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Why even buy a NAS?


Pancakes

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KydDynoMyte

Pancakes just wants to keep backups on it. Any NAS is probably overkill for just keeping backups on though.

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Yes, you lose the services offered by Synology directly, such as their own DDNS (it is linked to the serial number of the device, all XPenology install uses a nulled serial, though some people tend to

ecthomason

 I've been mulling this over myself recently because I need a backup machine. The Synology NAS was my first choice, but they are expensive, underpowered, propietary, and virtually non-upgradeable. They are however easy to setup and use, and my experience with RAIDs and server setup is newbie level. This is what scares me about building a WHS, that and the increased size/noise/heat levels. Then it's do I buy the hp prebuilt WHS or build my own. Either way it gets pretty expensive.

 

 Maybe the better solution is to just buy a usb hdd toaster and a few drives, backup to each one on a rotating schedule, and store them in different locations in storage cases like this. http://www.amazon.com/IO-Crest-3-5-Inch-Storage-SY-ACC35009/dp/B003OBZQSS/ref=pd_bxgy_pc_text_z 

 

 It may be more work, but it's cheap.

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jmwills

One plus side to a NAS, is at least Synology, is that it does have it own internal website.

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Whether a toaster is a good idea depends, I think, a lot on how many client PCs you have. If it's only one, I see no problem; a toaster should work well. If you have more, then I think a centralised solution, like WHS, makes more sense.

 

Building your own WHS is not really a big deal. You can eliminate a lot of potential issues by getting a pre-built box, such as an N54L MicroServer. It works well, and is pretty easy as long as you don't try to push the hardware too much. There are plenty of people on these forums who can help you get it going.

 

The most important thing to start, is to identify just what you want the box to do.

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schoondoggy

Back to the original question;
'Why do you guys even buy NAS's?'

Most people frequenting this site do not buy 2-4 drive NAS systems.

Most everyone here is running a server of some kind.

I recommend 2 and 4 drive Synology boxes to novice users that need to get some form of backup going in their homes.

I don't think this group is the target audience for 2-4 drive NAS.

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jmwills

I agree Kevin, but even buying one and testing it reaffirms that premise.  At least you will learn the platform and will be able to recommend it to someone who might benefit from it.

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I basically agree about 2-drive systems. With 4 drives, I would look at WHS. My own server has a 4-drive RAID5 and an OS drive. That's it. Of course, I have other drives for backing up the server, but the server itself is not some dtive-laden behemoth. The quality and convenience of WHS backup is my main reason for running it.

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schoondoggy

Great point John, that is one of the reasons I have a Synology based box in my home. I can keep up on their technology and feel comfortable recommending them.

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