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What is wrong with my RocketRaid 2720 Raid5 array?


bondisdead
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I have a Highpoint RocketRAID 2720 in my WHS 2011. It contains eight 2TB drives, all in a single RAID-5 array. I schedule a weekly check on the array, and for the last 2-weeks, it has failed Data Consistency check. It errors out almost right away, and then starts to do a rebuild which takes a few days. The check ran again on Sunday, and same result. It is still rebuilding. I am guessing that a drive is going bad. If not, then what should I be looking for?

 

If I look at the Storage Health Inspector (SHI) in the WebGUI, I notice that two of my Seagate 2TB drives have bad sectors found + repaired. One has 192 and the other has 87. Both drives report as OK. If I check the SMART status, the drive with 192 bad sectors, it has failed unkown attribute B8 hex.

 

If this is indeed the bad drive, I'd like to remove it and replace it with another drive. What is the safest way to do this? Do I just pull it, and install the new drive? I don't see anything in the WebGUI that will allow me to remove the drive safely.

 

FYI, this is the infamous "server caught on fire" array from several months back! The array itself works just fine, and I can access my data w/out any issues. I just want to fix this, before things go south.

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After the array has finished rebuilding, shut down the system, remove the suspect drive, replace it with new drive, and power on again. Full disclosure: I don't own a RR card but, if it's like others, it will detect that the drive is missing and either start a rebuild automatically with the new drive or prompt you that the array is degraded and you should take steps to fix it, which usually consists of adding the new drive to the array.

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Thanks for the information. This was indeed my plan, unless I heard of a better way.

 

So do you think my theory of the hard-drive being bad as the cause of the RAID array data consistency check failures?

 

Kind of on-topic, do bad sectors on a hard-drive qualify for a warranty replacement?

Edited by bondisdead
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Bad sectors can cause problems for RAID controllers. You could have a drive going bad. However, bad sectors doesn't necessarily mean a drive is bad. I have run SpinRite on many drives that were exhibiting bad sectors and been able to put them back into service for years of use afterward. I run SpinRite against my drives once or twice a year.

 

In my experience, bad sectors do not qualify a drive for warranty replacement. Manufacturers build spare sectors into their drives and have firmware that replaces bad sectors with those spare ones. So, replacement of bad sectors is considered a normal function of a drive.

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Here is my two cents. First off, unless you have auto rebuild enabled, it will not do it automatically. You will have to go to the Maintenance screen and add the drive back in. Page 42-43 of the manual explains the process which is the process I used when I had a bad drive. As for the probable cause, make sure it is the same drive always failing. If the problem moves around you may have other issues but if "drive 2 Controller 1" for example is the one deteriorating I would replace it quickly. This just happened to me about 2 months ago and I was back in business in no time.

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Thanks pcdoc; what you say about RR cards pretty much jives with my experience with other RAID controllers. I think all RAID cards have very similar ways of doing things.

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Maybe a bit offtopic, but do the rocket raids have some functionality which Intel describes as Patrol Read ?

This can make sure that you do not only spot bad sectors when trying to read data from them. even with a Raid 5 it cold happen that you had bad sectors on 2 drives, but never did access date stored in those sectors...and once you need the data , you got data loss. In my opinion the patrol read is a must have for large Raid 5 arrays...

 

 

Quote:

Patrol Read" is a user definable option available in the Intel® RAID Web Console 2 that performs drive reads in the background and maps out any bad areas of the drive.

 

Patrol read checks for physical disk errors that could lead to drive failure. These checks usually include an attempt at corrective action. Patrol read can be enabled or disabled with automatic or manual activation.

 

A Patrol Read periodically verifies all sectors of physical disks that are connected to a controller, including the system reserved area in the RAID configured drives. Patrol Read works for all RAID levels and for all hotspare drives.

 

This process starts only when the RAID controller is idle for a defined period of time and no other background tasks are active, though it can continue to run during heavy I/O processes.

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Ther

Maybe a bit offtopic, but do the rocket raids have some functionality which Intel describes as Patrol Read ?

This can make sure that you do not only spot bad sectors when trying to read data from them. even with a Raid 5 it cold happen that you had bad sectors on 2 drives, but never did access date stored in those sectors...and once you need the data , you got data loss. In my opinion the patrol read is a must have for large Raid 5 arrays...

 

 

Quote:

Patrol Read" is a user definable option available in the Intel® RAID Web Console 2 that performs drive reads in the background and maps out any bad areas of the drive.

 

Patrol read checks for physical disk errors that could lead to drive failure. These checks usually include an attempt at corrective action. Patrol read can be enabled or disabled with automatic or manual activation.

 

A Patrol Read periodically verifies all sectors of physical disks that are connected to a controller, including the system reserved area in the RAID configured drives. Patrol Read works for all RAID levels and for all hotspare drives.

 

This process starts only when the RAID controller is idle for a defined period of time and no other background tasks are active, though it can continue to run during heavy I/O processes.

 

Not sure but I can tell it will flag an issue during writes as well as if something happens during idle however I am not sure what tech they are using.

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