Jump to content
RESET Forums (homeservershow.com)
PCEddie

Help With Installing a USB Wireless Nic on a PfSense Router

Recommended Posts

PCEddie

I have a Rosewell USB wireless network card and was trying to setup it up as a access point on my PfSense router. I have the current version of the PfSense software. I am able to see the USB wireless network card but I am missing something when trying to set it up as a access point. I have been looking on the web for instructions but not much success. What I am trying to do is setup a wireless network card and use that as my guest wifi access point. 

 

 

Not much talk about PfSense on the podcasts. It would make a interesting topic on a future podcast and a class for the meetup (just my $0.02).

 

Thanks for any assistance.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
JayBee

Is it on the list? Remember that some cards may be supported as clients only not as potential access points.
http://doc.pfsense.org/index.php/Supported_Wireless_Cards

 

getting wireless cards to play well with pfsense is an absolute pain unless you have a common card that they support. In my opinion your better off running a third nic on the pfsense box on a different subnet that a consumer access point plugs into. Set it up in pfsense to go directly out to the WAN and use that for your guests so they can't access anything on your LAN. Pfsense has been vaguely covered but perhaps an indepth episode is in order. more discussion here
http://homeservershow.com/forums/index.php?/forum/85-pfsense-untangle-linux-routers/

Probably where this thread should be moved to.

 

Edited by JayBee

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
PCEddie

That brings up a good point. For all the people who have setup a pfSense router, what USB wireless network card are you using? What I am trying to do is use a USB wireless network card and set it up on my pfSense router as a guest wireless access point. I don't want guests to have access to my network so I would like to have the wireless network on a separate ip address but bind to my WAN network card to get internet access.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
ikon

I like JayBee's idea. I think using a standard consumer router/access point, especially one that can run Tomato or DD-WRT, is a more versatile and robust solution.

 

  • You can use any NIC that pfSense supports (which will be a huge variety). If the router/access point fails, it's easily replaced (you don't have to try to find another USB wireless NIC that very likely isn't in production anymore).
     
  • Tomato and DD-WRT are MUCH better firmware options for a home router.
     
  • You don't have to hack pfSense to make the USB NIC act as an access point; you just let the router/access point do that for you, since it's already designed to do that.

     

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Dave

Does pfSense or unTangle bring additional features to the AP if it's connected to it?  Versus a standalone AP?  Personally, I have a sprawling house and have AP's everywhere.  I only have one wireless device near my router and it's purely for Airplay and nothing else.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
JayBee

Not really no, but it depends on the environment. It allows you to create things like a starbucks wifi style landing page for your access points and you can configure radius authentication. The real benefit is plugging an access point directly into a spare NIC on the pfsense box so can you tell it to bypass your LAN and go straight to WAN. Perfect for guests.

+1 for pfsense podcast ;)

Edited by JayBee

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
ikon

JayBee, I think maybe we should emphasize that, by bypassing the LAN and going straight to the WAN, it doesn't mean that the security features of pfSense or Untangle are being bypassed. The spam & virus blockers, etc. are still in force for the 'guest' segment, so your guests have the same protection as the rest of the LAN.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
JayBee

yes correct. I should have worded it better. Everything still goes through the firewall(s) it's just local network access is limited... Unless of course your a sick individual and put all your guests on a DMZ and take bets on how long it takes before they get infected.

Edited by JayBee

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
ikon

yes correct. I should have worded it better. Everything still goes through the firewall(s) it's just local network access is limited... Unless of course your a sick individual and put all your guests on a DMZ and take bets on how long it takes before they get infected.

 

Mwaahaahaaahaaaaa! :rolleyes: 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
pcdoc

I agree it is easier/better to install a third NIC treat that as a DMZ, and plug an AP into it.  This configruation gives you the option add additional devices to the DMZ should you need it. (not sure why but the option is there).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now



×
×
  • Create New...