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vinylfreak

Tips for running and terminating Cat 6 cables.

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ImTheTypeOfGuy

You don't need a tester. Just plug it into a computer and see if it connects at gigabit speed. If not, you know you did something wrong. If it does, then do speed tests. If those are fine then you know it is connected fine.

 

Also, don't forget to check your local home depot. I don't remember what I paid for it but I bought a terminator and 500' about three years ago at home depot for much cheaper than I could at monoprice or ebay.

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Dave

I don't think a home user needs to test cables beyond connection and speed testing. I could never justify that cost. Years ago there was not a monoprice and it was always cheaper to buy it in 1000 foot spools. I used to keep a spool of several different cables and colors. Coax, 5E, Cat3, etc.

 

I make my own all the time and have been for two decades(coax back in the day!) Although I don't recall the spec but it's near impossible to crimp CAT6 to spec. I was thinking of doing a youtube or a live broadcast while making a patch cable. I'm sure there are hundreds out there on YT though.

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ImTheTypeOfGuy

I don't think a home user needs to test cables beyond connection and speed testing. I could never justify that cost. Years ago there was not a monoprice and it was always cheaper to buy it in 1000 foot spools. I used to keep a spool of several different cables and colors. Coax, 5E, Cat3, etc.

 

I make my own all the time and have been for two decades(coax back in the day!) Although I don't recall the spec but it's near impossible to crimp CAT6 to spec. I was thinking of doing a youtube or a live broadcast while making a patch cable. I'm sure there are hundreds out there on YT though.

 

True, but it is easy to get a gigabit connection.

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ikon

We'll just have to agree to disagree about the tester. The tests you describe are not adequate IMHO. The way computers determine performance in order to tell you if you've connected at gigabit or not is minimal at best. Basically, one simple negotiation sequence and it's done. A good tester goes way beyond that.

 

Even running speed tests by copying files doesn't really tell you if everything is as it should be. It could be fine one time and not another, all because of a connection that's slightly 'iffy'. A good tester will find that weakness. The advantage of using the premade cables and double-sided wall plates is that the brand name ones have been tested at the factory.

 

It used to be easier. The requirements for cables was lower: CAT5 is more lenient than CAT5e, and both are more lenient than CAT6. 10Mb is more lenient than 100Mb and they're both more lenient than gigabit: many connections that won't work at gigabit do work fine at 100Mb. Even pretty lousy connections will work at 10Mb.

 

I do understand that many people, including me, have for years made cables without testing them. All I'm saying is that I feel those days are over. The requirements of the faster standards are just too stringent, and that is only going to get worse as speeds go ever higher.

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ImTheTypeOfGuy

I would be surprised if all brand name cables are tested. I am sure they only test a few samples from the beginning, middle, and end of each batch they make. it would be very expensive and insufficient to test every cable.

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ikon

A properly implemented testing regime will give a yield rate over 99%. I don't know anyone who can crimp 99 out of 100 CAT5e cables perfectly. Obviously the situation is much worse with CAT6.

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vinylfreak

Wow! Thanks for all the Great! Advice and Tips Guys!

I definitely will be getting the pre-configured Cat 6 cables from Monoprice along with the Keystone Plates and appropriate jacks.

As soon as I can get a chance I need to get into my crawl space under the house to try to determine points to drill to come up into a wall , and feed cables into conventional outlet boxes.

I really like the idea of using the wall plates , rather than just coming up through the floor with cabling .

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ImTheTypeOfGuy

Wall plates not only make it easier for you in the long run but it looks so much nicer. I have two 6 connection wall plates in my office as I have 9 items in my office connected.

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Joe_Miner

Wow! Thanks for all the Great! Advice and Tips Guys!

I definitely will be getting the pre-configured Cat 6 cables from Monoprice along with the Keystone Plates and appropriate jacks.

As soon as I can get a chance I need to get into my crawl space under the house to try to determine points to drill to come up into a wall , and feed cables into conventional outlet boxes.

I really like the idea of using the wall plates , rather than just coming up through the floor with cabling .

 

I used all CAT6 cable and hardware. You can get a CAT6 plug to go into the wall plate that allows you to plug into the front and back so basically you can just snap it into the plate so there's no wiring. I left a pull line in each hole so I could pull additional cables thru in the future. Did three rooms this way. The following are pictures from my installation for the Family Room but all were essentially the same:

 

DSC03792.jpg

 

DSC03793.jpg

 

DSC03794.jpg

 

DSC03795.jpg

 

DSC03797.jpg

 

Below is what it looks like from the basement -- note my outlines of where I estimated the wall to be --

 

DSC03796.jpg

 

I sealed the hole with foil tape so it can be easiely opened up in the future. It was helpful getting the hardware at Fry's since I was able to visually piece it together.

 

Good luck!

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vinylfreak

I used all CAT6 cable and hardware. You can get a CAT6 plug to go into the wall plate that allows you to plug into the front and back so basically you can just snap it into the plate so there's no wiring. I left a pull line in each hole so I could pull additional cables thru in the future. Did three rooms this way. The following are pictures from my installation for the Family Room but all were essentially the same:

 

DSC03792.jpg

 

DSC03793.jpg

 

DSC03794.jpg

 

DSC03795.jpg

 

DSC03797.jpg

 

Below is what it looks like from the basement -- note my outlines of where I estimated the wall to be --

 

DSC03796.jpg

 

I sealed the hole with foil tape so it can be easiely opened up in the future. It was helpful getting the hardware at Fry's since I was able to visually piece it together.

 

Good luck!

 

Thanks for all the detail and the Pics John! Great Job!

I think my most difficult part will be trying to come up from the crawlspace and hit the wall cavity in the right spot.

Its a little easier to do with a full basement.

I am up for the challenge though. ;-)

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