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Server 2012 slow boot with USB3 and/or Hyper-V


timekills
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This is a spill-over from a discussion regarding ReFS on a drive hosting VHDs in Server 2012 Hyper-V.

 

 

I've run into a snag slowing my trials down. Presumably unrelated, but after enabling Hyper-V role and then upon rebooting Server 2012 it hangs at the blue Windows icon screen. As in, hangs for 12+ hours, even after multiple forced reboots. I've seen some questions on Google about slow boots after enabling Hyper-V but this is hung,

 

Joe_Miner mentioned he and some others had the same issue and we all are using Gigabyte Z68 boards. I found that loading the latest Intel Management Engine Interface (MEI) *and* disabling USB3 (through the BIOS) definitely got it past the hang, and even back into "normal" boot times. 

 

 

 

I've loaded the latest MEI but haven't disabled the USB 3.0 so that may be my issue.  Were you able to re-enable you USB 3.0 afterwards?  I've been using the USB 3.0 connection for our C910 for Hangouts with our grandson -- If I screw that up I'm in deep trouble  :)

 

I have a 2720 on order so I can do some of my own experimenting with it -- conceptually I'm liking the extra safety factor of RAID 6 over 5 though 10 looks really nice if you have the drives.

 

 

I haven't tried re-enabling USB 3, but I will in the next couple days. Just finishing setting up the VMs (Server 2012 Essentials and a  couple Win 7 VMs)

 

 


I wonder what the results would be if the onboard USB3 was disabled and a WD USB3 PCIe card was used instead.

 

 

Everything I've read points to it being the inbuilt Server 2012 USB 3 implementation, and not the USB3 manufacturer.

 

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I'd certainly like to see. I don't have an Intel based card to try it with. However, the driver is built-in to Windows 8/Server 2012 now. Certainly the way the hardware implements the driver's instructions could differ by hardware manufacturer, but the driver shouldn't change. I didn't actually try the Gigabyte provided USB3 drivers, as I generally prefer to stay with approved Windows or Intel drivers since I'm more concerned with stability over performance at the root server level.

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It could still make a difference since most of the drivers in Windows are provided by the manufacturer of the device. So, if the onboard USB3 uses a different chipset than the, for example, Renesas-based boards, it could well function differently. Can't be sure of course, but seems worth a try.

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With Windows Server 2012 and Windows 8, Microsoft has gotten even stricter with driver signature enforcement. If Gigabyte is providing USB3 drivers for the model of board you're using, and they're certified for at least Windows 8, chances are good they'll work flawlessly for Windows 8.

 

While Microsoft's own drivers are generally reliable, they're also generic so they may enable most of the features of a device or just basic functionality. Vendor drivers are preferable, especially if they have gone through WHQL certification.

 

As an example, when I rebuilt my HP EX487, Microsoft applies a basic SATA driver for the Intel RST controller in the server. This driver is fine for most functions, but since I run the server with an SSD, a notable issue is that the basic driver does NOT enable the TRIM function, even though the server itself does, as does Windows Server 2012. Once I installed the Intel RST driver and rebooted, the TRIM function of the SSD was enabled and life is good.

 

That said, I would definitely give the Gigabyte USB 3.0 driver a whirl so long as it's Windows 8 and/or 2012 certified. If it's Windows 7 certified it will *probably* work just fine, but you may want to approach that with a higher degree of caution.

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  • 1 month later...

Once you work out the reason as to why it was hanging enable verbose logging then do a restart, that way you'll be able to see exactly what it was doing that caused it to violently hang like that. Hyper-v in 2012 has had lots of teething issues as far as I know. I'm a little scared by it and still using 2008r2 for the time being for important servers.

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  • 3 weeks later...

I'm curious to know if this "may" have something to do with the drive format.. maybe 512e emulation after enabling hyper-v or perhaps the drives are 4k native? (both sector and logical)...

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