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Migrating to a new server


Ralphie
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I've got an older eMachines that I repurposed as a WHS. Now, I need to move it to another (that I have not purchased yet...)

Several reasons:

1) I can't use IDE and SATA drives in the same computer...it's one or the other.
2) It can't handle 64 bit...so the upgrade is out for this machine...
3) I want to have more internal storage versus several USB drives
4) It only has 1 gig of ram...and a real slow processor.

Anyway....

What is the best way to migrate older data, including backups if possible from an older machine to another.

I have 5 machines (2 laptops, 1 netbook, and 2 desktops) that backup to the server. Tons of pictures, tons of music, and lot's of videos.

What is your opinion?

Thanks,

Ralph

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This should be fairly straight forward. If it were me I would do it this way. We will use Server 1 as your old box and Server2 as the new one.

1. Buy the new server that is capable of running the new version. Dell has some Inspiron 580 with Dual Core x64 processors for around $450 (refurb). Will hold two internal drives.

2. Install the new software and get the server "settled down" with updates, etc. Create a User profile on #2 that would match one on Server #1 with Admin Rights.

3. Use RDP to logon to either server. From Server #2 map a network drive back to Server #1 such as:

\\server1\Videos and do this for all shared folders.

Use a utility such as Microsoft Rich Copy and copy away.

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Buy or build a new server with 1 or 2 new hard drives to start. Once you have your new server going just back up your 5 machines like you did to the old server. Any data that you have on the old server can be stored to an external USB drive and manually transferred to the new server. Using this method you still have your old backups in place while you are getting the new server going.

Then, once you are comfortable with your new server you can salvage any usable drives from the old machine and use them in the new server or as backups.

edit - jmwills was a little faster, but I will add that I just bought a refurb Dell 580 w/ i3-540, 4Gb Ram and 1TB HD for $318 w/ tax.

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Thanks!!!

That's what I assumed I would have to do.

Is there any real advantage to buying a WHS "machine" (i.e. the Asus, Acer, HP) versus building?

I don't see it but I just thought I would elicit opinions on that...

Thanks again.

Ralph

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Of course, I was only thinking of "data" and not backups. My bad.

I have two Servers and one is a clean build and one is an Acer "factory build". No real advantage but if you have a spare box laying around, I would build it myself. I think the OS is under $100 now.

cskenney..that was an awesome buy form Dell. I am usually on the site every day looking for a deal. They had a ton of 580s with i3 processors and 8 gigs with a 1 TB drive for around $550. If they had dropped below $500...one was mine.

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Frankenbuild or OEM? Really depends on what you're after. For me, I wanted a small, quiet, adequately powered system. I had thought about throwing together a new system, but the cost of building something close to the size and performance level of the MSS EX495 got to the point where I decided I might as well spring for the the EX495. Can't say as I've regretted it. The only knock on HP's machine (and it's a minor one for me) is Twonky. Twonky is a feature I was curious about but don't really have the need for. Otherwise, I'm a satisfied customer. And if I had to do it again, I'd still buy the EX495. The thing that really cinched it for me was how cool it looks. And it is quiet.

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At least for me, the 495 has had too many "eccentricities". It is small, quiet and looks great, but it has been much more sluggish than I expected. Given a do over, I would have built my own again.

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OEMs can be a good choice if you want something purpose built without spending a lot on the customizations. My homebuild cost me quite a bit and I still don't think I got it exactly right. An OEM box will probably run about half the cost of an equivalent spec custom build.

The disadvantage is that you are stuck with the OEM specs instead of being able to size everything the way you like. OEMs do tend to limit the CPU power, so they can do the WHS role but not a lot more.

If you don't like the Mediasmarts which seem to have a lot of issues with 3.0 update, there are other makes which focus more on basics. The important thing is to know what you are buying, and with an OEM, you are buying just what's on the feature list and nothing more. With a custom build, you will have a 2003 server more or less, and it will run just about anything appropriate for that.

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Just to be clear, the MSS 3.0 updates were for the older MSS, not the EX49x series.

@awraynor - You were having issues with high CPU usage due to Twonky, HPMSSservice, and Avast. Did you ever get that cleared up?

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I uninstalled Avast and disabled Twonky. Thinking of doing a complete data backup and performing a fresh install of the OS? While my homebrew sits in the corner performing admirably.

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