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HP LX195 running too hot, help with case fan replacement


jeffla
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So my parents HP LX195 recently set off a Home Server Smart warning indicating the internal WD 640gb drive was too hot. Sure enought it was at 60c. For as long as they have owned the lx195 (2 years) it has always ran hot, guess I didn't know it was a bad thing. This was the 1st time it set off a warning about being too hot. I attempted to use SpeedFan to increase the 1 and only internal fan speed but it just won't budge from 900-1100 rpm. Max for that fan is around 3300rpm I've read. The lx195 uses 1 70mm 4 wire CPU fan as its case fan. I read a Newegg review of the lx195 where the reviewer suggest we cut the blue fan wire to force it to 3300rpm. That worked, but the server would not boot with the wire cut. So we spliced it back together. I talked with HP today and they suggested we replace the case fan and also to turn it around to change the flow direction. So finally to my question.

 

What do I replace the fan with? I can find plenty of other 70mm 4 wire fans, but without knowing the flow rate of the old one (hp doesn't know) I'm not sure how to go about buying one that moves more air.

 

why did cutting the blue wire prevent the server from booting up? (it sat with a blinking red health light, never booted fully)

 

Any suggestions are appreciated. At the moment we have the side of the case off. This has cooled the drive a little but it is creaping back up towards 50c again. There are two drives, hd0 is the WD 640gb internal and hd1 is a 160gb external drive used to backup my mom's books.

 

 

 

 

This is a copy of the newegg post that lead to cutting the blue wire.

 

Arghhh 12/5/2009

"none.gifGreat little box if you do some minor tweaks

 

Other Thoughts: The temps do run about 50 - 60 degrees C. The fan speed is usually around 800 RPM and is a 4 wire PWM fan.

 

If you don't mind a little noise you can open the case up and remove the blue wire from the plug and put some electrical tape around it. This will cause the fan to run at full speed, around 3300 RPM. I don't see temps above 35 Degrees C now. I keep the server in the basement so the noise isn't really an issue."

lx195.PNG

Edited by jeffla
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I am partial to Arctic Cooling fans, as seen in the photos in this thread. That CPU fan is virtually silent, even with your ear right up to it. I would also seriously look at adding 1 or more extra fans to the system, out the back and/or in the removable side cover. Arctic Cooling makes some really nice double-suspension case fans.

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Wow, that is amazing. I would have never thought cutting a wire on the fan would do that. I always figured that was just providing power and reading rpm but would have never thought it would interface with startup checks.

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Yeah, I could see it defeating the system's ability to regulate the fan speed, but I would not have thought it would interfere with booting up either.

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Given the Lx195 doesn't have a video out, we realy have no idea why it was not booting up after cutting the blue wire. Also, I'm a 3 hour drive from my parents so my dad and I were doing the repair via FaceTime which complicates things a little. With a desk fan now blowing on the open case across the internal hard drive, the temperature has dropped to 45c which still seems hot. The external has dropped to 33c. I plan on going down to my parents in the next month with a new case fan. I'll look into the Artic brand fans.

 

Jeff

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On Monday we'll be install the new case fan which by default has a double base rpm rate. We also will be moving the server from the second story of their home into the basement. I finally talked then into an APC battery backup. It helped that lightening hit the house next to ours Wednesday and fried our receiver, desktop computer speakers, all outside light and knocked out the power for a while. Everything was on a surge protector. My neightbors lost just about every electronic device they own. They had (dead now) a whole house surge protector. We both learned a valuable lesson, surge protectors can not protect direct lightening strikes. But 3 other neightbors their APC devices plus ours protected our stuff. Maybe we were just lucky.

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On Monday we'll be install the new case fan which by default has a double base rpm rate. We also will be moving the server from the second story of their home into the basement. I finally talked then into an APC battery backup. It helped that lightening hit the house next to ours Wednesday and fried our receiver, desktop computer speakers, all outside light and knocked out the power for a while. Everything was on a surge protector. My neightbors lost just about every electronic device they own. They had (dead now) a whole house surge protector. We both learned a valuable lesson, surge protectors can not protect direct lightening strikes. But 3 other neightbors their APC devices plus ours protected our stuff. Maybe we were just lucky.

 

Wow, great info! Thanks for sharing. I think it's a great move to move it to the basement as well. Keep us updated on your results :)

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Actually, most of the time, even UPS' (of whatever make) cannot protect from a direct lightning strike. I'd say you were somewhat lucky. What usually happens though is that the lightning strike isn't actually a real direct hit - it's usually a ground strike very near by, or it hits a tree or pole near by and travels through the ground. In those cases a UPS can often help.

 

If you think about it, it makes perfect sense. How could lightning travel miles through open air, infiltrate your power lines, then be stopped by a shorted-out gap of less than 1" in a UPS? It's absurd. Fortunately, most of the time, they're not direct strikes and the energy gets dissipated enough by the time it hits your UPS.

 

The real danger, most of the time, is from hits to power poles, which can often be direct hits. In those cases, the electricity travels down to your house wiring with almost full force. Nothing can protect your equipment from that. In fact, I've seen cases where people turned off breakers in their electrical box to protect their appliances and their fridge/freezer/stove/TV/etc got fried anyway cause the electricity actually leaped across the breaker points. That's why I actually unplug my appliances during storms.

 

BTW, I would no longer trust those UPS'. They did their job; time to replace them.

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You're right. When I think about it how could it possibly stop the lightning with a fuse. I'll replace my APC this week. The neightbors roof was hit and fortunetly didn't start on fire. Onkyo, even after telling them lightening killed the receiver said they'd fix it under warranty. I'm grateful to onkyo as I don't have to pay out of pocket to fix it. I'm also grateful to APC for protecting our home server. I'm going to implement some sort of offsite backup strategy now. Seeing my neightbor lose everything, well their microwave still works scared me straight. I naively believed a surge protector was all I needed.

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IMHO, if you have any data you value, you HAVE to have an offsite strategy. Don't forget, robbery is always a threat too. There are just too many things that can wipe out your data to not have offsite backup.

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