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Mr_Smartepants

Can you build your own Gen8 equivalent Microserver?

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gstarks

129 a year?

No, the iLO licenses are permanent, so starting at $129 one-time.  The 1yr/3yr in the SKU description is for technical support of the features added by the license.   Support for the core iLO features is included in the underlying ProLiant warranty.

The details are here: http://h18013.www1.hp.com/products/servers/management/ilo-essentials-software/index.html

 

Search around.. here it is for $106: http://www.provantage.com/hewlett-packard-hp-bd775aae~7DECC27A.htm

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schoondoggy

Do you think the management suite is all that valuable to most home/SOHO users? I wonder how many really need remote access to a server that's literally a few feet away.

I don't think they are looking for remote access, iLo gives you monitoring and the ability to event notify.

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PaulKlumpp

This topic here and some issues with the Gen8 got me thinking.

 

Mainly the issue with Linux not being supported correctly pissed me off. When the hard disks are set to AHCI mode, the server's fans will run at 30%, which is very noisy instead of nice and silent. Also, the HP support said about this issue: "Works as designed.". That being said, I think the Microserver is rather "broken by design", in some ways. Why would anyone run a _single_ hard disk in Raid 0 mode just for the driver and bios software to be compatible for less noise?

I thought the MicroServer is supposed to be a server. But they expect you to rather install Windows Server or VmWare ESXi instead of a generic Linux. What?!

 

So here's my List:

1 x Intel Core i3-4130T, 2x 2.90GHz, boxed (BX80646I34130T)
1 x G.Skill RipJaws DIMM Kit  8GB, DDR3-1600, CL9-9-9-24 (F3-12800CL9D-8GBRL)
1 x ASRock Z87E-ITX (90-MXGPG0-A0UAYZ)
1 x Lian Li PC-Q25B schwarz, Mini-DTX/Mini-ITX
1 x be quiet! Pure Power L8-CM 430W ATX 2.31 (L8-CM-430W/BN180)

 

Parts, which will give you good server performance, low power consumption, NAS and even HTPC features.

This machine will sum up to around 420,- Euro. The MicroServer G8 G1620T cost me about 405,- Euro. Are the IT-Management features and perhaps ECC worth the performance and fan noise drawbacks?

 

No. I sent the MicroServer back and will go for a DIY setup instead.

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ikon

Welcome to the forums. Congrats on getting your list together. Looks like it should be a nice system, albeit a little larger than a MicroServer. Keep us updated on your progress please.

 

re: Linux. I think HP is aiming the MicroServer at the SOHO/Very Small Business market. These places typically do not have IT staff, and many do not want or cannot afford to pay for consultants, so they tend to use Windows Server because it's easier for them to manage. I think HP created the ESXi image for the same reason -- to make it as easy as possible for the SOHO/VSB market to use.

 

Linux is great, but it is more difficult for neophytes to learn and/or manage.

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schoondoggy

This topic here and some issues with the Gen8 got me thinking.

 

Mainly the issue with Linux not being supported correctly pissed me off. When the hard disks are set to AHCI mode, the server's fans will run at 30%, which is very noisy instead of nice and silent. Also, the HP support said about this issue: "Works as designed.". That being said, I think the Microserver is rather "broken by design", in some ways. Why would anyone run a _single_ hard disk in Raid 0 mode just for the driver and bios software to be compatible for less noise?

I thought the MicroServer is supposed to be a server. But they expect you to rather install Windows Server or VmWare ESXi instead of a generic Linux. What?!

 

So here's my List:

1 x Intel Core i3-4130T, 2x 2.90GHz, boxed (BX80646I34130T)

1 x G.Skill RipJaws DIMM Kit  8GB, DDR3-1600, CL9-9-9-24 (F3-12800CL9D-8GBRL)

1 x ASRock Z87E-ITX (90-MXGPG0-A0UAYZ)

1 x Lian Li PC-Q25B schwarz, Mini-DTX/Mini-ITX

1 x be quiet! Pure Power L8-CM 430W ATX 2.31 (L8-CM-430W/BN180)

 

Parts, which will give you good server performance, low power consumption, NAS and even HTPC features.

