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drwhatley

Disaster Recovery (Natural Disasters)

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drwhatley

My team just implemented a disaster recovery plan for our University backing up our servers and various data to a location off site. We also have redundant fiber connections running completely different routes. If there was a fire or earthquake or any other sort of natural disaster we could recover campus in a matter of hours.

 

What are people doing for this type of situation for home server use? I don't have enough important data to create a full blown DR plan. I simply back up bare bones to a NAS and store it in a fire/water proof safe.

 

What are some thoughts on devices like the ioSafe N2 (http://iosafe.com/products-n2-overview)? Not only does it withstand elements, but ioSafe offers an after disaster service where you send them your NAS for data recovery. I would never send my data to someone else to be restored!

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ikon

Hi drwhatley. Welcome to HSS and the forums.

 

Here's some links to my disaster recovery plan. The links don't include the recovery part per se. It would consist of putting together a new server and restoring data from my off site backup.

 

SERVER SETUP PHOTOS

http://homeservershow.com/forums/index.php?/topic/1899-whs-2011-storage-strategy/page__st__140#entry47628

BACKUP STRATEGY
http://homeservershow.com/forums/index.php?/topic/4788-what-i-hope-to-acheive-with-your-help/page__p__51373#entry51373

BACKUP SCRIPTS
http://homeservershow.com/forums/index.php?/topic/5197-robocopy-backup-scripts/

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schoondoggy

I have a ioSafe N2. The ioSafe products have been thoroughly tested by people other than ioSafe and the have lived up to their claims.

In addition to the ioSafe I do back up to an offsite service.

You mentioned storing your NAS in a fireproof safe. Do you know what the maximum internal temperature of the safe is?

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ikon

Good point schoondoggy. My father worked at a place about 25 years ago that had a fire. They backed up their PCs to floppy disks and stored them in a 'fireproof' safe. When they opened the safe the day after the fire the floppies were there alright, but none of them were readable -- the heat had demagnetized the disks. I don't know if HDDs would survive better, but it would be a concern for me.

 

Also, it's not just how high the temperature gets; it's also how long the temperature is elevated.

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Dave

Their recovery service is a great value if you ever need it.  I would gladly send them a drive if I needed the data back.  I've had customers pay in the thousands to resurrect old photos that they foolishly never backed up. The N2 is also a great box but I am still an advocate of offsite data of some means.  A tornado could pitch your N2 into Oz and you might never get it back.  Yet, the house next door could be perfectly safe.  That's why I did the last podcast on buying some external drives and taking them to "grandmas" house or something like that.  That's just one part of my plan.  Local * 3, Cloud, externals at grandmas.

 

Most fire safes are not rated for media.  I would hate to pay for one that is!  Most of them are simply an oven and will cook your media like ikon stated.  I would trust ioSafe to my data before I would a safe.  If you already have a storage plan you could get one of their ioSafe Solo drives.

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schoondoggy

Hard drives tend to have a non-operating temperature  maximum between 150F and 200F. The average fire safe is designed to protect paper 451F.

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ikon

So the temp inside most 'fireproof' safes could get well above the safe temp for HDDs.

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schoondoggy

Yes, you need to check for internal temp and the amount of time they can maintain it.

Media safes are what they are usually called.

I think a small media safe inside a larger fire safe would be safe as well.

Edited by schoondoggy

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ikon

Hence why IOSafe uses water to buffer the contents.

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drwhatley

Very good point about the safe becoming an oven. Even the IOSafe has a time limit it is rated at before data is irrecoverable. Storing data off site seems to be the way to go for me. Are you guys just storing hard drives at "grandma's house," or are you backing up over a network?

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