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crashplan?..ok to use while not officially supported on whs2011?


capall
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If it can run on Server 2008R2, there is about a 99% chance it will run on WHS 2011.  What did you have in mind?

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Technical method? Try it on a test server; see if it installs, if it runs, if it conflicts with anything else on the server. Is there a 100% fool-proof way? No.

 

No one, not even MS, can tell you a program is 100% compatible. The other, non-technical, thing to do is search for evidence/testimony from the experiences of others.

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so you're thinking is that if it installs correctly, and even if its not officially supported, then one should have full confidence that the program will operate as it should / intended. In this case, copying / syncing data. The key being, does it install correctly?

 

 

What I was getting at earlier, was, can you eval a program based on what code it was written in, and then be able to relate that to it being able to run or not, on whs2011 or other OS's.

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Being able to install is only 1 of several criteria I mentioned. Yes, the program has to install, but it also has to run, and do so without conflicting with other software on the system. Installation by itself is no guarantee of anything, except that it installed.

 

As I posted earlier, there is no 100% fool-proof way to be certain a program is compatible. Certification by a manufacturer such as Microsoft helps of course, but even it is not 100%. Basically, Microsoft runs programs through a suite of tests. If no incompatibilities are discovered, the program is considered compatible and gets certified. However, the suite can only test the things it was designed to test; it can't test everything. Computer software is extremely complex. It is, for all practical purposes, impossible to be 100% certain.

 

You cannot base OS compatibility on what code or language a program was written in.

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interesting, I'm surprised that its somewhat so ambiguous, running an "unsupported" generic program (ie. not a backup program) is one thing, but when you're relying on a backup program to backup your data, its a bit more critical, and checking for conflicts etc, leaves quite a bit of uncertainty. After all, we want to be 100% sure our data is 100% backed up.

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so guys, educate me here. Whats the technical method of evaluating if a software can run on whs2011.

 

Thanks

 

 The compatibility concerns come from the old days of V1 running DE. As DE was a software solution, corruption/compatibility was a concern as it affected disk I/O. Step to version 2011 and DE is gone hence most if not all of corruption concerns are gone with it. You can argue that you can always find ways of messing things up but at the end of the day, 2011 is now no different than a Windows 7/8 machine when it comes to software and whether or not it is compatible.  Just as I do on my main machines whether server or workstation, use some discretion when installing software and limit it to what you need.  Other than that there should be no concerns as long as that software did not impact the stability of the machine (again either workstation or server).

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Well, there is no such thing as 100% when it comes to data. But, we can come pretty close. There are a number of things that can be done to help get as close as possible:

  1. use a backup program that has a good reputation. This is a big one. Many thousands of users reporting on their experience with a program gives a pretty good indication of its efficacy, reliability, performance, etc.;
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  2. use the backup program's logging features to get reports of what it backed up, and if it shows any errors;
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  3. use, especially when first using a backup program, a file verification utility of some kind. This will give you a good idea if the files were copied correctly. Note: this really only applies to backup programs that copy files in their native format, not in some proprietary backup format. I believe CrashPlan does this, does it not?
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  4. If a program does use a proprietary format (e.g. Acronis) then make sure to use its own built-in backup verification facilities..
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  5. Be sure to do periodic restores from backups, especially for programs that use a proprietary format. A backup that hasn't been verified isn't a backup at all. A backup system that doesn't include periodic restorations isn't a good system.
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  6. Finally, and most importantly, have lots of copies. At a minimum, have 3 copies of all data, on 2 different types of media, and keep at least 1 copy off site. I keep 5 copies of most of my data. Once you have confidence that your backup program is reliable, then your greatest insurance policy is the number of copies.
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  • 2 years later...

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