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joem

CyberPower CP1000AVRLCD UPS Battery Backup $100

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ikon

It is a good price. People should just know that this model is NOT one of the pure sine wave units, at least AFAIK.

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tinkererguy

So glad you brought that up, cskenney!

 

I went through this, when choosing a power supply and UPS back in August 2011:

http://www.tinkertry.com/efficientpowersupplyandups/

 

became a CyberPower PFCLCD fan, and wrote up the first affordable way to shutdown ESXi home labs using their free VMware appliance:

http://www.tinkertry.com/configure-automated-shutdown-homelab-datacenter-15-minutes/

 

and just heard Jim Collison talking about PFC/UPSs again, near the end of his latest podcast:

http://theaverageguy.tv/2013/05/12/hangoutasaurus-with-mike-howard-from-jpeg2raw-com-and-drobo-meetup-interviews-in-omaha-ht116/

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pcdoc

$100

Since you guys have been discussing UPS's this looks like a good deal. 

http://www.tigerdirect.com/applications/SearchTools/item-details.asp?EdpNo=3260287&CatId=234

 

I would not use this on most current day system as cskenny pointed out it is not a PFC compatible unit.  I agree with Paul on the Cyberpower PFCLCD as I have several of these.  Great units for the money.  I also have some APC units but they are getting more expensive and harder to find for a decent price.  I believe I have a total of 7 UPS and 5 of them are the Cyberpower.

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Guest no-control

Going to be the lone wolf skeptic here....again (where is timekills?). Where is the evidence that running without a sine wave UPS will damage an active PFC PSU? I've run Sim Sine UPS' for years without a problem. Not just my home gear either. I've seen plenty of enterprise gear run with sim-sine UPSs this way as well.

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ikon

Issues with non-sine-wave units are only going to show up when the UPS' are running on battery. The rest of the time there isn't any difference.

 

I can't speak to enterprise gear because all such gear I've used has been backed up by an industrial-class UPS, such as a 50KVA Liebert. AFAIK, all such units are sine-wave by nature.

 

There is an interesting test that can be done: plug 2 or more non-sine-wave UPS units into each other, daisy-chain fashion. If the unit plugged into the wall is unplugged, interesting things will happen.

 

One might think that all the units except the one that was plugged into the wall would continue to think they're connected to the power grid. Then when battery power on the unplugged unit ran out, the 2nd unit from the wall would switch over to batter power and cause the rest of the units to continue to believe they have AC power.

 

Unfortunately, this is not what happens. I've tried this with a few brands of non-sine-wave UPS. I did this more than 5 years ago so my memory is not 100%. What I do recall is that it didn't work. With at least 2 of the brands, unplugging the unit closest to the wall socket caused the computer to shutdown immediately. It didn't even stay up for the life of 1 battery, as one might expect: it shut down instantly.

 

I haven't had enough free sine-wave units available to try it with them. However, this thread did give me an idea: I could try plugging a computer into a non-sine-wave UPS and plug that UPS into a sine-wave UPS, then power up the computer. Then, unplug the sine-wave UPS and see if the non-sine-wave UPS keeps going. In theory, it should.

 

Just had a thought: maybe we should call the 2 types of UPS Sine-Wave and Sine-Wave-LESS :D

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ikon

OK, had 5 min. free so I just did the test. I plugged a printer into an APC Back-UPS 350, then plugged the APC into a CyberPower CP1000PFCLCD, then plugged the CyberPower into the wall.

 

After everything was powered up and running normally, I unplugged the CyberPower. It worked as I expected: the Back-UPS blinked from green to orange for a fraction of a second and then back to green -- it thought it was still connected to normal AC power which, really, it was. I didn't let the CyberPower drain all the way down, but I could see the battery life indicator dropping. I have no doubt that, after the CyberPower battery drained, the APC would then go onto battery.

 

One thing I find interesting about this is that it now seems possible to actually daisy-chain sine-wave UPS units to get longer uptime, without having to spend thousands for a higher end unit. It might seem unorthodox, but it should actually work. :)

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Guest no-control

I have a daisy chained UPS system set up at home. No problems with it so far. I've done several tests with it and it performs as designed and within the limits of the equipment. Including a full drain test with everything "live" so I could see the shutdown processes. 

 

 

Power is distributed via a 12 outlet Cyberpower PDU. This is backed by 2 uninterruptable power supplies (UPS) A Tripp-Lite G1010USB 1000VA/500W from the wall powers both my primary system and provides fault tolerance for the rack’s CyberPower 500VA/300w UPS.

 

Full Setup is here for anyone who is curious about it.

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