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psikey

G8 Microserver - Be aware of Fan issue, add in cards

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fredaroony

With the P222 cabled to the internal 4 bays you should be good to go with the RAID5. You can run the SSD off the ODD SATA port, but it will run at SATA II speeds and it sounds like some of your fan issues maybe coming from that. If I were you I would run your SSD off the SFF8087 connection on the motherboard. Do you have a SFF8087 break out cable? You will need one to plug into the motherboard. You could try AHCI or B120i on the internal connection to see if either will resolve your fan issue. To run a single drive on the B120i you need to run the ACU and create a single drive RAID0.

Creating the RAID 0 with a single disk format it? Currently I am running it in AHCI mode and dont want it blown away if I create a single drive RAID 0

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gstarks

Well, let's see: the fan is to cool the system, not just the drives, cause all of it generates heat, so why not have the system control the fan? I guess the iLO controlling it is more logical; better than the RAID card anyway.

 

A single drive RAID0 is a contradiction in terms, and is in direct violation of the official definition of RAID0. Call me old-fashioned; I like things to be logical and follow the established standards. Why didn't HP just label it 'individual drive mode' or something? Also, what happens if you have multiple drives and want them all to be seen individually by the system; do you have to make multiple RAID0 arrays? On other RAID cards, the default is to just have all drives seen individually, unless you deliberately create an array of some level. BTW, just like everyone else, I'm entitled to criticise HP's implementation -- don't have to be the head of anything. You call it innovative... fair enough; I call it weird, non-standard, illogical, and non-intuitive. :)

 

You are free to call it weird ikon! :)   Admittedly, when you get into the corner cases, even with standards, things seem a little weird.  

 

In fact, the term RAID0 is a misnomer by itself: No data is redundant, yet the "R" is still present in the name.

 

Regarding Smart Array, think of it like this:  You don't have a JBOD controller, you have an array controller.   The programmers out there will confirm that an array object can have just one element and still be an array - it's an object of type array,  as opposed to an object of type integer, for example, because it has the CAPABILITY of having more elements.   So with Smart Array, the only thing you can create is arrays, and at any give time, if more drives of the same type are available, they can be added to the array. An array always has the characteristic of being able to contain multiple disks whether you use that characteristic or not.

 

Also, it's actually at the logical disk level that you assign the RAID level, so it's all virtual anyway.   It's no longer Redundant Array Inexpensive Disks, but a Redundant Array of logical chunks managed by a smart controller, but the legacy terminology is still used.  

 

When you create a logical drive, regardless of RAID 0/1/5/etc, you don't pick the number of disks, you pick the capacity.  The quantity of physical disks has been abstracted out at the array level. The RAID level specifies how the "logical" chunks will be managed across the one or more disks that are present in the array.   

 

So you could start with a array of a single 1TB disk, and create RAID0 logical drive of 500GB.   Later you add another 1TB disk to the array, the RAID0 logical disk will automatically now stripe across both disks, effectively (not literal) taking a 250GB swipe of each.   It's designated as RAID0 because that is the striping/protection method that will be applied to that logical drive when more disks are added to the underlying array.  RAID0 here means that the chunks are in no way redundant with each other, and that they are spread across all available disks in the underlying array to maximize performance.

 

So in summary, yes, you can create 4 separate arrays, each with a single drive, each with a single RAID0 logical disk.  This effective gives the OS 4 volumes like AHCI would, but you are using the HP SmartArray driver instead.  This (notwithstanding the oddness reported in this thread) gives you the advantage of rolling drive health into the HP management/alerting ecosystem.

 

Hope that helps.

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gstarks

Creating the RAID 0 with a single disk format it? Currently I am running it in AHCI mode and dont want it blown away if I create a single drive RAID 0

When you change from AHCI to Smart Array Single disk RAID0, or back, you are changing how the controller will be enumerated to the OS and therefore which driver will be used.  Per my explanation in the previous post, SmartArray is putting more info on the disk to manage the POSSIBILITY of there being more drives in the array, even if it is a single disk array.  So therefore, I'm pretty sure (but not 100%) that you won't be able to preserve a partition across drivers.

