switches in the best way possible. 

 

These switches do have a pair of SFP ports - can I connect them using these?  I am afraid I don't know squat about fiber...

 

Any advice is appreciated.

 

Jesse

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JayBee

Back in the day you had to use a crossover cable to connect two switches, these days most smart switches will work fine with normal straight through ethernet. What you need to do is check if your switches support Auto-MDI/MDIX. If they support Auto-MDI/MDIX it means you'll be able to go switch to switch with a normal straight through cable and not need to use a cross over cable between the two switches.

Sometimes not every port on the switch will support Auto-MDI/MDIX but you'll see a bank of 3-4 ports labelled slightly differently like "uplink" or "smartports" or something like that... These are usually the ports you use to go switch to switch.

 

Let me know if you have any other questions.

Edited by JayBee

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Jesse

Hello JayBee,

 

Thanks for your help.  Every port on the switch does support Auto-MDI/MDIX.  I do understand that a standard ethernet cable will work to connect the switches.  I am just curious as to whether I have any other (better) option for connecting them.  

 

Am I correct in understanding that it is better to connect the switches directly to each other with only one of them connecting directly to the router?

 

It looks like the fiber ports are gigabit, and are no faster than the standard RJ45 ports.  What advantage is there to them?  

 

Thanks,

 

Jesse 

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ikon

You might want to consider what options those switches have for 'port bonding/link aggregation'. The specs say they support IEEE 802.3ad Link Aggregation Control Protocol (LACP).

 

Are the SFP ports already populated with 'personality modules' or are they empty slots ready to hold modules? If they're already populated, you could get a couple of fiber cables, aggregate the ports, and get 2 Gbps between the switches.

 

Alternatively, you could take say 5 ports from each switch, aggregate them, and get 5 Gbps between the switches. This would use up 10 of your total 48 ports, leaving you 38 unused, or 14 more than you have now.

 

One of the advantages to fiber is you can much longer runs.

 

Yes, you are correct, you only connect your router to one of the switches.

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Pancakes

If it were me, i would also put all the high load items onto one switch. If you have lots of stuff that it never going to use a lot of bandwidth it may make more sense to put that on the second switch, that way you wont be bottlenecked 

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Jesse

Hello and thanks,

 

No transceivers/personality modules in the switch.  Did some searching - HOLY SMOKES THOSE THINGS ARE PRICEY.

 

Jesse

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ikon

That's why I asked. I wouldn't recommend going the fiber route for aggregation if there are no modules -- you could buy a bigger switch :)

 

So, RJ45 aggregation it is....

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Jesse

That's why I asked. I wouldn't recommend going the fiber route for aggregation if there are no modules -- you could buy a bigger switch :)

 

So, RJ45 aggregation it is....

 

Its like you are reading my mind...

 

Jesse

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ikon

LOL. Some things are just logical, no matter who is looking at them :)

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schoondoggy

I am an advocate of a distributed network.

Make your HP the core switch and move other systems off to other switches that link back to the HP. Sort of a hub and spoke concept.

In my home network, different rooms have their own switches. This also allows you to buy cheaper 5-8-16 port Gb switches.

It has worked for me. There are some good network diagrams in this thread;

http://homeservershow.com/forums/index.php?/topic/6029-your-serversinfrastructure/

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