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diehard

New HP ProLiant MicroServer N54L Models On the Way

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ImTheTypeOfGuy

The list price looks to be about $40 more over a N40L machine.~

 

If you check Passmark the N40L is a 970 and the Passmark for the N54L is about 23% higher at 1189. Compared to the N36L with a Passmark of 805 it's a 48% jump.

 

Or another way to say it is the processor is "crap". I am amazed you guys are buying this stuff.

 

PS I have a pentium 4 560 at 3.6 GHz and 2GB of memory I will sell you.

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jmwills

My N40L has done everything I have thrown at it, but it's main purpose in life was destined to be a backup server for the WHS.

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Joe_Miner

Or another way to say it is the processor is "crap". I am amazed you guys are buying this stuff.

 

PS I have a pentium 4 560 at 3.6 GHz and 2GB of memory I will sell you.

 

The MicroServer is proving to be a very versatile and reliable machine at a very reasonable cost. Insight was pricing N40L’s as low as $112 and Newegg has been as low as $199 but typically you should be able to get one on sale for around $250 at Newegg (the two that I got were both under $250 each and one included a free copy of WHS-2011) -- right now Newegg has it at $289 after MIR. The N54L is a nice incremental improvement and with the heavy discounting we’ve seen on the N40L’s (and the N36L’s before that) I expect (speculation alert!) that the minimal difference in list price will disappear once we again see significant discounting at the street.

 

Fundamentally, it is a reliable excellent entry level small business server but It’s versatility with an enthusiast is nearly boundless when you look at what people can do by expanding the RAM to 8 or even 16GB and by adding the BIOS MODS with it’s many benefits (including eSATA port multiplication). I’ve seen write-ups of MicroServers configured as low-cost desktops, HTPC’s, Home Security servers, and home built routers. It’s a Home Hyper-V Lab, an ESXi Lab, and with virtualization enabled I’ve been able to run just about everything I can get my hands on either bare metal on the MicroServer or in a VM on the MicroServer. This is an excellent learning tool as it can be quickly reconfigured as well as a very capable home/business server. Many, including myself, have been running their home server solutions (WHS-V1, WHS-2011, or S2012E) on the N40L quite successfully.

 

I have no need for your Dell Pentium. I recently refurbished an eMachine with an old CPU and 2GB RAM for my sister and have it running an upgraded Windows 8 Pro with Media Center with Windows Office 2007 Home & Student Installed.

Edited by Joe_Miner

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ikon

Or another way to say it is the processor is "crap". I am amazed you guys are buying this stuff.

 

Well, it does seem the N40Ls are reliable and are working very well as WHS boxes. I haven't seen anyone who owns one complaining about it or wanting to get rid it.

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LoneWolf

Or another way to say it is the processor is "crap". I am amazed you guys are buying this stuff.

 

PS I have a pentium 4 560 at 3.6 GHz and 2GB of memory I will sell you.

Considering that the N40L processor kicks the tar out of a Pentium 4 560... :P

 

The idea behind the CPU isn't raw performance. It's reasonable performance for needs with low power consumption in a small box. If we wanted more, we'd go up and buy a ProLiant ML110. Which I didn't because it would have cost me significantly more, and taken more space.

 

I don't think anyone here was expecting to run a large SQL server, or host six VMs simultaneously, or search for the largest prime number with their Microserver. For what they want, they know what they're getting, and it does that. It's just clear that you don't understand the idea of others choosing hardware that meets their needs.

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ImTheTypeOfGuy

The MicroServer is proving to be a very versatile and reliable machine at a very reasonable cost. Insight was pricing N40L’s as low as $112 and Newegg has been as low as $199 but typically you should be able to get one on sale for around $250 at Newegg (the two that I got were both under $250 each and one included a free copy of WHS-2011) -- right now Newegg has it at $289 after MIR. The N54L is a nice incremental improvement and with the heavy discounting we’ve seen on the N40L’s (and the N36L’s before that) I expect (speculation alert!) that the minimal difference in list price will disappear once we again see significant discounting at the street.

 

Fundamentally, it is a reliable excellent entry level small business server but It’s versatility with an enthusiast is nearly boundless when you look at what people can do by expanding the RAM to 8 or even 16GB and by adding the BIOS MODS with it’s many benefits (including eSATA port multiplication). I’ve seen write-ups of MicroServers configured as low-cost desktops, HTPC’s, Home Security servers, and home built routers. It’s a Home Hyper-V Lab, an ESXi Lab, and with virtualization enabled I’ve been able to run just about everything I can get my hands on either bare metal on the MicroServer or in a VM on the MicroServer. This is an excellent learning tool as it can be quickly reconfigured as well as a very capable home/business server. Many, including myself, have been running their home server solutions (WHS-V1, WHS-2011, or S2012E) on the N40L quite successfully.

 

I have no need for your Dell Pentium. I recently refurbished an eMachine with an old CPU and 2GB RAM for my sister and have it running an upgraded Windows 8 Pro with Media Center with Windows Office 2007 Home & Student Installed.

 

Okay, if I could have gotten it for $112 I would have bought a couple of them and been right there with you.

 

Well, it does seem the N40Ls are reliable and are working very well as WHS boxes. I haven't seen anyone who owns one complaining about it or wanting to get rid it.

 

Good point.

 

Considering that the N40L processor kicks the tar out of a Pentium 4 560... :P

 

The idea behind the CPU isn't raw performance. It's reasonable performance for needs with low power consumption in a small box. If we wanted more, we'd go up and buy a ProLiant ML110. Which I didn't because it would have cost me significantly more, and taken more space.

 

I don't think anyone here was expecting to run a large SQL server, or host six VMs simultaneously, or search for the largest prime number with their Microserver. For what they want, they know what they're getting, and it does that. It's just clear that you don't understand the idea of others choosing hardware that meets their needs.

 

I guess my overbuilding everything just keeps me from being able to see the value in these machines. I know if I bought one I would be disappointed from day one. As you say I just don't understand since my style is more like Tim "the tool man" Taylor. :)

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ikon

my style is more like Tim "the tool man" Taylor. :)

 

OK, that does it; your next server just has to be named Binford 9000 :D

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LoneWolf

Okay, if I could have gotten it for $112 I would have bought a couple of them and been right there with you.

 

 

 

Good point.

 

 

 

I guess my overbuilding everything just keeps me from being able to see the value in these machines. I know if I bought one I would be disappointed from day one. As you say I just don't understand since my style is more like Tim "the tool man" Taylor. :)

Hey, my desktop and laptop are both built to the gills, so I do understand. :)

 

I just don't need that kind of power from my server. I need enough CPU that the box won't get overwhelmed during everyday tasks, and I need good I/O. Adding the HP SmartArray P410 hardware RAID controller to my Microserver took care of the I/O, so I'm good there. Also, I like my server quiet, and the Microserver is great for that as well.

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ImTheTypeOfGuy

Hey, my desktop and laptop are both built to the gills, so I do understand. :)

 

I just don't need that kind of power from my server. I need enough CPU that the box won't get overwhelmed during everyday tasks, and I need good I/O. Adding the HP SmartArray P410 hardware RAID controller to my Microserver took care of the I/O, so I'm good there. Also, I like my server quiet, and the Microserver is great for that as well.

 

I wish I was more like that because I would be able to save a lot of money that way. Maybe I am just jealous.

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