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foy1der

Hardwire Everything, Right?

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foy1der

The patch panel is the basic CAT6 model from monoprice, cheap but it gets the job done.

 

Yea that cable on the right is running to the xbox in the basement, I don't think that I used it since I installed it. I believe it is a 20' cable on a 21' run.

 

You mentioned a LAN tester, how is that different from a cable tester? The one that I have is this one: http://www.amazon.co...ils_o04_s01_i02

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ikon

That cable tester is the type I was mentioning. All it does is check the polarity and continuity of the wires. That's not a bad thing to do, but it's far from enough IMHO.

 

I have seen quite a few installations where a cable checks out as far as the wiremap is concerned but doesn't pass other performance tests. This can be particularly annoying because it can lead to situations where it's very hard to find out why a particular computer seems to be having network issues. Without knowing the cabling is up to snuff, the possible sources of the problem(s) multiply quickly.

 

One of the most annoying symptoms of questionable cabling is erratic performance. It might be gigabit cabling but only work at 10 or 100 megabit speeds. Or, you might get good performance in one direction but crappy in the other.

 

Unfortunately, good cable testers aren't cheap. the lowest priced one I know of that works well is the Real World Certifier from Byte Brothers. But, your best bet is probably to see if you can rent a good tester for a day from a local LAN supply house.

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jmwills

Don't get stingy with the wire and don't get sloppy either. Give yourself enough slack in the runs to do the job and then a little extra at the ends.

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ikon

What jmwills said ^^. Leaving a coil of extra cable at one or both ends is commonly known in the industry as 'leaving a courtesy loop'.

 

There are a couple of other ideas I like to recommend:

  1. It's an excellent, and I do mean e-x-c-e-l-l-e-n-t. idea to leave a nylon/polyester 'pull string' for each run of cable, to facilitate pulling new cable in the future.
  2. Always drill bigger holes in studs and joists than you think you need. I hever go below 3/4" and often use 1" or 1 1/4". As much as possible, drill the holes as centered in the stud or joist as you can, to reduce any effects on structural integrity. BTW, a 'spade' bit works fine for drilling holes, but actual hole saws do a cleaner, neater job.

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pcdoc

If you can, run a cable to each flat wall, that way if you move things around you are covered. Accept for high traffic areas such as you main PC or server, you can use a switch for multiple devices but try to use a home run for each wall/room back to hour main switch/router. Running a TV, HTPC, and BD player off a switch is easy but avoid daisy chaining rooms, or room drops.

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Guest no-control

I realize im a bit late to the party but let me just say cable is cheaper than switches. Figure out what seems reasonable then dbl it.

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ikon

I realize im a bit late to the party but let me just say cable is cheaper than switches. Figure out what seems reasonable then dbl it.

 

True, a lot cheaper, so much so that I would go as far as to say triple or quadruple it. And, cable lasts longer too.

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jmwills

Yes, and very few firmware upgrades for cable. :D

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foy1der

Which is why I chose CAT 6!

 

Sent from my SCH-I535 using Tapatalk 2

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ikon

So, in summary:

  1. runs lots of extra cable, for future use;
  2. be sure any holes you drill to run cable have plenty of room to easily run more cable in the future;
  3. be sure to include a 'pull string' in each pathway, to facilitate more cable pulls in future;
  4. leave a 'courtesy loop' at both ends of each cable, to avoid having a cable wind up too short.

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