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schoondoggy

Ethernet patch cords 1'-200' CAT5 or 6 or 7

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ikon

Those are great prices. I just build my own, because I have the materials and skills and, most importantly, a proper tester, so I know for sure the cables are good. Heck, I test ready-made cables too, just to be sure. I've actually had a few fail right out of the package.

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jmwills

I did see on that site, a 1000' roll of either CAT 5 or 6 for $40.  That's a ridiculous price.

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ikon

If it really passes muster, it truly is incredibly cheap. If I needed any ATM, I would seriously consider it, but I still a box and a half of CAT6 on hand.

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Dave

$18 Shipping for the 1000'

 

Even so, Monoprice.com is around $80 with $18 shipping.

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ikon

Anything below $100 for 1,000 ft of CAT5/6 is incredible.

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schoondoggy

After we did the home networking shows over on The Average Guy, I picked up one of these;

http://www.amazon.com/Paladin-Tools-DataShark-Network-Tester/dp/B002RL8TU8

Per Bill Paulmenn's recomendation. 

It is easy to use. I agree with Ikon, whether you are building your own or buying patch cables it is a good idea to test them before you use them.

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ImTheTypeOfGuy

Nice prices all around.

 

Is cat 7 a typo. I haven't heard of it.

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schoondoggy

CAT7 was intended to be the standard for 10Gb Ethernet over RJ45 copper;

cut from http://www.serverracksandcable.com/cat5-cat5e-cat6-cat7-questions-answers.php

1. How do cat5, cat5e, cat6 and cat7 differ from one another?

Simply put, cat5 rates at 100MHz, cat5e rates at 100MHz, cat6 rates at 250MHz, cat6A rates at 500 MHz, and cat7 allegedly rates at 600MHz.

Nowadays, cat7 is not approved by the TIA, but is recognized by BICSI, NEMA, and the IEEE. Presently cat5e or cat6 are the most commonly used options in today’s telecommunication systems. Cat6 cables are being created with separators that will deal with improved crosstalk and better 23 gauge conductor wires compared to the smaller Cat5e 24 gauge ones.

Cat5e comes with 100 ohm impedance, as well as electrical characteristics that support transmissions all the way up to 100 MHz. When it comes to performance, cat5 and cat5e differ in every aspect, such as attenuation, capacity, resistance, and frequency. The components of cat5e were especially made for high speed Ethernet. Although the components of cat5e work with gigabit Ethernet, they will perform below top standard if the distances are too long. So, if you use 1000 Mbps switches,cat6 cables would be better compared to cat5e cables.

The ‘e’ in cat5e actually stands for ‘enhanced’ and is totally backward compatible with modern equipment using cat5. Its improved electrical performance makes sure that the cables can support any applications which would need more bandwidth, like video or gigabit Ethernet.

 

 

 

Most vendors that are offering 10Gb on a RJ45 connection are calling out CAT6a. 

Note in the specs on this Intel card CAT6 is good to 55M and CAT6a to 100M which is the standard for Ethernet.

http://ark.intel.com/products/58953/Intel-Ethernet-Converged-Network-Adapter-X540-T1

Edited by schoondoggy

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ImTheTypeOfGuy

Cool, thanks for posting.

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