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Guest no-control

Overheating GPUS dilemma solved

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Guest no-control

If you been listening to the podcast then you know how happy I was with the Corsair 550D case. Until I turned it on and tried to game with it. GPUs would over heat. I found a few issues in my system that may have resolved the overheating.

First is just a total derp on my part. Somehow when I did my initial RTFM of the case I missed the part where I could pull the fan cover off the front. This would have allow more air into the case. I don't think this alone would have solved the issue though. As one card ran really hot just over 90*c+ the other was spiking to over 100*c causing either system lock or shutdown.

When I moved all the equipment into a new case (Fractal Design Arc Midi read about it here) The temps dropped considerably. But I still had a 10*c discrepancy between the 2 cards. Something I had noticed when I originally upgraded to crossfire GPUs but just assumed was due to a lack of space sufficient cooling. Now with the side panel off and a fan blowing directly on them I still saw this. At this point it was obvious something wasn't right with the card. It was like the cooler just wasn't working right. Since my first card I bought new from the factory I knew it was within spec. But I had bought this one second hand. I had a feeling the previous owner tried to modify it.

I yanked the card and took the cooler off and confirmed that I was indeed correct. the previous owner had put a tom of Thermal Interface Material (TIM) on the GPU chip. I cleaned off the old, put down a clean thin layer, reassemble and reinstalled the card. Viola! Both cards run almost lockstep temps. only 3*c-4*c difference between them under load. One just at 80 the other just under 85 well within spec.

I detailed the process here if you are interested.

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Joe_Miner

Nice bit of investigative work.

 

I never would have thought to look at the TIM on the GPU.

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pcdoc

If you been listening to the podcast then you know how happy I was with the Corsair 550D case. Until I turned it on and tried to game with it. GPUs would over heat. I found a few issues in my system that may have resolved the overheating.

First is just a total derp on my part. Somehow when I did my initial RTFM of the case I missed the part where I could pull the fan cover off the front. This would have allow more air into the case. I don't think this alone would have solved the issue though. As one card ran really hot just over 90*c+ the other was spiking to over 100*c causing either system lock or shutdown.

When I moved all the equipment into a new case (Fractal Design Arc Midi read about it here) The temps dropped considerably. But I still had a 10*c discrepancy between the 2 cards. Something I had noticed when I originally upgraded to crossfire GPUs but just assumed was due to a lack of space sufficient cooling. Now with the side panel off and a fan blowing directly on them I still saw this. At this point it was obvious something wasn't right with the card. It was like the cooler just wasn't working right. Since my first card I bought new from the factory I knew it was within spec. But I had bought this one second hand. I had a feeling the previous owner tried to modify it.

I yanked the card and took the cooler off and confirmed that I was indeed correct. the previous owner had put a tom of Thermal Interface Material (TIM) on the GPU chip. I cleaned off the old, put down a clean thin layer, reassemble and reinstalled the card. Viola! Both cards run almost lockstep temps. only 3*c-4*c difference between them under load. One just at 80 the other just under 85 well within spec.

I detailed the process here if you are interested.

 

Nice, you should considering joining BYOB... :D

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ikon

Nice, you should considering joining BYOB... :D

 

Indeed. One would almost think he knows something about hardware.... go figure :D

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timekills

GPU TIM replacement - a job that has varied for me from simple to WTF - PITA depending on hard it is to remove the GPU's cover. I usually only go through it when I'm water cooling a GPU since I don't keep GPUs long enough to worry about the original TIM going dry.

 

I had a similar incident but with somewhat reverse initial cause. I got a GPU very cheaply because it was constantly overheating for a co-worker and he didn't want to deal with warranty (or it was out of warranty, don't recall which but it was a 470 that was only a year old.) It turned out to be encased in muck (dust/hair/etc) when I pulled the cover off to clean the fans. Didn't even have to mess with replacing TIM, just pulled the card apart, cleaned, replaced, et voila $300 card for $50.

 

Still was a damn hot and loud card though.

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ikon

Still was a damn hot and loud card though.

Well, it's an nVidia; heat kinda goes with the territory.

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Guest no-control

 

Well, it's an nVidia; heat kinda goes with the territory.

 

Not with the last generation they run cooler than AMD

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timekills

 

Well, it's an nVidia; heat kinda goes with the territory.

Not with the last generation they run cooler than AMD

 

Agreed with both; the 470/480 card were power-sucking, heat producing beasts (although the 460 I put into a co-worker's system rand fairly cool and quiet.)

 

For comparison The 460 was around 160 watts at idle and 280 under load, the 480 around 190 and 420 (!) and the 580 back down to about 170/390. Biggest difference was the temps though; the 480 idled at 51 C with 90+ under load normal, while the 580 went high 30's to high 70's at idle and load respectively. Big difference there already. The 680 is down to about 360 watts at load, and is about 10% cooler under load than the 580 was. It's on the low end of the last couple AMD generations relative to noise and temps. I could also bring up the driver issues that AMD always seems to have but that gets into the AMD vs nVIdia fanboy areas a bit,

 

Bottom line to me is the both company's current gen of GPUs have done a great job of reversing the heat/power trend. The 670 in my laptop (although still a final iteration of the Fermi core) runs remarkably well in a single fan 15" laptop.

 

Going back to the no-control's original post, I can say right now I have no desire to water cool a GPU since they all run quite well under air so I hope I won't have to mess with GPU TIM replacement anymore in the near future.

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Guest no-control

With the regular rotation of GPUS in my rig watercooling is just too expensive. Even when I had the quick disconnects. Hopefully in the near future I can get down to a single card for my resolution, but I doesn't appear that way especially with 4k rez looming.

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ikon

Agree about GPU water blocks; Having to buy an new one every couple of years gets a tad expensive.

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