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fredaroony

When you change from AHCI to Smart Array Single disk RAID0, or back, you are changing how the controller will be enumerated to the OS and therefore which driver will be used.  Per my explanation in the previous post, SmartArray is putting more info on the disk to manage the POSSIBILITY of there being more drives in the array, even if it is a single disk array.  So therefore, I'm pretty sure (but not 100%) that you won't be able to preserve a partition across drivers.

hrmmm....just deciding if I'm game enough to try it :) The only way it may work is using the whole disk as the logical drive and I assume using anything smaller than the full capacity will blow it away for sure.

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gstarks

I'm assuming you are not sweating the idea of losing the data - meaning it could cause work to restore it, but not real data loss if it DOES get destroyed... 

 

Sounds like you are really wanting to be the guinea pig and let us know how it turns out, even if you end up having to rebuild ;)

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fredaroony

I'm assuming you are not sweating the idea of losing the data - meaning it could cause work to restore it, but not real data loss if it DOES get destroyed... 

 

Sounds like you are really wanting to be the guinea pig and let us know how it turns out, even if you end up having to rebuild ;)

It's just the boot disk and all my data is on a RAID 5 array behind an Adaptec controller so pretty safe. Still debating it in my head :) Couple hours of work to get it back to the way it was.

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ikon

gstarks, thanks for the fantastic explanation.

 

If I read it correctly, it is possible to create a 'RAID 0' using non-uniform disks: i.e. drives of different sizes. In 'true' RAID 0, of course, that's not possible, or at least the array will only utilize the capacity of each drive that matches the size of the smallest drive.

 

And, if I read correctly, the HP RAID controller is starting to blur the line between RAID Controller and Drive Pooling Software, such as DrivePool, DriveBender, flexRAID, etc. Don't get me wrong, I think that's a great thing -- in fact, I posted some time back that I believe hardware RAID will take on more an more of the advanced features of drive pooling software, and we'll all benefit.

 

Perhaps. RALC should become a new 'standard' :)



It's just the boot disk and all my data is on a RAID 5 array behind an Adaptec controller so pretty safe. Still debating it in my head :) Couple hours of work to get it back to the way it was.

 

And presumably you have lots of robust backups, just in case  ;)

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fredaroony

Didnt blow the disk away but Windows didn't like it much and kept rebooting  :) I was able to switch back to AHCI and Windows did a quick repair then it was fine on the next reboot.

Edited by fredaroony

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gstarks

gstarks, thanks for the fantastic explanation.

 

If I read it correctly, it is possible to create a 'RAID 0' using non-uniform disks: i.e. drives of different sizes. In 'true' RAID 0, of course, that's not possible, or at least the array will only utilize the capacity of each drive that matches the size of the smallest drive.

 

And, if I read correctly, the HP RAID controller is starting to blur the line between RAID Controller and Drive Pooling Software, such as DrivePool, DriveBender, flexRAID, etc. Don't get me wrong, I think that's a great thing -- in fact, I posted some time back that I believe hardware RAID will take on more an more of the advanced features of drive pooling software, and we'll all benefit.

 

Perhaps. RALC should become a new 'standard' :)

 

So you misread a little... you would be creating 4 separate arrays, each of which can be based on different drive sizes and each of which contains independent logical disks of type RAID0.  There's no spreading of data across those drives, they are independently exposed to the OS, just like AHCI (where you could of course then apply drive pooling software).

 

Unlike AHCI however, you could in theory add additional disks to any of the arrays, assuming there were ports, drive bays, and they were at lease the same size as the first disk.  Of course on the MicroServer you don't have this luxury.

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ikon

OK, Got it. There is no striping across different sized drives. I guess my vision of drive pooling hardware cards will have to wait. I'll keep RALC on the back burner until there are such cards ;)

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