Jump to content
RESET Forums (homeservershow.com)
Jesse

Losing network connection when HVAC cycles on....

Recommended Posts

KydDynoMyte

How old are your UPS batteries? For a while at work once every week or two the server would be off and the UPS would sometimes be beeping, sometimes not. Overtime I rotated 3 different UPS we have and same result. They were a couple years old but the batteries seemed to be fine, unplug the UPS and everything would stay running, and everything looked good in the UPS monitoring software. But I replaced the batteries anyway and it hasn't happened since.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
ikon

That's pretty odd KydDynoMyte. Were these name brand UPS'? Normally, the Gel-Cel batteries used in most smaller UPS' are good for about 5 years. A common practice is to have a schedule to have them changed out at around 4 years. I've seen some places where they do it every 3 years, but most of the ones I've dealt with are between 4 & 5.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
KydDynoMyte

I am a real bad judge of time once it gets over a couple days, they could of been closer to 5 years old. Just cheap cyber power ones. Oddly enough, I kind of ran into the same thing at home with some nicer (displays on the units) geek squad ones (also made by cyber power I think) I got at best buy on clearance a few years ago. I don't think they lasted 4 years but hard telling how long they sat around on the shelf. But they seemed ifne testing them bu unplugging the ups but when there was any power problem the devices plugged into them would shut off until I replaced the batteries. Maybe I should try a different brand, but they do seem to be working better with the new batteries.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
ikon

A lot of cheaper UPS' come with poorer quality batteries (to save costs). Replacing them with good, especially name brand batteries, can make a big difference.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Jesse

Hello,

 

This morning it occurred to me that the one thing that has remained constant (besides the problem itself) is the UPS I am using for the router.  Everything else has changed, including my ISP, yet the problem has remained constant throughout. 

 

Because I bought it only for use with the modem and router, I bought the smallest, cheapest APC UPS I could find.  I have verified that the router will run for quite a while on just the battery power from this UPS, but I am wondering if it is just not doing a good job during over/under voltage situations.  So today I pulled my APC SMC1000 off of my test server and am using it for the router.  We will see.

 

I had no idea CAT6 is more fussy than CAT5e, but at one point I had both the modem and routher in my wife's office, connected to each other with store bought network cable, with her Mac attached to the router with store bought cable.  This did not solve the problem. 

 

I guess the next step will be to shut down the entire network other than her Mac and plug her directly into the modem (with a store bought cable).  Man do I hope the replacement UPS solves this....

 

Thanks again for the help.  You guys have given me a lot to work with.

 

Jesse

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
pcdoc

Another option might to buy a premade cable and do a temporary replacement one at a time to see if you can isolate the issue to a particular run.  It probably is not the whole house but one or two of the runs if there is an issue. Without knowing where and how the cabling is run, it is hard to tell but you are going to have to start unplugging runs one at a time, and putting a temp patch cable unit you go through all your runs.  Once you are done with that, you will have to resort to an electrician to check your electrical system to see if there is and issue.  I know this came up already but are all your switches on a UPS?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
ikon

pcdoc reminded me of something. Check your cable runs for any kinks or tight loops or bends.

 

I have done tests using a $6,000 cable tester and you'd be amazed at how much tight bends and kinks can affect performance. What is also pretty funny, is to watch how the performance can be altered by retesting after unkinking the same cable. That doesn't always work of course, and I certainly do not recommend doing it (once kinked, some cables never come back), but my testing definitely convinced me to handle cable gently: don't kink it, don't bend it too much, and don't pull on it too hard.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
westom

The wife reports that the lights sometimes dim when the HVAC cycles. 

 

Cat6 is not more sensitive than Cat5.  A UPS would do nothing to avert the problem.  However if hardware on that UPS is designed defectively, then the UPS, when switched even a short time to battery backup mode, can cause problems.

 

  Dimming lights symptom could describe the problem.   However that symptom is obvious.  And in rare cases is also an indication of a major human safety threat.  In one venue, they ignored it.  Fortunately nobody was home when the house exploded.

 

  So start with basics that can explain your networking problems and dimming.  Examine an earth ground that must connect the breaker box to earth.  Often a bare copper, quarter inch wire from the breaker box to an earth ground rod.  It must exist.  The rod must be firmly in earth.  Wires must be firmly attached at both ends.  Only inspection can determine if it is even still connected.  Trace the entire length of that ground wire.

 

  Also connected just as short to that same earthing electrode must be the protector for telephone lines and a wire connected directly to coax cable for TV/internet.  If not, fix them.  They are important.  All must make a common connection to that ground electrode.

 

  Now, which lights dim?  Which circuits?  For example, connect an incandescent bulb to power for the modem / router and computer.  Do any dim when HVAC cycles?  Does an internet loss coincide with that dimming?

 

  Many would cure symptoms with a UPS. Instead, address the problem.  Start with those simple inspections that might explain your internet loss and are also essential to human safety.  Then we can move on to other 'usual suspects'.

Edited by westom

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
ikon

Hi westom; welcome to the forums.

 

If you're referring to my statement about CAT6, you misread it. I didn't say CAT6 is more "sensitive", I said it's "much more sensitive to incorrect installation". There's a huge difference between the two. Having installed between 6,000 and 8.000 network jacks, I can state from personal experience that CAT6 is definitely more difficult to install, especially the stuff with the cross-divider running down the middle. I believe that all network runs of CAT5e or higher that are terminated on site should be tested with a good quality certifier.

 

I agree about the AC ground. No one has mentioned that specifically, so I'm glad you did. He might also have one or more breakers that are acting up.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
pcdoc

Cat6 is not more sensitive than Cat5.  A UPS would do nothing to avert the problem.  However if hardware on that UPS is designed defectively, then the UPS, when switched even a short time to battery backup mode, can cause problems.

 

  Dimming lights symptom could describe the problem.   However that symptom is obvious.  And in rare cases is also an indication of a major human safety threat.  In one venue, they ignored it.  Fortunately nobody was home when the house exploded.

 

  So start with basics that can explain your networking problems and dimming.  Examine an earth ground that must connect the breaker box to earth.  Often a bare copper, quarter inch wire from the breaker box to an earth ground rod.  It must exist.  The rod must be firmly in earth.  Wires must be firmly attached at both ends.  Only inspection can determine if it is even still connected.  Trace the entire length of that ground wire.

 

  Also connected just as short to that same earthing electrode must be the protector for telephone lines and a wire connected directly to coax cable for TV/internet.  If not, fix them.  They are important.  All must make a common connection to that ground electrode.

 

  Now, which lights dim?  Which circuits?  For example, connect an incandescent bulb to power for the modem / router and computer.  Do any dim when HVAC cycles?  Does an internet loss coincide with that dimming?

 

  Many would cure symptoms with a UPS. Instead, address the problem.  Start with those simple inspections that might explain your internet loss and are also essential to human safety.  Then we can move on to other 'usual suspects'.

 

Welcome to the forums.  Very good points as two years ago I had a near tragedy with an electrical panel catching on fire due to a old style grounding block.  Where I was going with the UPS and patch cables was to isolate the issue.  At this point it is not known if the issue is induced into the network or is the network.  Unless he has some good test equipment or has a "professional" come in, he will have to do something to determine where the problems lies.  If it where me, I would be doing two things.  Have an electrician double check my wiring/panel and I would grab a bunch of premade patch cords and try an isolate my network by running some temporary connections.  Once I determined one or the other, than the problem got a bit easier.  There are obviously many ways one can approach this and this is just one way.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now



×
×
  • Create New...