This machine will sum up to around 420,- Euro. The MicroServer G8 G1620T cost me about 405,- Euro. Are the IT-Management features and perhaps ECC worth the performance and fan noise drawbacks?

 

No. I sent the MicroServer back and will go for a DIY setup instead.

Welcome to the forums.

BYOB is the best way to get exactly what you want.

If you would like to make suggestions on the microserver, we have a thread that they follow;

http://homeservershow.com/forums/index.php?/topic/6075-recommendations-to-hp-to-make-the-microserver-gen8-even-better/

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ikon

Thanks for reminding me about that thread schoondoggy.

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LoneWolf

There are several keys to doing a near-identical build.  The biggest one is getting lights-out management, which a lot of boards don't have.  Only several options there.  Supermicro has some boards in the mATX and miniITX form factor that do this, but the only board (not my favorite vendor, but livable) that matches up the way I'd want is the Asrock E3C226D2I mini-ITX server board (the Z87 chipset board aboveis not a server board, nor is the Z87 chipset a server chipset; it is a desktop one, Intel's server chipsets are the C2xx series).

 

http://www.asrock.com/server/overview.asp?Model=E3C226D2I

 

Admittedly, Haswell Socket 1150, but server boards are going that way now.  It also has the C226 chipset instead of the C204 of the Microserver, meaning all SATA ports are SATA3.

 

Pair it with the BitFenix Prodigy:

http://www.bitfenix.com/global/en/products/chassis/prodigy/

 

From there, it's a matter of customizing CPU, RAM, hard disks, fans, etc.  Note:  There won't be a whole lot of micro cases with a backplane like the Microserver Gen8, so you'll probably be stuck there.

 

Pros:

-Getting to choose your processor, right off the bat

-Getting to choose a power supply the way you want (e.g., a 350w Platinum for top efficiency)

-More flexible optical drive options, if that's important to you

-(in the case of the Asrock mainboard and some others) C226 mainboard has full SATA3 support and Intel USB 3.0

-Getting to use Haswell-core Intel processors (Xeon E3 v3 family) and possibly higher TDP ones

 

Cons (for the DIY solution):

-Lack of backplane/drive bay options unless you spend a fair amount or DIY

-Driver support not as consistent

-iLO4 has much better support and updates behind it than the AspeedTech lights-out (which, btw, is what HP used for the RAC for the Microserver N36L/N40L/N54L, albeit with their customization) and is likely more powerful

-iLO4 integrates with specific HP RAID controllers for an even better managed solution

-HP has a nice optional gig managed switch, which stacks with the Microserver and can be sensed by the iLO for additional monitoring

 

Both have their points.  Personally, I like the Microserver Gen8 for a lot of stuff --the iLO support is what really nails it in the end in the way other solutions don't.  However, I can see where others might want more SATA3 ports (I don't need them due to my use of a RAID card that supports it already).

Edited by LoneWolf

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adsboel

HP is quality you dont get with custom builts .. and ILO !

 

I was on the verge of buying bitfoenix and stacking it up with HW, but the Price just didnt justify what i was getting. It looked good, but nowhere near the allround quality of a HP.

 

I am so happy i went with Gen8. The alternative is not really a homebuilt, its a ML310e Gen8...

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ikon

While I agree that it can be hard to beat the price of a MicroServer by building your own. I can't completely go along with the idea that home brews are lower quality. Many forum members are very capable and can build systems that equal, or even better, those produced by HP, or any vendor.

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LoneWolf

Most of it, I agree we could ikon.  I'm a picky system builder, and that goes back a long ways (my first custom build being a 386DX-20MHz in `93). 

 

It's hard to get the perfect case though in mITX or even mATX.  The Bitfenix Prodigy is good, but doesn't have a backplane for docking drives.  A brief search of mITX server cases showed ones with backplanes, but thee ones I found aren't built nearly as good as the Prodigy, and don't have as many bays (or are lacking an ODD bay).

 

The other major intangibles aren't in the build --they're in HP Intelligent Provisioning, integration with an HP RAID controller and (if desired) network switch, onboard monitoring through the iLO that you just can't get through anything other than an iLO or Dell iDRAC.  Certified driver support for all major operating systems, regularly updated and well suppported.  Same for BIOS/firmware support.

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