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Can't get rid of "free space low on hard drive" alert


eagle63
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Hey guys, I have an HTPC running win7 that is my media center box. It backs up nightly to my WHS2011 machine. My HTPC has 2 hard drives: a "c" drive which is for the OS and applications, and a "d" drive which is purely for recorded TV. The trouble is, WHS keeps alerting me that the D drive is low on free space. (less than 10% free seems to be the threshold at which it complains) I've clicked the "ignore this alert" many times, but eventually it always comes back. I think this is because as the free space on the drive fluctuates due to new recordings getting added and old recordings getting purged, it frequently hits that 10% threshold again and WHS re-alerts me that it's low.

 

This is not a huge deal certainly, but it's annoying because I hate seeing the yellow warning in my alerts unless it's something legit. Is there any way to permanently make WHS stop complaining about that specific drive?

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OK, somebody has to say it (ROTFLMAO) :D...... wait for it...... install a bigger drive!!! TaDa!!!

 

You sir are the winner!! Ah if only it were that easy. ;)

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Thank you, thank you. I am #1, I am #1... oh wait, ahem..... excuse me.... embarrassing :wacko:

 

Just curious, why wouldn't it be that easy? You could replace your D: drive with a bigger one or, assuming you have room, you could add a 3rd drive and stripe it with the exising 2nd drive.

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The reason it's not that easy is because it's a DVR. Again, the D drive on my HTPC is for recorded tv - and DVR's by definition should have a full hard drive. So even if I throw a 2TB hard drive in there, it's still going to fill up - it will just take a little longer.

 

I'm fine with WHS monitoring the C drive on my HTPC because that drive shouldn't fill up (and it it does I want to know about it), but the recordings drive really shouldn't even be monitored ideally.

Edited by eagle63
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I'm a little puzzled by the "DVR's by definition should have a full hard drive" statement. Why? We have a PVR from our cable company. It only has a 360GB drive. It never gets full because we erase shows after we've watched them. Are you perhaps using the "keep until space is needed" option for recorded shows?

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Are you perhaps using the "keep until space is needed" option for recorded shows?

 

Why in the world would you delete things manually?? That's the whole beauty of a DVR! :) But yes, that's exactly what I do. I've had this argument before... My brother (who is also quite technical) has a Tivo and I've seen him manually delete shows many times when I've been over at his house. I always ask him why he deletes recordings, and his answer is because it goes against his IT "instinct" to let a drive fill up. I totally get that feeling, but at some point you have to let go and trust the DVR. :)

 

 

All kidding aside, I'm guessing there probably isn't a way to completely surpress this warning. But I did just think of an idea... I believe windows media center will let you set a limit on how much of the drive it can consume with recordings. At the downside of losing perfectly usable drive space, I could adjust that slider so that it will always stay just under 90% full... Hmm, probably a silly solution but I do like seeing the green "everything's ok" health button on my WHS dashboard.

Edited by eagle63
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on my SBS2011E box, I'm using Stablebit drivepool $20 or so ( will also work on WHS2011). I don't use it for duplication but rather for having 1 large drive pool.

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