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nlitend1

Looking for a Mediasmart Server Power Supply

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nlitend1

My ex470 with upgraded cpu and ram seems somewhat unstable these days. im thinking it woud be a good idea to replace the power suppy because sometimes it completely shuts off even though all temps seem to be well within average ranges.

 

does anyone have a psu that they are looking to get rid of/sell?

if not, do u know of a place to get a reliable power supply for a good price?

 

thanks!

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Joe_Miner

My ex470 with upgraded cpu and ram seems somewhat unstable these days. im thinking it woud be a good idea to replace the power suppy because sometimes it completely shuts off even though all temps seem to be well within average ranges.

 

does anyone have a psu that they are looking to get rid of/sell?

if not, do u know of a place to get a reliable power supply for a good price?

 

thanks!

 

When mine failed I ended up going with an Athena AP-MFATX30 300W PSU -- But I did have to rewire it.

 

A description of what I did and my reference resources can be found at Power Supply Failure

 

A list of compatible power supplies and directions on how to modify them for the MSS can be found beginning at the Wiki entry Replacing the Power Supply

 

Part of the details I listed on the other post that are useful repeating here....................

 

The link: http://www.mediasmar...he_Power_Supply

Was very good and informative.

I also found useful the discussions at MediaSmartNet such as the one http://www.mediasmar...y/#comment-8972

After reading many links and posts I decided to try the “Athena Power AP-MFATX30 300W Mini ITX / Micro FLEX ATX / ATX12V 80 PLUS BRONZE Certified Active PFC Power Supply for 1U Mini-ITX chassis” which I found at NEW EGG! $50 at the time with free shipping! (Note: this PSU is referenced in the above two links too!) http://www.newegg.co...8-042-_-Product

There are several places you can go to find out how to take apart an EX487 but one of the most useful references I found was a 4-part video series and a 2-part video series:

 

Four Part Series:

,
,
,

 

Two Part Series:

,

 

Being the first time I had really ever opened up my EX487 and taken it apart this was a new, yet fun (in hindsight), experience for me.

In addition to a normal assortment of “tools” for digging around PC’s I would recommend to be sure to have the following as essential:

  • #00 Philips head screwdriver
  • Torx T15 screwdriver
  • Molex Extractor ATX tool that you will find as part of a PSU Modding Tool Kit such as this one http://www.newegg.co...odding tool kit – if I had known what I needed I could have ordered it from New Egg when I ordered the Athena – instead I ended up getting it at a local Computer store – it was their kit of this type on the shelf and very dusty – I lucked out big time – I don’t think I would have found it at our local Radio Shack.
  • A Basic multimeter (for testing the Old and New Power Supply pin outputs – My digital multimeter had recently bitten the dust but I used an old el-cheepo analog multimeter very successfully)
  • A hard copy of the Wiki – useful for checking the pin out voltages and making sure the 20 pin connector is wired correctly

Things I would strongly recommend but some may not feel is essential:

  • A ground strap – I always wear one when opening up electronics – why take a chance
  • An anti-static or grounding pad – very nice to set your electronics on when taking something apart – again why take a chance
  • An ample work space with room to take things apart as well as have a computer nearby – in taking apart the EX487 I would play a “step” in the process in one of the video links (see above) and then pause the video and do the same action on my EX487 – nice!
  • Take your time – don’t try to force things.
  • With the Molex Extractor ATX tool you can rewire the 20-pin in 20-30 minutes if you know what you’re doing – it took me about 3 hours to get to the point that I knew what I was doing – take your time – there are actual videos you can find on the internet that will show you how to use the Molex Extractor ATX tool – it’s a pain in the ass but once you figure out the proper technique it goes pretty smoothly. At my age I found it useful to take off my glasses and get up close o the connector and holding the target wire and pushing up from the back of the connector while inserting the Molex Extractor ATX tool so that the two “prongs” wiggled in between the inside walls of the terminal and the metal pin sides – smooth sailing once I learned how to do that! With the Athena PSU I had some extra connectors that I could practice on – and I’m glad I did. Even then I hit a glitch on the 20-pin connector when a wire disconnected from the pin leaving the pin still inside the connector – that took a while to get out but I kept working on it and was ultimately successful. Some people actually remove the pin’s without the Molex Extractor ATX tool and just using straight pin’s, as mentioned in the Wiki, I tried that at first and I’d suggest getting the Molex Extractor ATX tool – it makes life so much better.
  • When you get the 20-pin connector wired up – power up the PSU and test each pin’s voltage! I used my hardcopy printout of the Wiki and created an audit trail as I checked each pin. The Wiki tells you how to test -- starting by shorting terminals 1 & 2 with a paperclip (shorting terminals 1&2 is the PSU on-switch). You can also use that technique to test the old PSU to see if it’s really dead – my old PSU really was dead L.
  • With the Athena you’ll find that out of the box terminal 11 has two wires – an orange wire (3.3VDC) and a brown wire – the brown wire is a voltage sensor wire – as the Wiki suggests just move that double wire pin to terminal 20 – it works for me!
  • After testing each pin on my 20-pin connector and confirming everything I cut the other wires coming out of the power supply, sorted them by color and wrapped electrical tape and put shrink-tube on them.
  • Even though the Athena PSU is 300W it is smaller than the 200W HP PSU I was replacing – that was a good thing because it gave me more space to place my extra wire length – (If doing it over again it might of made more sense to cut 4-6” off of the wire and crimped on new pins for the 20-pin connector. It would have made things less cramped) All in all it’s possible to get the extra wire in the extra space and in the EX487 – but it’s a tight fit.
  • The clasp on my Athena 20-pin Connector stuck out too far for me to easily slide the MB & PSU into the case so I clipped it off – that 20-pin connector isn’t going anywhere anyway. (When you see how tight it is between the MB and the floor of the drive cage above you’ll know what I mean.)

I put my Server back together per the instructions in the Video (see above – those guys are the greatest) – plugged it into my network – plugged my power cable in to my UPS – turned it on – and it worked (complete with warnings that I hadn’t backed up any of my PC’s over the last 7 days J )

Edited by Joe_Miner
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Joe_Miner

The original links I had to the Video's that I referenced while tearing apart the Media Smart Server EX-487 had gone bad over the months since I last used them but I recently found them and updated the above post also.

 

Four Part Series:

,
,
,

 

Two Part Series:

,

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nlitend1

The original links I had to the Video's that I referenced while tearing apart the Media Smart Server EX-487 had gone bad over the months since I last used them but I recently found them and updated the above post also.

 

Four Part Series:

,
,
,

 

Two Part Series:

,

 

Thanks for both replies Joe Miner! I've purchased a FSP FSP220-60LE Micro ATX 220W PSU and will be modifying the molex connector when it's delivered next week.

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Joe_Miner

Good luck. Let us know how it goes and any pointers you pick up along the way.

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nlitend1

 

 

Thanks for both replies Joe Miner! I've purchased a FSP FSP220-60LE Micro ATX 220W PSU and will be modifying the molex connector when it's delivered next week.

 

So I got the PSU. Unfortunately its from a lacie NAS which does not have the standard 4pin atx connector u can pull from (it has a 4pin but its more like a fan connector on the end than the Molex atx connectors). I bought some female connectors I can solder on to replace the ends.

 

My question involves if there is a "best" 12 volt rail to pull from. I know single rail PSUs are best, but this PSU has 2 12v rails. The yellow wire (which is present in the current 20 pin connector and the connectors deacibed above has a max of 10amps. The other (yellow/black wire) is present in all of the sata connectors is rated at 16amp max.

 

What would be the best wires to splice to to get the last two yellow wires that are needed for the MSS 20 pin connector.

 

I'm thinking I should use the yellow/black wire rail for the higher max amperage. Is there any danger/drawback of using two different 12v tails in the 20 pin connector? Does and one know which yellow wires in the MSS 20 pin connector serve the hard drives and which go to the motherboard/CPU?

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Joe_Miner

I'm not much help here I think -- I looked up my Athena and my 12+V is on 2 rails 16A each. For the 2 extra Yellow's I just picked 2 Yellows that looked about the same wire gage as on the 20 pin connector.

 

On steady state the EX-487 is drawing less than 60W and I doubt if the Start-up is that much higher so you would probably be good either way you went.

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ikon

I think Joe_Miner is right; you may be overthinking this. It sounds like either rail would be more than enough to handle the load. If I had to choose, I would use the 16A rail for the HDDs. My reason? HDDs have motors, and motors all a spike when they start, in order to overcome inertia. Still, I don't think it matters all that much in your case.

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nlitend1

Thanks for the replies guys! Wasn't sure if anyone saw the post burried in this thread. :) Yeah, i might be overthinking it, but since i was dealing with a PSU and mixing output from two 12v rails, i wanted to make sure i wasn't crazy for thinking it was ok to do so.

 

I found an interesting post/article on this topic as well. I haven't had a chance to splice the wires, but i think i'll just leave the current yellow wire (10amp max rail) in the 20pin connector and then splice into the two yellow/black wires (16amp max rail) to get the other two yellow wires into the 20pin MSS connector. When you look at the pinout on the MSS, the there are two yellow wires next to each other and i'm thinking those are probably for the hard drives. So i think putting the two spliced (16amp) wires there would be the best bet for stability.

 

http://www.jonnyguru.com/forums/showthread.php?t=3990/

Edited by nlitend1

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ikon

yeah. johnnyGURU is a great site for PSU info.

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